Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Master Information
More informations at: Link
Master Studies (Programme Regulations 2017)
Core Courses
Please note that the list of core courses is a closed list. Other courses cannot be added to the core course category in the study plan. Also the assignments of courses to core subcategories cannot be changed.
Students need to pass at least one course in each core subcategory.
A total of 40 ECTS needs to be acquired in the core course category.
Bioinformatics
Please note that all Bioinformatics core courses are offered in the autumn semester
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
636-0009-00LEvolutionary DynamicsW6 credits2V + 1UN. Beerenwinkel
AbstractEvolutionary dynamics is concerned with the mathematical principles according to which life has evolved. This course offers an introduction to mathematical modeling of evolution, including deterministic and stochastic models.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to understand and to appreciate mathematical models and computational methods that provide insight into the evolutionary process.
ContentEvolution is the one theory that encompasses all of biology. It provides a single, unifying concept to understand the living systems that we observe today. We will introduce several types of mathematical models of evolution to describe gene frequency changes over time in the context of different biological systems, focusing on asexual populations. Viruses and cancer cells provide the most prominent examples of such systems and they are at the same time of great biomedical interest. The course will cover some classical mathematical population genetics and population dynamics, and also introduce several new approaches. This is reflected in a diverse set of mathematical concepts which make their appearance throughout the course, all of which are introduced from scratch. Topics covered include the quasispecies equation, evolution of HIV, evolutionary game theory, birth-death processes, evolutionary stability, evolutionary graph theory, somatic evolution of cancer, stochastic tunneling, cell differentiation, hematopoietic tumor stem cells, genetic progression of cancer and the speed of adaptation, diffusion theory, fitness landscapes, neutral networks, branching processes, evolutionary escape, and epistasis.
Lecture notesNo.
Literature- Evolutionary Dynamics. Martin A. Nowak. The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2006.
- Evolutionary Theory: Mathematical and Conceptual Foundations. Sean H. Rice. Sinauer Associates, Inc., 2004.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Basic mathematics (linear algebra, calculus, probability)
636-0017-00LComputational Biology Information W6 credits3G + 2AC. Magnus, T. Stadler, T. Vaughan
AbstractThe aim of the course is to provide up-to-date knowledge on how we can study biological processes using genetic sequencing data. Computational algorithms extracting biological information from genetic sequence data are discussed, and statistical tools to understand this information in detail are introduced.
ObjectiveAttendees will learn which information is contained in genetic sequencing data and how to extract information from this data using computational tools. The main concepts introduced are:
* stochastic models in molecular evolution
* phylogenetic & phylodynamic inference
* maximum likelihood and Bayesian statistics
Attendees will apply these concepts to a number of applications yielding biological insight into:
* epidemiology
* pathogen evolution
* macroevolution of species
ContentThe course consists of four parts. We first introduce modern genetic sequencing technology, and algorithms to obtain sequence alignments from the output of the sequencers. We then present methods for direct alignment analysis using approaches such as BLAST and GWAS. Second, we introduce mechanisms and concepts of molecular evolution, i.e. we discuss how genetic sequences change over time. Third, we employ evolutionary concepts to infer ancestral relationships between organisms based on their genetic sequences, i.e. we discuss methods to infer genealogies and phylogenies. Lastly, we introduce the field of phylodynamics. The aim of phylodynamics is to understand and quantify the population dynamic processes (such as transmission in epidemiology or speciation & extinction in macroevolution) based on a phylogeny. Throughout the class, the models and methods are illustrated on different datasets giving insight into the epidemiology and evolution of a range of infectious diseases (e.g. HIV, HCV, influenza, Ebola). Applications of the methods to the field of macroevolution provide insight into the evolution and ecology of different species clades. Students will be trained in the algorithms and their application both on paper and in silico as part of the exercises.
Lecture notesLecture slides will be available on moodle.
LiteratureThe course is not based on any of the textbooks below, but they are excellent choices as accompanying material:
* Yang, Z. 2006. Computational Molecular Evolution.
* Felsenstein, J. 2004. Inferring Phylogenies.
* Semple, C. & Steel, M. 2003. Phylogenetics.
* Drummond, A. & Bouckaert, R. 2015. Bayesian evolutionary analysis with BEAST.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in linear algebra, analysis, and statistics will be helpful. Programming in R will be required for the "Central Element". We provide an R tutorial and help sessions during the first two weeks of class to learn the required skills.
262-5120-00LPrinciples of Evolution: Theory (University of Zurich) Information
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: BIO351

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
Link
W6 credits3VUniversity lecturers
Abstract"Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution".
Evolutionary theory and methods are essential in all branches of modern
biology.
ObjectiveSubject specific skills:
By the end of the course, students will be able to:
o describe basic evolutionary theory and its applications
o discuss ongoing debates in evolutionary biology
o critically assess the presentation of evolutionary research in
the popular media

Key skills:
By the end of the course, students will be able to:
o approach biological questions from an evolutionary perspective
ContentThis course will provide a broad overview of current evolutionary thought, including the mechanisms of evolutionary change,
adaptation and the history of life and will involve practical field and lab work as well as lecture material.
262-6100-00LEvolutionary GeneticsW6 credits5Gexternal organisers
Abstract
Objective
262-6110-00LBioinformatics AlgorithmsW4 credits3Gexternal organisers
Abstract
Objective
Biophysics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-0307-00LMolecular and Structural Biology I: Protein Structure and Function Information
D-BIOL students are obliged to take part I and part II (next semester) as a two-semester course
W3 credits2VR. Glockshuber, K. Locher, E. Weber-Ban
AbstractBiophysics of protein folding, membrane proteins and biophysics of membranes, enzymatic catalysis, catalytic RNA and RNAi, current topics in protein biophysics and structural biology.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of structure-function relationships in proteins and in protein folding, detailed understanding of biophysics and physical methods as well as modern methods for protein purification and microanalytics.
Lecture notesScripts on the individual topics can be found under Link.
LiteratureBasics:
- Creighton, T.E., Proteins, Freeman, (1993)
- Fersht, A., Enzyme, Structure and Mechanism in Protein Science (1999), Freeman.
- Berg, Tymoczko, Stryer: Biochemistry (5th edition), Freeman (2001).

Current topics: References will be given during the lectures.

.
262-6120-00LMolecular Biophysics IW2 credits2Vexternal organisers
Abstract
Objective
Biosystems
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
636-0007-00LComputational Systems Biology Information W6 credits3V + 2UJ. Stelling
AbstractStudy of fundamental concepts, models and computational methods for the analysis of complex biological networks. Topics: Systems approaches in biology, biology and reaction network fundamentals, modeling and simulation approaches (topological, probabilistic, stoichiometric, qualitative, linear / nonlinear ODEs, stochastic), and systems analysis (complexity reduction, stability, identification).
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to provide an introductory overview of mathematical and computational methods for the modeling, simulation and analysis of biological networks.
ContentBiology has witnessed an unprecedented increase in experimental data and, correspondingly, an increased need for computational methods to analyze this data. The explosion of sequenced genomes, and subsequently, of bioinformatics methods for the storage, analysis and comparison of genetic sequences provides a prominent example. Recently, however, an additional area of research, captured by the label "Systems Biology", focuses on how networks, which are more than the mere sum of their parts' properties, establish biological functions. This is essentially a task of reverse engineering. The aim of this course is to provide an introductory overview of corresponding computational methods for the modeling, simulation and analysis of biological networks. We will start with an introduction into the basic units, functions and design principles that are relevant for biology at the level of individual cells. Making extensive use of example systems, the course will then focus on methods and algorithms that allow for the investigation of biological networks with increasing detail. These include (i) graph theoretical approaches for revealing large-scale network organization, (ii) probabilistic (Bayesian) network representations, (iii) structural network analysis based on reaction stoichiometries, (iv) qualitative methods for dynamic modeling and simulation (Boolean and piece-wise linear approaches), (v) mechanistic modeling using ordinary differential equations (ODEs) and finally (vi) stochastic simulation methods.
Lecture notesLink
LiteratureU. Alon, An introduction to systems biology. Chapman & Hall / CRC, 2006.

Z. Szallasi et al. (eds.), System modeling in cellular biology. MIT Press, 2006.
636-0706-00LSpatio-Temporal Modelling in Biology Information W4 credits3GD. Iber
AbstractThis course focuses on modeling spatio-temporal problems in biology, in particular on the cell and tissue level. The main focus is on mechanisms and concepts, but mathematical and numerical techniques are introduced as required. Biological examples discussed in the course provide an introduction to key concepts in developmental biology.
ObjectiveStudents will learn state-of-the-art approaches to modelling spatial effects in dynamical biological systems. The course provides an introduction to dynamical system, and covers the mathematical analysis of pattern formation in growing, developing systems, as well as the description of mechanical effects at the cell and tissue level. The course also provides an introduction to image-based modelling, i.e. the use of microscopy data for model development and testing. The course covers classic as well as current approaches and exposes students to open problems in the field. In this way, the course seeks to prepare students to conduct research in the field. The course prepares students for research in developmental biology, as well as for applications in tissue engineering, and for biomedical research.
ContentLECTURES
1. Introduction to Modelling in Biology (Sep 22)
Sep 29th: NO LECTURE & NO TUTORIAL
2. Dynamical Systems (Oct 6)
3. Morphogen Gradients (Oct 13)
4. Mathematical Description of Growing Biological Systems (Oct 20)
5. Travelling Waves & Wave Pinning (Oct 27th)
6 Turing Patterns (Nov 3)
Nov 10th: NO LECTURE & NO TUTORIAL (ETH FACULTY RETREAT)
7. Chemotaxis & Branching Processes (Nov 17th)
8. Image-Based Modelling (Nov 24th )
9. Tissue Mechanics (Dec 1st)
10. Growth Control (Dec 8th)
11. Cell-cell Signalling (Dec 15th - Dr Boareto)
12. Summary (Dec 22nd)

TUTORIALS
Sep 29: Mathematical Methods required for the course
Oct 6: Case Study: I: Dorso-ventral axis formation
Oct 13: Dynamical Systems
Oct 20: Morphogen Gradients
Oct 27: Growing Domains
Nov 3: Travelling Waves
Nov 17: Turing Patterns
Nov 24: Chemotaxis & Branching Processes
Dec 1: Case Study II: Organogenesis & Image-based Modelling
Dec 8: Tissue Mechanics
Dec 15: Cell-cell Signalling
Dec 22: Summary, Open Questions & Mock Exam
Lecture notesAll lecture material will be made available online
Link
LiteratureThe lecture course is not based on any textbook. The following textbooks are related to some of its content. The textbooks may be of interest for further reading, but are not necessary to follow the course:

Murray, Mathematical Biology, Springer
Forgacs and Newman, Biological Physics of the Developing Embryo, CUP
Keener and Sneyd, Mathematical Physiology, Springer
Fall et al, Computational Cell Biology, Springer
Szallasi et al, System Modeling in Cellular Biology, MIT Press
Wolkenhauer, Systems Biology
Kreyszig, Engineering Mathematics, Wiley
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is self-contained. The course assumes no background in biology but a good foundation regarding mathematical and computational techniques.
262-6130-00LComputational Systems BiologyW6 credits3Gexternal organisers
Abstract
Objective
Data Science
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
636-0018-00LData Mining IW6 credits3G + 2AK. M. Borgwardt
AbstractData Mining, the search for statistical dependencies in large databases, is of utmost important in modern society, in particular in biological and medical research. This course provides an introduction to the key problems, concepts, and algorithms in data mining, and the applications of data mining in computational biology.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is that the participants gain an understanding of data mining problems and algorithms to solve these problems, in particular in biological and medical applications.
ContentThe goal of the field of data mining is to find patterns and statistical dependencies in large databases, to gain an understanding of the underlying system from which the data were obtained. In computational biology, data mining contributes to the analysis of vast experimental data generated by high-throughput technologies, and thereby enables the generation of new hypotheses.

In this course, we will present the algorithmic foundations of data mining and its applications in computational biology. The course will feature an introduction to popular data mining problems and algorithms, reaching from classification via clustering to feature selection. This course is intended for both students who are interested in applying data mining algorithms and students who would like to gain an understanding of the key algorithmic concepts in data mining.

Tentative list of topics:

1. Distance functions
2. Classification
3. Clustering
4. Feature Selection
Lecture notesCourse material will be provided in form of slides.
LiteratureWill be provided during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic understanding of mathematics, as taught in basic mathematics courses at the Bachelor's level.
401-6282-00LStatistical Analysis of High-Throughput Genomic and Transcriptomic Data (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: STA426

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
Link
W5 credits3GH. Rehrauer, M. Robinson
AbstractA range of topics will be covered, including basic molecular biology, genomics technologies and in particular, a wide range of statistical and computational methods that have been used in the analysis of DNA microarray and high throughput sequencing experiments.
Objective-Understand the fundamental "scientific process" in the field of Statistical Bioinformatics
-Be equipped with the skills/tools to preprocess genomic data (Unix, Bioconductor, mapping, etc.) and ensure reproducible research (Sweave)
-Have a general knowledge of the types of data and biological applications encountered with microarray and sequencing data
-Have the general knowledge of the range of statistical methods that get used with microarray and sequencing data
-Gain the ability to apply statistical methods/knowledge/software to a collaborative biological project
-Gain the ability to critical assess the statistical bioinformatics literature
-Write a coherent summary of a bioinformatics problem and its solution in statistical terms
ContentLectures will include: microarray preprocessing; normalization; exploratory data analysis techniques such as clustering, PCA and multidimensional scaling; Controlling error rates of statistical tests (FPR versus FDR versus FWER); limma (linear models for microarray analysis); mapping algorithms (for RNA/ChIP-seq); RNA-seq quantification; statistical analyses for differential count data; isoform switching; epigenomics data including DNA methylation; gene set analyses; classification
Lecture notesLecture notes, published manuscripts
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Basic knowlegde of the programming language R, sufficient knowledge in statistics

Former course title: Statistical Methods for the Analysis of Microarray and Short-Read Sequencing Data
252-0535-00LMachine Learning Information W8 credits3V + 2U + 2AJ. M. Buhmann
AbstractMachine learning algorithms provide analytical methods to search data sets for characteristic patterns. Typical tasks include the classification of data, function fitting and clustering, with applications in image and speech analysis, bioinformatics and exploratory data analysis. This course is accompanied by practical machine learning projects.
ObjectiveStudents will be familiarized with the most important concepts and algorithms for supervised and unsupervised learning; reinforce the statistics knowledge which is indispensible to solve modeling problems under uncertainty. Key concepts are the generalization ability of algorithms and systematic approaches to modeling and regularization. A machine learning project will provide an opportunity to test the machine learning algorithms on real world data.
ContentThe theory of fundamental machine learning concepts is presented in the lecture, and illustrated with relevant applications. Students can deepen their understanding by solving both pen-and-paper and programming exercises, where they implement and apply famous algorithms to real-world data.

Topics covered in the lecture include:

- Bayesian theory of optimal decisions
- Maximum likelihood and Bayesian parameter inference
- Classification with discriminant functions: Perceptrons, Fisher's LDA and support vector machines (SVM)
- Ensemble methods: Bagging and Boosting
- Regression: least squares, ridge and LASSO penalization, non-linear regression and the bias-variance trade-off
- Non parametric density estimation: Parzen windows, nearest nieghbour
- Dimension reduction: principal component analysis (PCA) and beyond
Lecture notesNo lecture notes, but slides will be made available on the course webpage.
LiteratureC. Bishop. Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning. Springer 2007.

R. Duda, P. Hart, and D. Stork. Pattern Classification. John Wiley &
Sons, second edition, 2001.

T. Hastie, R. Tibshirani, and J. Friedman. The Elements of Statistical
Learning: Data Mining, Inference and Prediction. Springer, 2001.

L. Wasserman. All of Statistics: A Concise Course in Statistical
Inference. Springer, 2004.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course requires solid basic knowledge in analysis, statistics and numerical methods for CSE as well as practical programming experience for solving assignments.
Students should at least have followed one previous course offered by the Machine Learning Institute (e.g., CIL or LIS) or an equivalent course offered by another institution.
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