Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Atmospheric and Climate Science Master Information
Modules
Weather Systems and Atmospheric Dynamics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1224-00LMesoscale Atmospheric Systems - Observation and ModellingW2 credits2VH. Wernli, U. Germann
AbstractMesoscale meteorology focusing on processes relevant for the evolution of precipitation systems. Discussion of empirical and mathematical-physical models for, e.g., fronts and convective storms. Consideration of oceanic evaporation, transport and the associated physics of stable water isotopes. Introduction to weather radar being the widespread instrument for observing mesoscale precipitation.
ObjectiveBasic concepts of observational and theoretical mesoscale meteorology, including precipitation measurements and radar. Knowledge about the interpretation of radar images. Understanding of processes leading to the formation of fronts and convective storms, and basic knowledge on ocean evaporation and the physics of stable water isotopes.
701-1216-00LNumerical Modelling of Weather and Climate Information W4 credits3GC. Schär, N. Ban
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to weather and climate models. It discusses how these models are built addressing both the dynamical core and the physical parameterizations, and it provides an overview of how these models are used in numerical weather prediction and climate research. As a tutorial, students conduct a term project and build a simple atmospheric model using the language PYTHON.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, students understand how weather and climate models are formulated from the governing physical principles, and how they are used for climate and weather prediction purposes.
ContentThe course provides an introduction into the following themes: numerical methods (finite differences and spectral methods); adiabatic formulation of atmospheric models (vertical coordinates, hydrostatic approximation); parameterization of physical processes (e.g. clouds, convection, boundary layer, radiation); atmospheric data assimilation and weather prediction; predictability (chaos-theory, ensemble methods); climate models (coupled atmospheric, oceanic and biogeochemical models); climate prediction. Hands-on experience with simple models will be acquired in the tutorials.
Lecture notesSlides and lecture notes will be made available at
Link
LiteratureList of literature will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: to follow this course, you need some basic background in atmospheric science, numerical methods (e.g., "Numerische Methoden in der Umweltphysik", 701-0461-00L) as well as experience in programming. Previous experience with PYTHON is useful but not required.
701-1226-00LInter-Annual Phenomena and Their Prediction Information W2 credits2GC. Appenzeller
AbstractThis course provides an overview of the current ability to understand and predict intra-seasonal and inter-annual climate variability in the tropical and extra-tropical region and provides insights on how operational weather and climate services are organized.
ObjectiveStudents will acquire an understanding of the key atmosphere and ocean processes involved, will gain experience in analyzing and predicting sub-seasonal to inter-annual variability and learn how operational weather and climate services are organised and how scientific developments can improve these services.
ContentThe course covers the following topics:

Part 1:
- Introduction, some basic concepts and examples of sub-seasonal and inter-annual variability
- Weather and climate data and the statistical concepts used for analysing inter-annual variability (e.g. correlation analysis, teleconnection maps, EOF analysis)

Part 2:
- Inter-annual variability in the tropical region (e.g. ENSO, MJO)
- Inter-annual variability in the extra-tropical region (e.g. Blocking, NAO, PNA, regimes)

Part 3:
- Prediction of inter-annual variability (statistical methods, ensemble prediction systems, monthly and seasonal forecasts, seamless forecasts)
- Verification and interpretation of probabilistic forecast systems
- Climate change and inter-annual variability

Part 4:
- Challenges for operational weather and climate services
- Role of weather and climate extremes
- Early warning systems
- A visit to the forecasting centre of MeteoSwiss
Lecture notesA pdf version of the slides will be available at
Link
LiteratureReferences are given during the lecture.
701-1228-00LCloud Dynamics: Hurricanes Information W4 credits3GU. Lohmann
AbstractHurricanes are among the most destructive elements in the atmosphere. This lecture will discuss the physical requirements for their formation, life cycle, damage potential and their relationship to global warming. It also distinguishes hurricanes from thunderstorms and tornadoes.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course students will be able to distinguish the formation and life cycle mechanisms of tropical cyclones from those of extratropical thunderstorms/cyclones, project how tropical cyclones change in a warmer climate based on their physics and evaluate different tropical cyclone modification ideas.
Lecture notesSlides will be made available
LiteratureA literature list can be found here: Link
Prerequisites / NoticeAt least one introductory lecture in Atmospheric Science or Instructor's consent.
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