Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Chemistry Master Information
Master Studies (Programme Regulations 2018)
Core Subjects
Inorganic Chemistry
Offered during spring semester
Organic Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0233-01LOrganic Synthesis: Methods and Strategies Information W+6 credits3GE. M. Carreira
AbstractThe complex relation between structural analysis, methods leading to desired transformations, and insight into reaction mechanisms is exemplified. Relations between retrosynthetic analysis of target structures, synthetic methods and their combination in a synthetic strategy.
ObjectiveExtension and deepening of the knowledge in organic synthesis.
ContentConcepts of the planning of organic synthesis (strategy and tactics), retrosynthetic analysis. Structure-reactivity relation in the context of the synthesis of complex molecules.
LiteratureK. C. Nicolaou, E. J. Sorensen, Classics in Total Synthesis, Wiley-VCH 1996.
K. C. Nicolaou, S. A. Snyder, Classics in Total Synthesis II, Wiley-VCH 2003.
K. C. Nicolaou, J. Chen, Classics in Total Synthesis III, Wiley-VCH 2011.
Prerequisites / NoticeOC I-IV
529-0241-10LAdvanced Methods and Strategies in SynthesisW+6 credits3GJ. W. Bode
AbstractAdvanced Modern Methods and Strategies in Synthesis
ObjectiveKnowledge of modern methods in asymmetric stereocontrol, enantioselective catalysis, and organic reaction mechanisms.
ContentCurrent trends in methods for and approaches to synthesis of complex natural products, pharmaceuticals, and biological molecules; fragment coupling and protecting group strategies; chemical ligation and biomolecules synthesis; enantioselective catalysis including ligand design and optimization; cross coupling reactions from preactivated precursors; C-H activation and oxidation chemistry; building block synthesis with chiral auxiliaries and reagents; new concepts in asymmetric catalysis. Analysis of key primarily literature including identification of trends, key precendents, and emerging topics will be emphasized.
Lecture noteswill be provided in class and online
LiteratureSuggesting Textbooks
1. Walsh and Kozlowski, Fundamentals of Asymmetric Catalysis, 1st Ed., University Science Books, 2009.
2. Anslyn and Dougherty, Modern Physical Organic Chemistry, 1st Ed., University Science Books, 2006.
Physical Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0433-01LAdvanced Physical Chemistry: Statistical ThermodynamicsW+6 credits3GG. Jeschke, J. Richardson
AbstractIntroduction to statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Prediction of thermodynamic and kinetic properties from molecular data.
ObjectiveIntroduction to statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Prediction of thermodynamic and kinetic properties from molecular data.
ContentBasics of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of classical and quantum systems. Concept of ensembles, microcanonical and canonical ensembles, ergodic theorem. Molecular and canonical partition functions and their connection with classical thermodynamics. Quantum statistics. Translational, rotational, vibrational, electronic and nuclear spin partition functions of gases. Determination of the equilibrium constants of gas phase reactions. Description of ideal gases and ideal crystals. Lattice models, mixing entropy of polymers, and entropic elasticity.
Lecture notesSee homepage of the lecture.
LiteratureSee homepage of the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeChemical Thermodynamics, Reaction Kinetics, Molecular Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy; Mathematical Foundations (Analysis, Combinatorial Relations, Integral and Differential Calculus)
Research Projects
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0200-10LResearch Project I Information W13 credits16AProfessors
AbstractIn a research project students extend their knowledge in a particular field, get acquainted with the scientific way of working, and learn to work on an actual research topic. Research projects are carried out in a core or optional subject area as chosen by the student.
ObjectiveStudents are accustomed to scientific work and they get to know one specific research field.
529-0201-10LResearch Project II Information W13 credits16AProfessors
AbstractIn a research project students extend their knowledge in a particular field, get acquainted with the scientific way of working, and learn to work on an actual research topic. Research projects are carried out in a core or optional subject area as chosen by the student.
ObjectiveStudents are accustomed to scientific work and they get to know one specific research field.
Industry Internship or Laboratory Course
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0202-00LIndustry Internship Information
Nur für Chemie MSc, Studienreglement 2018.
W13 creditsSupervisors
AbstractInternship in industry with a minimum duration of 7 weeks
ObjectiveThe aim of the internship is to make students acquainted with industrial work environments. During this time, they will have the opportunity to get involved in current projects of the host institution.
529-0739-10LBiological Chemistry A: Technologies for Directed Evolution of Enzymes Restricted registration - show details
Advanced laboratory course or internship depending on lab course Biological Chemistry B

Candidates must inquire with P. Kast no later than September 1st whether course will take place (no self-enrollment)

Further information to registration and work hours: Link
W13 credits16PP. A. Kast, D. Hilvert
AbstractDuring this semester course, methodologies will be taught for biological-chemical enzyme evolution experiments using molecular genetic mutation technologies and in vivo selection in recombinant bacterial strains.
ObjectiveAll technologies used for the experiments will be explained to the students in practice with the goal that they will be able to independently apply them for the course project and in future research endeavors. After the course, an individual report about the results obtained has to be prepared.
ContentThis class conducts and supports experiments for a specifically designed genuine research project. We will carry out biological-chemical enzyme evolution experiments using molecular genetic mutation technologies and in vivo selection in recombinant bacterial strains. The relevant technologies will be taught to the students, such as the preparation of competent cells, production and isolation of DNA fragments, transformation of gene libraries, and DNA sequencing. The course participants will generate a variety of different variants of a chorismate mutase. Individual enzyme catalysts will be purified and subsequently characterized using several different spectroscopic methods. The detailed chemical-physical analyses include determination of the enzymes' kinetic parameters, their molecular mass, and the integrity of the protein structure. The students will present the results obtained from their individual evolution experiments at the end of the semester. We expect that during this lab course we will not only generate novel enzymes, but also gain new mechanistic insights into the investigated catalyst.
Lecture notesThe necessary documents and protocols will be distributed to the participants during the course.
LiteratureGeneral literature to "Directed Evolution" and chorismate mutases, e.g.:

– Taylor, S. V., P. Kast & D. Hilvert. 2001. Investigating and engineering enzymes by genetic selection. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 40: 3310-3335.

– Jäckel, C., P. Kast & D. Hilvert. 2008. Protein design by directed evolution. Annu. Rev. Biophys. 37: 153-173.

– Roderer, K. & P. Kast. 2009. Evolutionary cycles for pericyclic reactions – Or why we keep mutating mutases. Chimia 63: 313-317.

Further literature will be indicated in the distributed script.
Prerequisites / Notice- This laboratory course will involve experiments that require a tight schedule and (sometimes) long (!) working days.
- The projects of this course are tightly linked to the ones of the Biology BSc course "529-0739-01 Biological Chemistry B: New Enzymes from Directed Evolution Experiments", which takes place as a block course during the month of November. There will be joint lectures for the participants of both courses during that time. The teaching language is English.
- The number of participants for the laboratory class is limited. It is mandatory to sign up for the course directly with P. Kast no later than September 1, prior to the start of the fall semester. Until then it will be decided whether the course will take place.
- A valid registration is considered a commitment for attendance of the entire semester course, as involved material orders and experimental preparations are necessary and, once the class has started, the flow of the experiments must not be interrupted by individual absences. In case of an emergency, please immediately notify P. Kast.
- For more information, see also Link or contact P. Kast directly (HCI F 333, Tel. 044 632 29 08, Link).
Master's Thesis
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0500-10LMaster's Thesis Restricted registration - show details
Only for Chemistry MSc, Programme Regulations 2018.

Only students who fulfill the following criteria are allowed to begin with their Master's thesis:
a. successful completion of the Bachelor's programme;
b. fulfilling of any additional requirements necessary to gain admission to the Master's programme.

Duration of the Master's Thesis 20 weeks.
O25 credits54DProfessors
Abstract
Objective
Electives
Inorganic Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0143-01LInorganic and Organometallic PolymersW6 credits3GH. Grützmacher, J. Grützmacher
Abstract1. Introduction: What are Inorganic Polymers
1.1. Classification, 1.2. Nomenclature, 1.3. Synthetic Strategies, 1.4. Characterisation
2. Polyphosphazenes
3. Polysiloxanes
4. Organometallic Polymers
5. Dendritic Molecules
6. Introduction to Inorganic Materials
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the current literature in the field of inorganic polymers and materials.
Lecture notesA manuscript will be distributed to the participants of the course.
LiteratureScript and recent orginal literature indicated in the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasis for the understanding of this lecture are the courses Allgemeine Chemie 1&2, Anorganische Chemie 1: Übergangsmetallchemie (Dozent Mezzetti).
Organic Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0243-01LTransition Metal Catalysis: From Mechanisms to Applications Information W6 credits3GB. Morandi
AbstractDetailed discussion of selected modern transition metal catalyzed reactions from a synthetic and mechanistic viewpoint
ObjectiveUnderstanding and critical evaluation of current research in transition metal catalysis. Design of mechanistic experiments to elucidate reaction mechanisms. Synthetic relevance of transition metal catalysis. Students will also learn about writing an original research proposal during a workshop.
ContentDetailed discussion of selected modern transition metal catalyzed reactions from a synthetic and mechanistic viewpoint. Synthetic applications of these reactions. Introduction and application of tools for the elucidation of mechanisms. Selected examples of topics include: C-H activation, C-O activation, C-C activation, gold catalysis, redox active ligands, main group redox catalysis, frustrated Lewis pairs.
Lecture notesLecture slides will be provided online. A Handout summarizing important concepts in organometallic and physical organic chemistry will also be provided. Useful references and handouts will also be provided during the workshop.

Slides will be uploaded 1-2 days before each lecture on Link (password will be given during the first lecture or can be requested by email)
LiteraturePrimary literature and review articles will be cited during the course.

The following textbooks can provide useful support for the course:

- Anslyn and Dougherty, Modern Physical Organic Chemistry, 1st Ed., University Science Books.
- Crabtree R., The Organometallic Chemistry of the Transition Metals, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
- Hartwig J., Organotransition Metal Chemistry: From Bonding to Catalysis, University Science Books.
- J. P. Collman, L. S. Hegedus, J. R. Norton, R. G. Finke, Principles and Applications of Organotransition Metal Chemistry.
Prerequisites / NoticeRequired level: Courses in organic and physical chemistry of the first and second year as well as ACIII

Special requirement: each participant will have to come up with an independent research proposal to be presented orally at the end of the semester. A dedicated workshop will be organized in the middle of the semester to introduce the students to proposal writing and presentation.
529-0233-01LOrganic Synthesis: Methods and Strategies Information W6 credits3GE. M. Carreira
AbstractThe complex relation between structural analysis, methods leading to desired transformations, and insight into reaction mechanisms is exemplified. Relations between retrosynthetic analysis of target structures, synthetic methods and their combination in a synthetic strategy.
ObjectiveExtension and deepening of the knowledge in organic synthesis.
ContentConcepts of the planning of organic synthesis (strategy and tactics), retrosynthetic analysis. Structure-reactivity relation in the context of the synthesis of complex molecules.
LiteratureK. C. Nicolaou, E. J. Sorensen, Classics in Total Synthesis, Wiley-VCH 1996.
K. C. Nicolaou, S. A. Snyder, Classics in Total Synthesis II, Wiley-VCH 2003.
K. C. Nicolaou, J. Chen, Classics in Total Synthesis III, Wiley-VCH 2011.
Prerequisites / NoticeOC I-IV
529-0241-10LAdvanced Methods and Strategies in SynthesisW6 credits3GJ. W. Bode
AbstractAdvanced Modern Methods and Strategies in Synthesis
ObjectiveKnowledge of modern methods in asymmetric stereocontrol, enantioselective catalysis, and organic reaction mechanisms.
ContentCurrent trends in methods for and approaches to synthesis of complex natural products, pharmaceuticals, and biological molecules; fragment coupling and protecting group strategies; chemical ligation and biomolecules synthesis; enantioselective catalysis including ligand design and optimization; cross coupling reactions from preactivated precursors; C-H activation and oxidation chemistry; building block synthesis with chiral auxiliaries and reagents; new concepts in asymmetric catalysis. Analysis of key primarily literature including identification of trends, key precendents, and emerging topics will be emphasized.
Lecture noteswill be provided in class and online
LiteratureSuggesting Textbooks
1. Walsh and Kozlowski, Fundamentals of Asymmetric Catalysis, 1st Ed., University Science Books, 2009.
2. Anslyn and Dougherty, Modern Physical Organic Chemistry, 1st Ed., University Science Books, 2006.
Physical Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0433-01LAdvanced Physical Chemistry: Statistical ThermodynamicsW6 credits3GG. Jeschke, J. Richardson
AbstractIntroduction to statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Prediction of thermodynamic and kinetic properties from molecular data.
ObjectiveIntroduction to statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Prediction of thermodynamic and kinetic properties from molecular data.
ContentBasics of statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of classical and quantum systems. Concept of ensembles, microcanonical and canonical ensembles, ergodic theorem. Molecular and canonical partition functions and their connection with classical thermodynamics. Quantum statistics. Translational, rotational, vibrational, electronic and nuclear spin partition functions of gases. Determination of the equilibrium constants of gas phase reactions. Description of ideal gases and ideal crystals. Lattice models, mixing entropy of polymers, and entropic elasticity.
Lecture notesSee homepage of the lecture.
LiteratureSee homepage of the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeChemical Thermodynamics, Reaction Kinetics, Molecular Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy; Mathematical Foundations (Analysis, Combinatorial Relations, Integral and Differential Calculus)
529-0443-01LAdvanced Magnetic Resonance Information W6 credits3GB. H. Meier, M. Ernst, T. Wiegand
AbstractThe course is for advanced students and covers selected topics from magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This year, the lecture will introduce and discuss the theoretical foundation of high-resolution solid-state NMR under magic-angle spinning.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to familiarize the students with the basic concepts of modern high-resolution solid-state NMR. Starting from the mathematical description of spin dynamics, important building blocks for multi-dimensional experiments are discussed to allow students a better understanding of modern solid-state NMR experiments. Particular emphasis is given to achiving high spectral resolution.
ContentThe basic principles of NMR in solids will be introduced. After the discussion of basic tools to describe NMR experiments, basic methods and experiments will be discussed, e.g., magic-angle spinning, cross polarization, decoupling, and recoupling experiments. Such basic building blocks allow a tailoring of the effective Hamiltonian to the needs of the experiment. These basic building blocks can then be combined in different ways to obtain spectra that contain the desired information.
Lecture notesA script which covers the topics will be distributed in the lecture and will be accessible through the web page Link
529-0445-01LAdvanced Optics and SpectroscopyW6 credits3GR. Signorell, G. David
AbstractThis course provides an introduction to the interaction of light with nano- and microparticles followed by an overview of applications of current interest. Examples range from nanoparticles for medical applications and sensing to the role of the interaction of solar radiation with aerosol particles and cloud droplets for the climate.
ObjectiveThe students will be introduced to the basic concepts of the interaction of light with nano- and microparticles. The combination of basic concepts with different applications will enable students to apply their knowledge to new problems in various fields where nanoscale objects play a role.
ContentLight interacts surprisingly differently with small particles than with bulk or with gas phase materials. The first part of the course provides a basic but rigorous introduction into the interaction of light with nano- and microparticles. The emphasis is on the classical treatment of absorption and scattering of light by small particles. The strengths and limits of this conventional approach will be discussed. The second part of the course is devoted to a broad range of applications. Here topics include: Plasmon resonances in metallic systems, metallo-dielectric nanoparticles for medical applications, the use of lasers for optical trapping and characterization of single particles, vibrational excitons in dielectric nanoparticles, interaction of light with aerosol particles and cloud droplets for remote sensing applications and climate predictions, characterization of ultrafine aerosol particles by photoemission using velocity map imaging.
Lecture noteswill be distributed during the course
LiteratureBasics: Absorption and Scattering of Light by Small Particles, C. F. Bohren and D. R. Huffman, John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Applications: References will be provided during the course.
Analytical Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0043-01LAnalytical Strategy Information W6 credits3GR. Zenobi, M. Badertscher, G. Goubert, A. G. Graham, D. Günther
AbstractProblem-oriented development of analytical strategies and solutions.
ObjectiveAbility to create solutions for particular analytical problems.
ContentIndividual development of strategies for the optimal application of chemical, biochemical, and physico-chemical methods in analytical chemistry solving predefined problems. Experts from industry and administration present particular problems in their field of activity.
Principles of sampling.
Design and application of microanalytical systems.
Lecture notesCopies of problem sets and solutions will be distributed free fo charge
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
529-0051-00 "Analytical Chemistry I (3. Semester)"
529-0058-00 "Analytical Chemistry II (4. Semester)"
(or equivalent)
529-0049-00LAnalytical Methods for Characterization of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials
Does not take place this semester.
W2 credits2GC. Latkoczy
AbstractIntroduction to modern analytical methods used to fully characterize and identify nano-engineered materials and systems.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of analytical concepts used in nanotechnology, In-depth knowledge of most important methods used in industry and research, Introduction to selected industrial applications, Basic knowledge of production mechanisms of nano-engineered materials.
ContentNanotechnology is the basis of many main technological innovations of the 21st century. After more than twenty years of research, nanotechnologies are now increasingly employed for commercial use: they are used in hundreds of everyday consumer products, such as cosmetics, food, automotive, electronics and medical products. Nanoparticles can contribute to stronger, lighter, cleaner, smarter, better, etc. products.
Besides these positive effects, relatively little is still known about potential health and environmental effects and risks of such small nano-sized particles. Therefore, a lot of different industry customers are forced nowadays to monitor and regulate the size and concentration of nanoparticles in their nano-enabled products.
Above and beyond these regulatory requirements, most industries employing nanoparticles need to be able to online measure nanoparticles to meet their requirements towards quality control and production efficiency. All these requirements demand new precise, accurate, fast and innovative analysis methods to fully characterize nanoparticles in real-time and during the manufacturing process.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be provided
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: 529-0051-00 "Analytical Chemistry I (3. Semester)", 529-0058-00 "Analytical Chemistry II (4. Semester)" (or equivalent)
529-0055-00LMethods of Elemental Analysis Restricted registration - show details W6 credits6SG. Schwarz, D. Bleiner
AbstractSeveral methods of quantitative elemental analysis are characterized systematically in practical work within small groups and a analytical question is answered. The findings are reviewed, compared between groups and teaching material developed.
ObjectiveDeep practical experience and comparison of analytical methods and concepts in self-handled work and review.
ContentElementanalytische Methoden
Biological Chemistry
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0733-01LEnzymesW6 credits3GD. Hilvert
AbstractPrinciples of enzymatic catalysis, enzyme kinetics, mechanisms of enzyme-catalyzed reactions (group transfer reactions, carbon-carbon bond formation, eliminations, isomerisations and rearrangements), cofactor chemistry, enzymes in organic synthesis and the biosynthesis of natural products, catalytic antibodies.
ObjectiveOverview of enzymes, enzyme-catalyzed reactions and metabolic processes.
ContentPrinciples of enzymatic catalysis, enzyme kinetics, mechanisms of enzyme catalyzed reactions (group transfer reactions, carbon-carbon bond formation, eliminations, isomerisations and rearrangements), cofactor chemistry, enzymes in organic synthesis and the biosynthesis of natural products, catalytic antibodies.
Lecture notesA script will not be handed out.
LiteratureGeneral:
T. Bugg, An Introduction to Enzyme and Coenzyme Chemistry, Blackwell Science Ltd., Oxford, 1997.

In addition, citations from the original literature relevant to the individual lectures will be assigned weekly.
529-0735-01LChemical Aspects of BioimagingW6 credits3GP. Rivera Fuentes
AbstractThis course will introduce basic concepts of fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy applied to the observation of biological systems. The course will focus on the design, preparation and implementation of small-molecule and protein-based probes for biological investigations.
ObjectiveTo understand the basic chemical aspects of bioimaging and photoactivation in biology.
ContentPrinciples of fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy, fluorescent dyes and proteins, chemiluminescence, super-resolution microscopy, and fluorescent sensors.
Lecture notesHandouts, selected original literature, quizzes, and other materials will be provided electronically.
LiteratureJ. R. Lakowicz. Principles of Fluorescence Spectroscopy. Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers. 2006.

P. J. Walla. Modern Biophysical Chemistry: Detection and Analysis of Biomolecules. Wiley-VCH. 2014.

M. Chalfie; S. R. Kain (Eds.) Green Fluorescent Protein: Properties, Applications, and Protocols.
Wiley-Interscience. 2006.

R. W. Sabnis. Handbook of Fluorescent Dyes and Probes. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2015.

A. P. Demchenko. Introduction to Fluorescence Sensing. Springer Science. 2009.
  •  Page  1  of  2 Next page Last page     All