Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2018

Energy Science and Technology Master Information
Master Studies (Programme Regulations 2018)
Core Courses
At least two core courses must be passed in each area.
All students must participate in the course offered in the area "Interdisciplinary Energy Management"
Electrical Power Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0122-00LIntroduction to Electric Power Transmission: System & TechnologyW6 credits4GC. Franck, G. Hug
AbstractIntroduction to theory and technology of electric power transmission systems.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, the student will be able to: describe the structure of electric power systems, name the most important components and describe what they are needed for, apply models for transformers and lines, explain the technology of overhead power lines, calculate stationary power flows, current and voltage transients and other basic parameters in simple power systems.
ContentStructure of electric power systems, transformer and power line models, analysis of and power flow calculation in basic systems, symmetrical and unsymmetrical three-phase systems, transient current and voltage processes, technology and principle of electric power systems.
Lecture notesLecture script in English, exercises and sample solutions, translation of important vocabulary: english-german.
227-1635-00LElectric Circuits
Students without a background in Electrical Engineering must take "Electric Circuits" before taking "Introduction to Electric Power Transmission: System & Technology"
W4 credits3GM. Zima
AbstractIntroduction to analysis methods and network theorems to describe operation of electric circuits. Theoretical foundations are essential for the analysis of the electric power transmission and distribution grids as well as many modern technological devices – consumer electronics, control systems, computers and communications.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, the student will be able to: understand variables in electric circuits, evaluate possible approaches and analyse simple electric circuits with RLC elements, apply circuit theorems to simple meshed circuits, analyze AC circuits in a steady state and understand the connection of the explained principles to the modelling of the 3-phase electric power systems.
ContentCourse will introduce electric circuits variables, circuit elements (resistive, inductive, capacitive), resistive circuits and theorems (Kirchhoffs’ laws, Norton and Thevenin equivalents), nodal and mesh analysis, superposition principle; it will continue by discussing the complete response circuits (RLC), sinusoidal analysis – ac steady state (complex power, reactive, active power) and conclude with the introduction to 3-phase analysis;
Mathematical foundations of the circuit analysis, such as matrix operations and complex numbers will be briefly reviewed.
This course is targeting students who have no prior background in electrical engineering.
Lecture noteslecture and exercises slides will be distributed after each lecture; additional materials to be accessed online (wileyplus)
LiteratureRichard C. Dorf, James A. Svoboda
Introduction to Electric Circuits, 9th Edition
Online materials: Link
Lecture slides and exercises slides
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is intended for students outside of D-ITET. No prior course in electrical engineering is required
Energy Flows and Processes
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0293-00LCombustion and Reactive Processes in Energy and Materials TechnologyW4 credits2V + 1U + 2AK. Boulouchos, F.  Ernst, N. Noiray, Y. Wright
AbstractThe students should become familiar with the fundamentals and with application examples of chemically reactive processes in energy conversion (combustion engines in particular) as well as the synthesis of new materials.
ObjectiveThe students should become familiar with the fundamentals and with application examples of chemically reactive processes in energy conversion (combustion engines in particular) as well as the synthesis of new materials. The lecture is part of the focus "Energy, Flows & Processes" on the Bachelor level and is recommended as a basis for a future Master in the area of energy. It is also a facultative lecture on Master level in Energy Science and Technology and Process Engineering.
ContentReaction kinetics, fuel oxidation mechanisms, premixed and diffusion laminar flames, two-phase-flows, turbulence and turbulent combustion, pollutant formation, applications in combustion engines. Synthesis of materials in flame processes: particles, pigments and nanoparticles. Fundamentals of design and optimization of flame reactors, effect of reactant mixing on product characteristics. Tailoring of products made in flame spray pyrolysis.
Lecture notesNo script available. Instead, material will be provided in lecture slides and the following text book (which can be downloaded for free) will be followed:

J. Warnatz, U. Maas, R.W. Dibble, "Combustion:Physical and Chemical Fundamentals, Modeling and Simulation, Experiments, Pollutant Formation", Springer-Verlag, 1997.

Teaching language, assignments and lecture slides in English
LiteratureJ. Warnatz, U. Maas, R.W. Dibble, "Combustion:Physical and Chemical Fundamentals, Modeling and Simulation, Experiments, Pollutant Formation", Springer-Verlag, 1997.

I. Glassman, Combustion, 3rd edition, Academic Press, 1996.
151-1633-00LEnergy Conversion
This course is intended for students outside of D-MAVT.
W4 credits3GI. Karlin, G. Sansavini
AbstractThis course is tailored to provide the students with a common introduction on thermodynamics and heat transfer. Students can gain a basic understanding of energy, energy interactions, and various mechanisms of heat transfer as well as their linkage to energy conversion technologies.
ObjectiveStudents will be able analyze and evaluate energy conversion and heat exchange processes from the thermodynamic perspective.

1. They will be able to describe a thermodynamic system and its state in the using phase diagrams for pure substances and to apply the first law of thermodynamics, energy balances, and mechanisms of energy transfer to or from a system.

2. Students will be able to describe processes/changes of state in the phase diagrams and evaluate start and end states and the exchange of heat and power in the process.

3. They will be able to introduce and apply the entropy and exergy balance to closed and open systems.

4. They will be able to apply the second law of thermodynamics to power cycles and processes, and determine the expressions for the thermal efficiencies and coefficients of performance for heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. They will be able to evaluate the thermodynamic performance of cycles using phase diagrams and critically analyze the different parts of cycles and propose improvements to their efficiency.

5. Students will be able to apply energy balances to reacting systems for both steady-flow control volumes and fixed mass systems.

6. At the end of the course, they will be able to apply the basic mechanisms of heat transfer (conduction, convection, and radiation), and Fourier's law of heat conduction, Newton's law of cooling, and the Stefan–Boltzmann law of radiation. Finally, students will be able to solve various heat transfer problems encountered in practice.
Content1. Thermodynamic systems, states and state variables
2. Properties of substances: Water, air and ideal gas
3. Energy conservation in closed and open systems: work, internal energy, heat and enthalpy
4. Second law of thermodynamics and entropy
5. Energy analysis of steam power cycles
6. Energy analysis of gas power cycles
7. Refrigeration and heat pump cycles
8. Maximal work and exergy analysis
9. Mixtures and psychrometry
10. Chemical reactions and combustion systems
11. Heat transfer
Lecture notesLecture slides and supplementary documentation will be available online.
LiteratureThermodynamics: An Engineering Approach, by Cengel, Y. A. and Boles, M. A., McGraw Hill
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is intended for students outside of D-MAVT.

Students are assumed to have an adequate background in calculus, physics, and engineering mechanics.
Energy Economics and Policy
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
363-0503-00LPrinciples of Microeconomics
GESS (Science in Perspective): Suitable for Master students.
Bachelor students should take the course ‚Einführung in die Mikroökonomie (363-1109-00L)‘.
W3 credits2GM. Filippini
AbstractThe course introduces basic principles, problems and approaches of microeconomics. This provides them with reflective and contextual knowledge on how societies use scarce resources to produce goods and services and distribute them among themselves.
ObjectiveThe learning objectives of the course are:

(1) Students must be able to discuss basic principles, problems and approaches in microeconomics. (2) Students can analyse and explain simple economic principles in a market using supply and demand graphs. (3) Students can contrast different market structures and describe firm and consumer behaviour. (4) Students can identify market failures such as externalities related to market activities and illustrate how these affect the economy as a whole. (5) Students can also recognize behavioural failures within a market and discuss basic concepts related to behavioural economics. (6) Students can apply simple mathematical treatment of some basic concepts and can solve utility maximisation and cost minimisation problems.
Lecture notesLecture notes, exercises and reference material can be downloaded from Moodle.
LiteratureN. Gregory Mankiw and Mark P. Taylor (2017), "Economics", 4th edition, South-Western Cengage Learning.
The book can also be used for the course 'Principles of Macroeconomics' (Sturm)

For students taking only the course 'Principles of Microeconomics' there is a shorter version of the same book:
N. Gregory Mankiw and Mark P. Taylor (2017), "Microeconomics", 4th edition, South-Western Cengage Learning.

Complementary:
1. R. Pindyck and D. Rubinfeld (2018), "Microeconomics", 9th edition, Pearson Education.
2. Varian, H.R. (2014), "Intermediate Microeconomics", 9th edition, Norton & Company
Interdisciplinary Energy Management
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1631-10LCase Studies: Energy Systems and Technology: Part 1 Restricted registration - show details
Only for Energy Science and Technology MSc.
O2 credits4GC. Franck, C. Schaffner
AbstractThis course will allow the students to get an interdisciplinary overview of the “Energy” topic. It will explore the challenges to build a sustainable energy system for the future. This will be done through the means of case studies that the students have to work on. These case studies will be provided by industry partners.
ObjectiveThe students will understand the different aspects involved in designing solutions for a sustainable future energy system. They will have experience in collaborating in interdisciplinary teams. They will have an understanding on how industry is approaching new solutions.
Lecture notesDescriptions of case studies.
Electives
» Electives can be found here.
Industrial Internship
For MEST students enrolled under the 2018 regulations
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1650-10LInternship in Industry Restricted registration - show details
Only for MEST students enrolled under the 2018 regulations
O12 creditsexternal organisers
AbstractThe main objective of the 12-week internship is to expose master's students to the industrial work environment. During this period, students have the opportunity to be involved in on-going projects at the host institution.
Objectivesee above
Semester Project
For MEST students enrolled under the 2018 regulations
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1101-00LHow to Write Scientific Texts in Engineering Sciences
Strongly recommended prerequisite for Semester Projects and Master Theses at D-ITET (MSc BME, MSc EEIT, MSc EST).
E-0 creditsJ. Leuthold
AbstractThe 4 hour lecture covers the basics of writing & presenting a scientific text. The focus will be on the structure and elements of a scientific text and not on the language. Citation rules, good practice of scientific writing and an overview on software tools will be part of the training.
The lecture will be thought on two afternoons. Some exercises will be built into the lecture.
ObjectiveKnowledge on structure and content of a scientific text. The course further is arranged to stimulate a discussion on how to properly write a legible scientific text versus writing an interesting novel. We will further discuss the practice of properly citing and critically reflect on recent plagiarism allegations.
Content* Topic 1: Structure of a Scientific Text (The Title, the author list, the abstract, State-of-the Art, the "in this paper" paragraph, the scientific part, the summary, Equations, Figures).

* Topic 2: Power Point Presentations.

* Topic 3: Citation Rules and Citation Software.

* Topic 4: Guidelines for Research Integrity.
LiteratureETH "Citation Etiquette", see Link.

ETH Guidlines on "Guidelines for Research Integrity", see Link > Education > > Contacts, links & documents > Forms and documents > Brochures / guides.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should already have a Bachelor degree and plan to do either a semester project or a master thesis in the immediate future.
227-1671-10LSemester Project
Only for MEST students enrolled under the 2018 regulations
O12 credits20ASupervisors
AbstractThe semester project is designed to train the students in solving specific problems from the field of Energy Science & Technology. This project uses the technical and social skills acquired during the master's program. The semester project ist advised by a professor and must be approved in advance by the tutor.
Objectivesee above
Master Studies (Programme Regulations 2007)
Core Subjects
Compulsory core courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-1633-00LEnergy Conversion
This course is intended for students outside of D-MAVT.
O4 credits3GI. Karlin, G. Sansavini
AbstractThis course is tailored to provide the students with a common introduction on thermodynamics and heat transfer. Students can gain a basic understanding of energy, energy interactions, and various mechanisms of heat transfer as well as their linkage to energy conversion technologies.
ObjectiveStudents will be able analyze and evaluate energy conversion and heat exchange processes from the thermodynamic perspective.

1. They will be able to describe a thermodynamic system and its state in the using phase diagrams for pure substances and to apply the first law of thermodynamics, energy balances, and mechanisms of energy transfer to or from a system.

2. Students will be able to describe processes/changes of state in the phase diagrams and evaluate start and end states and the exchange of heat and power in the process.

3. They will be able to introduce and apply the entropy and exergy balance to closed and open systems.

4. They will be able to apply the second law of thermodynamics to power cycles and processes, and determine the expressions for the thermal efficiencies and coefficients of performance for heat engines, heat pumps, and refrigerators. They will be able to evaluate the thermodynamic performance of cycles using phase diagrams and critically analyze the different parts of cycles and propose improvements to their efficiency.

5. Students will be able to apply energy balances to reacting systems for both steady-flow control volumes and fixed mass systems.

6. At the end of the course, they will be able to apply the basic mechanisms of heat transfer (conduction, convection, and radiation), and Fourier's law of heat conduction, Newton's law of cooling, and the Stefan–Boltzmann law of radiation. Finally, students will be able to solve various heat transfer problems encountered in practice.
Content1. Thermodynamic systems, states and state variables
2. Properties of substances: Water, air and ideal gas
3. Energy conservation in closed and open systems: work, internal energy, heat and enthalpy
4. Second law of thermodynamics and entropy
5. Energy analysis of steam power cycles
6. Energy analysis of gas power cycles
7. Refrigeration and heat pump cycles
8. Maximal work and exergy analysis
9. Mixtures and psychrometry
10. Chemical reactions and combustion systems
11. Heat transfer
Lecture notesLecture slides and supplementary documentation will be available online.
LiteratureThermodynamics: An Engineering Approach, by Cengel, Y. A. and Boles, M. A., McGraw Hill
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is intended for students outside of D-MAVT.

Students are assumed to have an adequate background in calculus, physics, and engineering mechanics.
227-0122-00LIntroduction to Electric Power Transmission: System & TechnologyO6 credits4GC. Franck, G. Hug
AbstractIntroduction to theory and technology of electric power transmission systems.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, the student will be able to: describe the structure of electric power systems, name the most important components and describe what they are needed for, apply models for transformers and lines, explain the technology of overhead power lines, calculate stationary power flows, current and voltage transients and other basic parameters in simple power systems.
ContentStructure of electric power systems, transformer and power line models, analysis of and power flow calculation in basic systems, symmetrical and unsymmetrical three-phase systems, transient current and voltage processes, technology and principle of electric power systems.
Lecture notesLecture script in English, exercises and sample solutions, translation of important vocabulary: english-german.
Elective Core Courses
» Elective core courses can be found here.
Multidisciplinary Courses
With the consent of the tutor, the students are free to choose individually from the entire course offer of ETH Zürich.
» Course Catalogue of ETH Zurich
Industrial Internship
For MEST students enrolled under the 2007 regulations
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1650-00LInternship in Industry Restricted registration - show details
Only for MEST students enrolled under the 2007 regulations
O8 creditsexternal organisers
AbstractThe main objective of the 12-week internship is to expose master's students to the industrial work environment. During this period, students have the opportunity to be involved in on-going projects at the host institution.
Objectivesee above
Semester Project
For MEST students enrolled under the 2007 regulations
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1101-00LHow to Write Scientific Texts in Engineering Sciences
Strongly recommended prerequisite for Semester Projects and Master Theses at D-ITET (MSc BME, MSc EEIT, MSc EST).
E-0 creditsJ. Leuthold
AbstractThe 4 hour lecture covers the basics of writing & presenting a scientific text. The focus will be on the structure and elements of a scientific text and not on the language. Citation rules, good practice of scientific writing and an overview on software tools will be part of the training.
The lecture will be thought on two afternoons. Some exercises will be built into the lecture.
ObjectiveKnowledge on structure and content of a scientific text. The course further is arranged to stimulate a discussion on how to properly write a legible scientific text versus writing an interesting novel. We will further discuss the practice of properly citing and critically reflect on recent plagiarism allegations.
Content* Topic 1: Structure of a Scientific Text (The Title, the author list, the abstract, State-of-the Art, the "in this paper" paragraph, the scientific part, the summary, Equations, Figures).

* Topic 2: Power Point Presentations.

* Topic 3: Citation Rules and Citation Software.

* Topic 4: Guidelines for Research Integrity.
LiteratureETH "Citation Etiquette", see Link.

ETH Guidlines on "Guidelines for Research Integrity", see Link > Education > > Contacts, links & documents > Forms and documents > Brochures / guides.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents should already have a Bachelor degree and plan to do either a semester project or a master thesis in the immediate future.
227-1671-00LSemester Project
Only for MEST students enrolled under the 2007 regulations.
O8 credits20ASupervisors
AbstractThe semester project is designed to train the students in solving specific problems from the field of Energy Science & Technology. This project uses the technical and social skills acquired during the master's program. The semester project ist advised by a professor and must be approved in advance by the tutor.
Objectivesee above
Electives
- Elective Core Courses for the 2007 MEST regulations
- Electives for the 2018 MEST regulations

These courses are particularly recommended, other ETH-courses from the field of Energy Science and Technology at large may be chosen in accordance with your tutor.
Electrical Power Engineering
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0113-00LPower Electronics Information W6 credits4GJ. W. Kolar
AbstractFields of application of power electronic systems. Principle of operation of basic pulse-width modulated and line-commutated power electronic converters, analysis of the operating behavior and of the control oriented behavior, converter design. Reduction of effects of line-commutated rectifiers on the mains, electromagnetic compatibility.
ObjectiveFields of application of power electronic systems. Principle of operation of basic pulse-width modulated and line-commutated power electronic converters, analysis of the operating behavior and of the controloriented behavior, converter design. Reduction of effects of line-commutated rectifiers on the mains, electromagnetic compatibility.
ContentBasic structure of power electronic systems, applications. DC/DC converters, high frequency isolation, control oriented modeling / state-space averaging and PWM switch model. Power semiconductors, non-idealities, cooling. Magnetic components, skin and proximity effect, design. Electromagnetic compatibility. Single-phase diode bridge with capacitive smoothing, effects on the mains, power factor correction / PWM rectifier. Pulse-width modulated single-phase and three-phase full bridge converter with impressed DC voltage, modulation schemes, space vector calculus. Line-commutated single-phase full bridge with impressed output current, commutation, phase-control, inverter operation, commutation failure. Line-commutated three-phase full bridge converter, impressed output voltage, impressed output current / phase-control. Parallel connection of three-phase line-commutated thyristor circuits, inter-phase transformer. Anti-parallel connection of three-phase line-commutated thyristor bridge circuits, four-quadrant DC motor drive. Load-resonant converters, state plane analysis.
Lecture notesLecture notes and associated exercises including correct answers, simulation program for interactive self-learning including visualization/animation features.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Basic knowledge of electric circuit analysis and signal theory.
227-0117-00LHigh Voltage Engineering II: Insulation Technology
The lectures High Voltage Engineering I: Experimental Techniques (227-0117-10L) and High Voltage Engineering II: Insulation Technology (227-0117-00L) can be taken independently from one another.
W6 credits4GC. Franck, U. Straumann
AbstractUnderstanding of the fundamental phenomena and principles connected with the occurrence of extensive electric field strengths. This knowledge is applied to the dimensioning of equipment of electric power systems. Methods of computer-modeling in use today are presented and applied within the framework of the exercises.
ObjectiveThe students know the fundamental phenomena and principles connected with the occurrence of extensive electric field strengths. They comprehend the different mechanisms leading to the failure of insulation systems and are able to apply failure criteria on the dimensioning of high voltage components. They have the ability to identify of weak spots in insulation systems and to name possibilities for improvement. Further they know the different insulation systems and their dimensioning in practice.
Content- discussion of the field equations relevant for high voltage engineering.
- analytical and numerical solutions/solving of this equations, as well as the derivation of the important equivalent circuits for the description of the fields and losses in insulations
- introduction to kinetic theory of gases
- mechanisms of the breakdown in gaseous, liquid and solid insulations, as well as insulation systems
- methods for the mathematical determination of the electric withstand of gaseous, liquid and solid insulations
- application of the expertise on high voltage components
- excursions to manufacturers of high voltage components
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureA. Küchler, Hochspannungstechnik, Springer Berlin, 4. Auflage, 2017 (ISBN: 978-3-662-54699-4)
227-0247-00LPower Electronic Systems I Information W6 credits4GJ. W. Kolar
AbstractBasics of the switching behavior, gate drive and snubber circuits of power semiconductors are discussed. Soft-switching and resonant DC/DC converters are analyzed in detail and high frequency loss mechanisms of magnetic components are explained. Space vector modulation of three-phase inverters is introduced and the main power components are designed for typical industry applications.
ObjectiveDetailed understanding of the principle of operation and modulation of advanced power electronics converter systems, especially of zero voltage switching and zero current switching non-isolated and isolated DC/DC converter systems and three-phase voltage DC link inverter systems. Furthermore, the course should convey knowledge on the switching frequency related losses of power semiconductors and inductive power components and introduce the concept of space vector calculus which provides a basis for the comprehensive discussion of three-phase PWM converters systems in the lecture Power Electronic Systems II.
ContentBasics of the switching behavior and gate drive circuits of power semiconductor devices and auxiliary circuits for minimizing the switching losses are explained. Furthermore, zero voltage switching, zero current switching, and resonant DC/DC converters are discussed in detail; the operating behavior of isolated full-bridge DC/DC converters is detailed for different secondary side rectifier topologies; high frequency loss mechanisms of magnetic components of converter circuits are explained and approximate calculation methods are presented; the concept of space vector calculus for analyzing three-phase systems is introduced; finally, phase-oriented and space vector modulation of three-phase inverter systems are discussed related to voltage DC link inverter systems and the design of the main power components based on analytical calculations is explained.
Lecture notesLecture notes and associated exercises including correct answers, simulation program for interactive self-learning including visualization/animation features.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Introductory course on power electronics.
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