Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Computational Science and Engineering Master Information
Fields of Specialization
Robotics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0601-00LTheory of Robotics and Mechatronics Information W4 credits3GP. Korba, S. Stoeter
AbstractThis course provides an introduction and covers the fundamentals of the field, including rigid motions, homogeneous transformations, forward and inverse kinematics of multiple degree of freedom manipulators, velocity kinematics, motion planning, trajectory generation, sensing, vision, and control. It’s a requirement for the Robotics Vertiefung and for the Masters in Mechatronics and Microsystems.
ObjectiveRobotics is often viewed from three perspectives: perception (sensing), manipulation (affecting changes in the world), and cognition (intelligence). Robotic systems integrate aspects of all three of these areas. This course provides an introduction to the theory of robotics, and covers the fundamentals of the field, including rigid motions, homogeneous transformations, forward and inverse kinematics of multiple degree of freedom manipulators, velocity kinematics, motion planning, trajectory generation, sensing, vision, and control. This course is a requirement for the Robotics Vertiefung and for the Masters in Mechatronics and Microsystems.
ContentAn introduction to the theory of robotics, and covers the fundamentals of the field, including rigid motions, homogeneous transformations, forward and inverse kinematics of multiple degree of freedom manipulators, velocity kinematics, motion planning, trajectory generation, sensing, vision, and control.
Lecture notesavailable.
252-0535-00LAdvanced Machine Learning Information W8 credits3V + 2U + 2AJ. M. Buhmann
AbstractMachine learning algorithms provide analytical methods to search data sets for characteristic patterns. Typical tasks include the classification of data, function fitting and clustering, with applications in image and speech analysis, bioinformatics and exploratory data analysis. This course is accompanied by practical machine learning projects.
ObjectiveStudents will be familiarized with advanced concepts and algorithms for supervised and unsupervised learning; reinforce the statistics knowledge which is indispensible to solve modeling problems under uncertainty. Key concepts are the generalization ability of algorithms and systematic approaches to modeling and regularization. Machine learning projects will provide an opportunity to test the machine learning algorithms on real world data.
ContentThe theory of fundamental machine learning concepts is presented in the lecture, and illustrated with relevant applications. Students can deepen their understanding by solving both pen-and-paper and programming exercises, where they implement and apply famous algorithms to real-world data.

Topics covered in the lecture include:

Fundamentals:
What is data?
Bayesian Learning
Computational learning theory

Supervised learning:
Ensembles: Bagging and Boosting
Max Margin methods
Neural networks

Unsupservised learning:
Dimensionality reduction techniques
Clustering
Mixture Models
Non-parametric density estimation
Learning Dynamical Systems
Lecture notesNo lecture notes, but slides will be made available on the course webpage.
LiteratureC. Bishop. Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning. Springer 2007.

R. Duda, P. Hart, and D. Stork. Pattern Classification. John Wiley &
Sons, second edition, 2001.

T. Hastie, R. Tibshirani, and J. Friedman. The Elements of Statistical
Learning: Data Mining, Inference and Prediction. Springer, 2001.

L. Wasserman. All of Statistics: A Concise Course in Statistical
Inference. Springer, 2004.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course requires solid basic knowledge in analysis, statistics and numerical methods for CSE as well as practical programming experience for solving assignments.
Students should have followed at least "Introduction to Machine Learning" or an equivalent course offered by another institution.
263-5902-00LComputer Vision Information W6 credits3V + 1U + 1AM. Pollefeys, V. Ferrari, L. Van Gool
AbstractThe goal of this course is to provide students with a good understanding of computer vision and image analysis techniques. The main concepts and techniques will be studied in depth and practical algorithms and approaches will be discussed and explored through the exercises.
ObjectiveThe objectives of this course are:
1. To introduce the fundamental problems of computer vision.
2. To introduce the main concepts and techniques used to solve those.
3. To enable participants to implement solutions for reasonably complex problems.
4. To enable participants to make sense of the computer vision literature.
ContentCamera models and calibration, invariant features, Multiple-view geometry, Model fitting, Stereo Matching, Segmentation, 2D Shape matching, Shape from Silhouettes, Optical flow, Structure from motion, Tracking, Object recognition, Object category recognition
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is recommended that students have taken the Visual Computing lecture or a similar course introducing basic image processing concepts before taking this course.
263-3210-00LDeep Learning Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 300.
W4 credits2V + 1UF. Perez Cruz
AbstractDeep learning is an area within machine learning that deals with algorithms and models that automatically induce multi-level data representations.
ObjectiveIn recent years, deep learning and deep networks have significantly improved the state-of-the-art in many application domains such as computer vision, speech recognition, and natural language processing. This class will cover the mathematical foundations of deep learning and provide insights into model design, training, and validation. The main objective is a profound understanding of why these methods work and how. There will also be a rich set of hands-on tasks and practical projects to familiarize students with this emerging technology.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is an advanced level course that requires some basic background in machine learning. More importantly, students are expected to have a very solid mathematical foundation, including linear algebra, multivariate calculus, and probability. The course will make heavy use of mathematics and is not (!) meant to be an extended tutorial of how to train deep networks with tools like Torch or Tensorflow, although that may be a side benefit.

The participation in the course is subject to the following conditions:
1) The number of participants is limited to 300 students (MSc and PhDs).
2) Students must have taken the exam in Machine Learning (252-0535-00) or have acquired equivalent knowledge, see exhaustive list below:

Machine Learning
Link

Computational Intelligence Lab
Link

Learning and Intelligent Systems/Introduction to Machine Learning
Link

Statistical Learning Theory
Link

Computational Statistics
Link

Probabilistic Artificial Intelligence
Link

Data Mining: Learning from Large Data Sets
Link
151-0563-01LDynamic Programming and Optimal Control Information W4 credits2V + 1UR. D'Andrea
AbstractIntroduction to Dynamic Programming and Optimal Control.
ObjectiveCovers the fundamental concepts of Dynamic Programming & Optimal Control.
ContentDynamic Programming Algorithm; Deterministic Systems and Shortest Path Problems; Infinite Horizon Problems, Bellman Equation; Deterministic Continuous-Time Optimal Control.
LiteratureDynamic Programming and Optimal Control by Dimitri P. Bertsekas, Vol. I, 3rd edition, 2005, 558 pages, hardcover.
Prerequisites / NoticeRequirements: Knowledge of advanced calculus, introductory probability theory, and matrix-vector algebra.
151-0851-00LRobot Dynamics Information Restricted registration - show details W4 credits2V + 2UM. Hutter, R. Siegwart
AbstractWe will provide an overview on how to kinematically and dynamically model typical robotic systems such as robot arms, legged robots, rotary wing systems, or fixed wing.
ObjectiveThe primary objective of this course is that the student deepens an applied understanding of how to model the most common robotic systems. The student receives a solid background in kinematics, dynamics, and rotations of multi-body systems. On the basis of state of the art applications, he/she will learn all necessary tools to work in the field of design or control of robotic systems.
ContentThe course consists of three parts: First, we will refresh and deepen the student's knowledge in kinematics, dynamics, and rotations of multi-body systems. In this context, the learning material will build upon the courses for mechanics and dynamics available at ETH, with the particular focus on their application to robotic systems. The goal is to foster the conceptual understanding of similarities and differences among the various types of robots. In the second part, we will apply the learned material to classical robotic arms as well as legged systems and discuss kinematic constraints and interaction forces. In the third part, focus is put on modeling fixed wing aircraft, along with related design and control concepts. In this context, we also touch aerodynamics and flight mechanics to an extent typically required in robotics. The last part finally covers different helicopter types, with a focus on quadrotors and the coaxial configuration which we see today in many UAV applications. Case studies on all main topics provide the link to real applications and to the state of the art in robotics.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe contents of the following ETH Bachelor lectures or equivalent are assumed to be known: Mechanics and Dynamics, Control, Basics in Fluid Dynamics.
401-5860-00LSeminar in Robotics for CSEW4 credits2SR. Siegwart
AbstractThis course provides an opportunity to familiarize yourself with the advanced topics of robotics and mechatronics research. The study plan has to be discussed with the lecturer based on your specific interests and/or the relevant seminar series such as the IRIS's Robotics Seminars and BiRONZ lectures, for example.
ObjectiveThe students are familiar with the challenges of the fascinating and interdisciplinary field of Robotics and Mechatronics. They are introduced in the basics of independent non-experimental scientific research and are able to summarize and to present the results efficiently.
ContentThis 4 ECTS course requires each student to discuss a study plan with the lecturer and select minimum 10 relevant scientific publications to read through, or attend 5-10 lectures of the public robotics oriented seminars (e.g. Public robotics seminars such as the IRIS's Robotics Seminars Link, and BiRONZ lectures Link are good examples). At the end of semester, the results should be presented in an oral presentation and summarized in a report, which takes the discussion of the presentation into account.
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