Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Atmospheric and Climate Science Master Information
Electives
The students are free to choose individually from the entire course offer of ETH Zürich and the universities of Zürich and Bern.
Atmospheric Composition and Cycles
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1244-00LAerosols II: Applications in Environment and TechnologyW4 credits2V + 1UJ. Slowik, U. Baltensperger, M. Gysel Beer
AbstractMajor topics: Important sources and sinks of atmospheric aerosols and their importance for men and environment. Particle emissions from combustion systems, means to reduce emissions like particle filters.
ObjectiveProfound knowledge about aerosols in the atmosphere and applications of aerosols in technology
ContentAtmospheric aerosols:
important sources and sinks, wet and dry deposition, chemical composition, importance for men and environment, interaction with the gas phase, influence on climate.
Technical aerosols:
combustion aerosols, techniques to reduce emissions, application of aerosols in technology
Lecture notesInformation is distributed during the lectures
Literature- Colbeck I. (ed.) Physical and Chemical Properties of Aerosols, Blackie Academic & Professional, London, 1998.
- Seinfeld, J.H., and S.N. Pandis, Atmospheric chemistry and physics, John Wiley, New York, (1998).
701-0234-00LAtmospheric Chemistry: Instruments and Measuring Techniques Information W1 credit1VU. Krieger
AbstractMeasuring Techniques: Environmental Monitoring, Trace Gas Detection, Remote Sensing, Aerosol Characterization, Techniques used in the laboratory.
ObjectiveFind out about the specific problems connected to composition measurements in the atmosphere. Working out criteria for selecting an optimal measuring strategy. Acquiring knowledge about different measuring methods their spectroscopic principles and of some specific instruments.
ContentEs werden Methoden und Geräte vorgestellt und theoretisch analysiert, die in atmosphärenchemischen Messungen Verwendung finden: Geräte zur Überwachung im Rahmen der Luftreinhalteverordnung, Spurengasanlysemethoden, "remote sensing", Aerosolmessgeräte, Messverfahren bei Labormessungen zu atmosphärischen Fragestellungen.
LiteratureB. J. Finnlayson-Pitts, J. N. Pitts, "Chemistry of the Upper and Lower Atmosphere", Academic Press, San Diego, 2000
Prerequisites / NoticeMethodenvorlesung zu den Praktika 701-0460-00 und 701-1230-00. Die Kontaktzeiten in diesen Praktika sind so abgestimmt, dass der (empfohlene) Besuch der Vorlesung möglich ist.

Voraussetzungen: Atmosphärenphysik I und II
651-4004-00LThe Global Carbon Cycle - ReducedW3 credits2GT. I. Eglinton, M. Lupker
AbstractThe carbon cycle connects different reservoirs of C, including life on Earth, atmospheric CO2, and economically important geological reserves of C. Much of this C is in reduced (organic) form, and is composed of complex chemical structures that reflect diverse biological activity, processes and transformations.
ObjectiveA wealth of information is held within the complex organic molecules, both in the context of the contemporary carbon cycle and its links to is other biogeochemical cycles, as well as in relation to Earth's history, the evolution of life and climate on this planet.

In this course we will learn about the role of reduced forms of carbon in the global cycle, how these forms of carbon are produced, move around the planet, and become sequestered in the geological record, and how they can be used to infer biological activity and conditions on this planet in the geologic past. The course encompasses a range of spatial and temporal scales, from molecular to global, and from the contemporary environment to earliest life.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course and the lecture course "651-4044-00L Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry" Link are good preparations for the combined Field-Lab Course ("651-4044-02 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Field Course" and "651-4044-01 P Geomicrobiology and Biogeochemistry Lab Practical"). Details under Link
701-1240-00LModelling Environmental PollutantsW3 credits2GM. Scheringer, C. Bogdal
AbstractModeling the emissions, transport, partitioning and transformation/degradation of chemical contaminants in air, water and soil.
ObjectiveThis course is intended for students who are interested in the environmental fate and transport of volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals and exposure to pollutants in environmental media including air, water, soil and biota. The course focuses on the theory and application of mass-balance models of environmental pollutants. These models are quantitative tools for describing, understanding, and predicting the way pollutants interact with the environment. Important topics include thermodynamic and kinetic descriptions of chemical behavior in environmental systems; mechanisms of chemical degradation in air and other media; novel approaches to modeling chemical fate in a variety of environments, including lakes and rivers, generic regions, and at the global scale, and application of mass balance modeling principles to describe bioaccumulation of pollutants by fish and mammals.
ContentApplication of mass balance principles to chemicals in a system of coupled environmental media. Measurement and estimation of physico-chemical properties that determine the environmental behavior of chemicals. Thermodynamic and kinetic controls on the behavior of pollutants. Modeling environmental persistence, bioaccumulation and long-range transport potential of chemicals, including a review of available empirical data on various degradation processes. Current issues in multimedia contaminant fate modeling and a case study of the student's choice.
Lecture notesMaterial to support the lectures will be distributed during the course.
LiteratureThere is no required text. The following texts are useful for background reading and additional information.
D. Mackay. Multimedia Environmental Models: The Fugacity Approach, 2nd Ed. 2001. CRC Press.
R. P. Schwarzenbach, P. M. Gschwend, D. M. Imboden. Environmental Organic Chemistry. 2nd Ed. 2003, John Wiley & Sons.
M. Scheringer. Persistence and spatial range of environmental chemicals: New ethical and scientific concepts for risk assessment. 2002. Wiley-VCH.
701-1317-00LGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles and ClimateW3 credits3GN. Gruber, M. Vogt
AbstractThe human-induced emissions of carbon dioxide has led to atmospheric CO2 concentrations that Earth likely has no’t seen for the last 30 million years. This course aims to investigate and understand the impact of humans on Earth's biogeochemical cycles with a focus on the carbon cycle and its interaction with the physical climate system for the past, the present, and the future.
ObjectiveThis course aims to investigate the nature of the interaction between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean with climate and how this interaction has evolved over time and will change in the future. Students are expected to participate actively in the course, which includes the critical reading of the pertinent literature and class presentations.
ContentTopics discussed include: The anthropogenic perturbation of the global carbon cycle and climate. Response of land and oceanic ecosystems to past and future global changes; Interactions between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean; Biogeochemical processes controlling carbon dioxide and oxygen in the ocean and atmosphere on time-scales from a few years to a few hundred thousand years.
Lecture notesSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press. Additional handouts will be provided as needed. see website: Link
LiteratureSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press, 526pp.

MacKenzie, F. T. (1999), Global biogeochemical cycles and the physical climate system, Global Change Instruction Program, UCAR, Boulder, CO, 69pp.

W. H. Schlesinger (1997), Biogeochemistry: An Analysis of Global Change, Academic Press.

Original literature.
701-1280-00LSelf-learning Course on Advanced Topics in Atmospheric and Climate Science Restricted registration - show details
Please contact one of the professors listed under prerequisites/notice if you plan to take this course.

Students are allowed to enroll in both courses 701-1280-00L & 701-1281-00L Self-learning Course on Advanced Topics in Atmospheric and Climate Science but have to choose different supervisors.
W3 credits6ASupervisors
AbstractThis course offers an individual pathway to deepen knowledge and understanding of a specific advanced topic in atmospheric and climate science in one of these fields:
- atmospheric chemistry
- atmospheric circulation and predictability
- atmospheric dynamics
- atmospheric physics
- climate modeling
- climate physics
- land-climate dynamics
ObjectiveThe learning goals of this course are threefold: 1) obtain novel insight into an advanced scientific topic, 2) train the self-study competences in particular related to reading of advanced textbooks and writing a concise summary, and 3) gain experience in the scientific interaction with experts. The format of the course is complementary to other types of teaching (lectures and seminars) and addresses skills that are essential for a wide range of professional activities (including a PhD).
ContentThe course has the following elements:
Week 1: Selection of specific topic and decision about reading material (textbook chapters and maybe 1-2 review papers)
Week 2: General discussion about self-study skills (how to read scientific literature and write summaries; specifics of scientific writing; how to prepare efficient meetings). For the scientific writing, students are encouraged to participate in an online training course offered by Stanford University:
Link
Weeks 6 and 9: Meetings with supervisor to clarify scientific questions
Week 12: Hand-in of written summary (4 pages maximum)
Week 14: Supervisor provides written feedback to the summary document
Week 16: Oral exam about the scientific topic
LiteratureLiterature (including book chapters, scientific publications) will be provided by the responsible supervisor in coordination with the student.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites depend on the chosen field and include successful completion of the listed lecture courses:
• atmospheric dynamics: “Dynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow” (701-1221-00L)
• atmospheric chemistry: “Stratospheric Chemistry” (701-1233-00L) or “Tropospheric Chemistry” (701-1234-00L) or “Aerosols I” (402-0572-00L).
• atmospheric physics: “Atmospheric Physics” (701-0475-00L)
• climate physics: “Klimasysteme” (701-0412-00L) or equivalent
• land-climate dynamics: “Land-climate dynamics” (701-1251-00L)
• climate modeling: “Numerical modeling of weather and climate” (701-1216-00L) (parallel attendance possible)
• atmospheric circulation and predictability: “Dynamics of large-scale atmospheric flow” (701-1221-00L)

If you plan to take this course, please contact one of the professors according to your interest.
• atmospheric chemistry (Prof. T. Peter)
• atmospheric circulation and predictability (Prof. D. Domeisen)
• atmospheric dynamics (Prof. H. Wernli)
• atmospheric physics (Prof. U. Lohmann)
• climate modeling (Prof. C. Schär)
• climate physics (Prof. R. Knutti)
• land-climate dynamics (Prof. S. Seneviratne)
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