Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Atmospheric and Climate Science Master Information
Modules
Atmospheric Composition and Cycles
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1234-00LTropospheric ChemistryW3 credits2GD. W. Brunner, I. El Haddad
AbstractThe course gives an overview tropospheric chemistry, which is based on laboratory studies, measurements and numerical modelling. The topics include aerosol, photochemistry, emissions and depositions. The lecture covers urban-regional-to-global scale issues, as well as fundamentals of the atmospheric nitrogen, sulfur and CH4 cycles and their contributions to aerosol and oxidant formation.
ObjectiveBased on the presented material the students are expected to understand the most relevant processes responsible for the anthropogenic disturbances of tropospheric chemical composition. The competence of synthesis of knowledge will be improved by paper reading and student's presentations.
These presentations relate to a particular actual problem selected by the candidates.
ContentStarting from the knowledge acquired in lecture 701-0471, the course provides a more profound view on the the chemical and dynamical process governing the composition and impacts of air pollutants like aerosol and ozone, at the Earth's surface and the free troposphere.
Specific topics covered by the lecture are: laboratory and ambient measurements in polluted and pristine regions, the determination of emissions of a variety of components, numerical modelling across scales, regional air pollution - aerosol, and photooxidant in relation to precursor emissions,
impacts (health, vegetation, climate), the global cycles of tropospheric ozone, CH4, sulfur and nitrogen components.
Lecture notesLecture presentations are available for download.
LiteratureD. Jacob, Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry Link

Mark Z. Jacobson: Fundamentals of Atmospheric Modelling, Cambridge University Press

John Seinfeld and Spyros Pandis, Atmosperic Chemistry and Physics, from air pollution to Climate Change, Wiley, 2006.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe basics in physical chemsitry are required and an overview equivalent to the bachelor course in atmospheric chemsitry (lecture 701-0471-01) is expected.
701-1238-00LAdvanced Field and Lab Studies in Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.
W3 credits2PU. Krieger
AbstractIn the course 701-0460-00 P we offer the opportunity to carry out atmospheric physical and chemical experiments. The present course will be held in connection with this practical course. An individual assignment of a specific topic will be made for interested students who can acquire knowledge in experimental, instrumental, or numerical aspects of atmospheric chemistry.
ObjectiveIn the course 701-0460-00 P, Practical training in atmosphere and climate, we offer the opportunity to carry out atmospheric physical and chemical experiments. The present course will be held in connection with this practical course. An individual assignment of a specific topic will be made for interested students who can acquire knowledge in experimental, instrumental, numerical or theoretical aspects of atmospheric chemistry.

This course is addressed to students who have not attended the practical course 701-0460-00 P during their Bachelor studies, but want to gain knowledge in field work connected to atmospheric chemistry. The specific topic to work on may be chosen based on individual interests and resources available.
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is mandatory for interested students to contact the instructor before the term starts, so that individual assignments can be made/planned for.

The maximum number of participants for this course will be limited depending on resources available.
701-1317-00LGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles and ClimateW3 credits3GN. Gruber, M. Vogt
AbstractThe human-induced emissions of carbon dioxide has led to atmospheric CO2 concentrations that Earth likely has no’t seen for the last 30 million years. This course aims to investigate and understand the impact of humans on Earth's biogeochemical cycles with a focus on the carbon cycle and its interaction with the physical climate system for the past, the present, and the future.
ObjectiveThis course aims to investigate the nature of the interaction between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean with climate and how this interaction has evolved over time and will change in the future. Students are expected to participate actively in the course, which includes the critical reading of the pertinent literature and class presentations.
ContentTopics discussed include: The anthropogenic perturbation of the global carbon cycle and climate. Response of land and oceanic ecosystems to past and future global changes; Interactions between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean; Biogeochemical processes controlling carbon dioxide and oxygen in the ocean and atmosphere on time-scales from a few years to a few hundred thousand years.
Lecture notesSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press. Additional handouts will be provided as needed. see website: Link
LiteratureSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press, 526pp.

MacKenzie, F. T. (1999), Global biogeochemical cycles and the physical climate system, Global Change Instruction Program, UCAR, Boulder, CO, 69pp.

W. H. Schlesinger (1997), Biogeochemistry: An Analysis of Global Change, Academic Press.

Original literature.
  •  Page  1  of  1