Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2017

Materials Science Bachelor Information
2. Semester
Basis Courses Part 1
First Year Examinations
Examination Block A
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-0262-GULAnalysis II Information O8 credits5V + 4UA. Steiger
AbstractDifferential and integral calculus for functions of one and several variables; vector analysis; ordinary differential equations of first and of higher order, systems of ordinary differential equations; power series.
For each of these topics many examples from mechanics, physics and other areas.
ObjectiveIntroduction to the mathematical foundations of engineering sciences, as far as concerning differential and integral calculus.
ContentDifferential- und Integralrechnung von Funktionen einer und mehrerer Variablen; Vektoranalysis; gewöhnliche Differentialgleichungen erster und höherer Ordnung, Differentialgleichungssysteme; Potenzreihen. In jedem Teilbereich eine grosse Anzahl von Anwendungsbeispielen aus Mechanik, Physik und anderen Lehrgebieten des Ingenieurstudiums.
Lecture notesU. Stammbach: Analysis I/II
LiteratureU. Stammbach: Analysis I/II
Prerequisites / NoticeDie Übungsaufgaben (inkl. Multiple Choice) sind ein wichtiger Bestandteil der Lehrveranstaltung. Es wird erwartet, dass Sie mindestens 75% der wöchentlichen Serien bearbeiten und zur Korrektur einreichen.
Examination Block B
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-3002-00LChemistry IIO5 credits2V + 2UW. Uhlig, P. J. Walde, W. R. Caseri
AbstractGeneral Chemistry II: Chemical bonding, Introduction to organic chemistry, Overview on important classes of inorganic compounds
ObjectiveGeneral base for understanding principles of organic chemistry (structure and reaktivity).
Content1. Chemical Bonding
2. Alkanes, alkenes, alkines
3. Arenes
4. Halogenalkanes
5. Aldehydes and ketones
6. Carboxylic acids
7. Amines
8. Natural products
9. Overview on important classes of inorganic compounds
LiteratureC.E. Mortimer & U. Müller, CHEMIE, 12. Auflage, Thieme: Stuttgart, 2015 (ISBN -978-3-13-484312-5)
402-0040-00LPhysics IO5 credits4V + 2UY. M. Acremann, D. Pescia
AbstractPart A:
Introduction to mechanics, wave phenomena, Kelpler problem, rotational motion.
Part B: electrostatics of metals and isolators, magnetostatics, Maxwell equations.
ObjectiveFundamentals of mechanics, oscillations, waves, electrostatics and magnetostatics.
ContentPart A:
Introduction to mechanics, wave phenomena, Kelpler problem, rotational motion.
Part B: electrostatics of metals and isolators, magnetostatics, Maxwell equations.
Lecture notesA copy of the blackboard is made available online.
Literature(Fakultativ):
Teil A: W. Nolting, "Klassische Mechanik", Springer Verlag, Berlin, 2011.
Teil B: W. Nolting, "Elektrodynamik", Springer Verlag, Berlin, 2011
Examination Block C
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
327-0206-00LMechanicsO5 credits5GT. A. Tervoort
AbstractMechanics of materials: stress and strain, linear elastic deformations, bending, torsion, buckling, plasticity, time-dependent behavior of materials and fracture mechanics. Overview of the mechanical properties of the most important material classes: metals, ceramics and polymers.
ObjectiveThis lecture is an introduction into the mechanical behavior of structures and materials. We will discuss both the continuum description of stress and strain, and the atomistic and molecular mechanisms that determine the required material parameters.
ContentMechanics of materials: stress and strain, linear elastic deformations, bending, torsion, buckling, plasticity, time-dependent behavior of materials and fracture mechanics. Overview of the mechanical properties of the most important material classes: metals, ceramics and polymers.
Lecture noteshttp://www.softmat.mat.ethz.ch/education/courses/mechanik.html
Additional Basic Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
327-0210-00LResearch Lab Restricted registration - show details O2 credits2PS. Morgenthaler Kobas
AbstractStudents are introduced into different research areas of the department by accompanying doctoral students.
ObjectiveThe students are introduced into current research topics of D-MATL and discuss with doctoral students the scientific practice.
ContentEach student gets to know three doctoral students and their research projects during the semester. At the end of the semester the students present one research project in a short oral presentation in front of their peers.

The groups are assigned by the student office of the department.
327-0211-00LPractical Laboratory Course II Information Restricted registration - show details O5 credits4PM. B. Willeke, M. R. Dusseiller, S. Morgenthaler Kobas, P. J. Walde
AbstractPractical introduction into concepts and basic principles of Materials Science and Chemistry. To become acquainted with important chemical and physical methods.
ObjectivePractical introduction into concepts and basic principles of Materials Science and Chemistry. To become acquainted with important chemical and physical methods.
ContentExperiments in the fields e.g. of synthetic and analytical chemistry (DC, IR- and UV-spec., DSC, DLS), fracture mechanics, mechanical/thermal properties, particle tracking (DLS and classical microscopy), surface techniques (reflection spectroscopy), thermodynamics, corrosion, hardness of metals, electroplating, one computer theory experiment (simulation of molecular vibrations, VASP), "forging, stone and wood processing", "mechanical workshop" (incl. technical drawing) and further.
Lecture notesNotes with information for each experiment (aim of the experiment, theory, experimental procedure, data analysis) can be downloaded from the web (report center: https://praktikum.mat.ethz.ch or http://www.mat.ethz.ch/education/bachelor_degree/lab_courses).
Prerequisites / NoticeOrganisation: Arbeiten in 2er bzw. 4er Gruppen (Werkstoffteil) und alleine im Chemieteil.
4. Semester
Basic Courses Part 2
Examination Block 3
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
327-0401-00LMaterials Science IIO3 credits3GA. D. Schlüter, J. Kübler
AbstractPhysical properties and fracture mechanics of brittle materials.
Introduction to polymers.
ObjectiveThe composition and microstructures of the most important ceramic materials are introduced. Microstructures and heterogenous phase equilibria and the properties of the four most important structural ceramics and glass are given. An introduction to fracture mechanics of brittle materials will allow to predict the survival probabilities and life time of components under static and dynamic load.

To achieve a basic understanding for what polymers are like, how one can make them accessible and characterize them and, finally, which properties result from their chemical structure.
ContentThe basics of the chemical bonds of ceramics and glass will be presented. Heterogenous phase equilibria and the properties of the four most important structural ceramics are given. An introduction to fracture mechanics of brittle materials will allow to predict the survival probabilities and life time of components under static and dynamic load.

This introductory course discusses definitions, introduces types of polyreactions, and compares chain and step-growth polymerizations. It also treats the constitution of homo- and copolymers and networks as well as the configuration and conformation of polymers. Topics of interest are contour length, coil formation, the mobility in polymers, glass temperature, rubber elasticity, molecular weight distribution, energetics of polyreactions, and examples for polyreactions (polyadditions, polycondensations, polymerizations). Selected polymerization mechanisms and procedures are discussed. Some methods of molecular weight determination are introduced.
Lecture notesFor ceramics see: http://www.complex.mat.ethz.ch/education/lectures.html
Literature- Physical Ceramics; Y.-M. Chiang, D. Birnie, D. Kingery, Wiley, 1997.
- Neue keramische Werkstoffe; L. Michalowski (Hrsg.), Deutscher Verlag für Grundstoffindustrie, Leipzig und Stuttgart, 1994.
- Modern Ceramic Engineering; David Richerson, Ed. 2, Dekker, 1992.
- Introduction to Ceramics; W.D.Kingery, H.K.Bowen, D.K.Uhlmann, Ed. 2, Wiley, 1976.

L. Mandelkern „An Introduction to Macromolecules“, Springer 1972 (ISBN 0-387-90045-4)

J. M. G. Cowie “Polymers: Chemistry and Physics of Modern Materials”, Int. Textbook Comp. Ltd. Aylesbury (ISBN 0.7002 0222 6)

Both literatures will be made available in the course upon request.
Prerequisites / NoticeIn the first part of the lecture the bases are obtained for structural ceramics.

The second part of this lecture gives an introduction to polymers, their composition and properties.
327-0403-00LChemistry IVO4 credits3GP. J. Walde, W. R. Caseri
AbstractDeepening of knowledge in inorganic and organic chemistry
ObjectiveDeepening of knowledge in inorganic and oragnic chemistry
ContentNomenclature, stereochemistry, covalent bonds, ionic bonds, coordination bonds, hydrogen bonds, the most relevant reactions and reaction mechanisms
Lecture noteswill be distributed during the course
Examination Block 4
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
401-0654-00LNumerical Methods Information O4 credits2V + 1UR. Käppeli
AbstractThe course introduces numerical methods according to the type of problem they tackle. The tutorials will include both theoretical exercises and practical tasks.
ObjectiveThis course intends to introduce students to fundamental numerical methods that form the foundation of numerical simulation in engineering. Students are to understand the principles of numerical methods, and will be taught how to assess, implement, and apply them. The focus of this class is on the numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. During the course they will become familiar with basic techniques and concepts of numerical analysis. They should be enabled to select and adapt suitable numerical methods for a particular problem.
ContentQuadrature, Newton method, initial value problems for ordinary differential equations: explicit one step methods, step length control, stability analysis and implicit methods, structure preserving methods
LiteratureM. Hanke Bourgeois: Grundlagen der Numerischen Mathematik und des Wissenschaftlichen Rechnens, BG Teubner, Stuttgart, 2002.

W. Dahmen, A. Reusken: Numerik für Ingenieure und Naturwissenschaftler, Springer, 2008.

Extensive study of the literature is not necessary for the understanding of the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite is familiarity with basic calculus and linear algebra.
401-0164-00LMultilinear Algebra and Its ApplicationsO3 credits2V + 1UA. Iozzi
AbstractReview of the basic concepts of linear algebra, including vector spaces, linear and multilinear maps. Introduction to tensors and multilinear algebra.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to introduce the student to tensors, multilinear algebra and its applications.
ContentReview of linear algebra with emphasis on vector spaces
and linear and multilinear transformations.
Tensors of first and second order
Higher order tensors.
Multilinear maps and tensor products of vector spaces
Applications of tensors.
327-0406-00LBasic Principles of Materials Physics Information O5 credits2V + 3UA. Gusev
AbstractFoundations and applications of equilibrium thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, supplemented by an elementary theory of transport phenomena
ObjectiveThe course provides a solid working knowledge in thermodynamics (as the appropriate language for treating a variety of problems in materials science) and in statistical mechanics (as a systematic tool to find thermodynamic potentials for specific problems)
ContentThermodynamics, Statistical Mechanics
1. Introduction
2. Foundations of Thermodynamics
3. Applications of Thermodynamics
4. Foundations of Classical Statistical Mechanics
5. Applications of Classical Statistical Mechanics
6. Elementary Theory of Transport Phenomena
Lecture notesEin Leitfaden und ein zusammenfassender Artikel werden auf der oben angegebenen Website zur Lehrveranstaltung zur Verfügung gestellt
Literature1. K. Huang, Introduction to Statistical Physics (CRC Press, New York, 2010)
2. R. Kjellander, Thermodynamics Kept Simple: A Molecular Approach (CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL, 2016)
3. K. Huang, Statistical Physics (2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons, 1987)
4. D. Chandler, Introduction to Modern Statistical Mechanics (Oxford University Press, New York, 1987)
Additional Basic Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
327-0410-00LProjects in Statistical Thermodynamics Restricted registration - show details O2 credits2SJ. Vermant, P. Derlet
AbstractIndependent study of selected topics in statistical thermodynamics (small projects with presentations)
Objective(1) Supplement to and illustration of the course "Foundations of Materials Physics A"
(2) Deeper understanding by independent study of selected topics in statistical thermodynamics (small projects with presentations)
Content1. Thermal Engines.
2. Boltzmann- life and work.
3. Phase Diagrams of Multicomponent Systems.
4. How does a fuel cell work?
5. Magnetic Systems: the Ising Model.
6. The Gibbs-Thomson effect or "how difficult it is to be small".
7. Diffusion in fluids and soft solids: Fluctuations and motion.
8. Elastic response of soft solids: Entropic vs energetic elasticity.
9. The ant in the labyrinth: A first approach to diffusion and transport in disordered media.
10. Up or down? Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics illustrated for two-state systems.
11. Real solids: Thermodynamics in equilibrium.
12. Batteries: Kinetics and irreversible thermodynamics.
327-0411-00LPractical Laboratory Course IV Information Restricted registration - show details O3 credits4PM. B. Willeke, P. J. Walde
AbstractTo impart basic and advanced knowledge and experimental competence using selected examples from chemistry, physics and metal physics.
ObjectiveTo impart basic knowledge and experimental competence using selected examples from chemistry, physics and metal physics.
First acquisition of independent scientific-technical skills.
Presenting a poster about the topic of one of the experiments.
ContentChemistry IV: 1. Chemical synthesis of a dipeptide; 2. Experiments related to the "ligand field theory" (in cooperation with the Chemistry IV lecture).


Physics II: Three experiments: two in the field of nonlinear optics and one computer experiment in the field of mesoscopic systems (incl. a visit of the PSI in Villingen)

Metal physics I: Metallography/light microscophy; mechanical characterization
Lecture notesNotes with information for each experiment (aim of the experiment, theory, experimental procedure, data analysis) can be downloaded from the report center (https://praktikum.mat.ethz.ch, see also Link).
Prerequisites / NoticeErfolgreiche Teilnahme an den Praktika I - III des D-MATL. Über allfällige Ausnahmen entscheidet der Praktikumsleiter auf Anfrage.
6. Semester
Basic Courses Part 3
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
327-0506-01LMaterials Physics IIO3 credits2V + 1UP. Gambardella
AbstractThis course provides physical foundations to understand the response of different classes of materials to electromagnetic fields, focusing on the dielectric, optical, and magnetic properties of materials, and on the basic functioning of devices that exploit such properties, including photodiodes, photovoltaic cells, LEDs, laser diodes, permanent magnet motors, transformers, and magnetic memories.
ObjectiveThis course aims at giving a deepened understanding of physical phenomena relevant to Materials Science.
ContentPART I: Introduction to the dielectric properties of matter
Microscopic origin of dipoles in matter: Electronic, ionic, molecular polarization. Electric field inside and outside dielectric materials. Connection between macroscopic and microscopic polarization. Dielectric breakdown.

PART II: Interaction of electromagnetic waves with matter
The EM spectrum. Electromagnetic waves in vacuum; Energy, momentum, and angular momentum of EM waves; Sources of EM radiation; EM waves in matter. The refractive index. Transmission, Reflection, and Refraction from a microscopic point of view. Optical anisotropy, Optical activity, Dichroism.
Optical Materials: Crystalline Insulators and Semiconductors, Glasses, Metals
Photonic devices: Photodiodes, Photovoltaic cells, LEDs, Laser diodes

PART III: Magnetism
Magnetostatics: Classical concepts. Microscopic origin of magnetism. Diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism. Magnetic materials and applications.

PART IV: Superconductivity
Phenomenology of Type I and II superconductors, Meissner effect, thermodynamic properties, applications.
Lecture notesLectures and script will be in English.
Lecture notes can be downloaded at
http://www.intermag.mat.ethz.ch/education.html
LiteratureElectromagnetism and dielectric properties: E.M. Purcell and D.J. Morin, Electricity and Magnetism (Cambridge U. Press, 2013)
Optics and optical materials: E. Hecht, Optics (Lehmanns) ; M. Fox, Optical Properties of Solids (Oxford U. Press)
Photonic Devices: Simon Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices (Wiley)
Magnetism: J.M.D. Coey, Magnetism and magnetic materials (Cambridge U. Press, 2010).
General: C. Kittel, Introduction to Solid State Physics (Wiley, 2005), also available in German.
Prerequisites / NoticeGrundlagen der Materialphysik B
327-0603-00LCeramics IIO3 credits2V + 1UA. R. Studart, K. Conder
AbstractUnderstanding of the electrical, dielectric and optical properties of functional ceramics for materials engineers, physicists and electrical engineers. An introduction is given to modern ceramics materials with multiple functions.
ObjectiveCeramics II covers the basic principles of functional ceramics such as linear and non-linear dielectrics, semiconductors, ionic and mixed ionic-electronic conductors as well as materials aspects of high temperature superconductors. Examples of applications cover the range from piezo-, pyro and opto-electronic materials over sensors and solid oxide fuel cells to squids and fault current limiters with superconducting compounds.
At the end of the course, the students should be able to select the chemistry, design the microstructure and devise processing routes to fabricate functional ceramics for electronic, electromechanical, optical and magnetic applications.
Content- Applications of functional ceramics
- Dieletrics fundamentals & insulators
- Capacitors & resonators
- Ferroelectricity & piezoelectricity
- Pyroelectricity and electro-optic ceramics
- Defect chemistry
- Conductors
- Impedance spectroscopy
- Magnetic ceramics
- Superconductors
Lecture notessee:
https://www.complex.mat.ethz.ch/education/courses/ceramics2
LiteratureElectroceramics; J.A.Moulson
Free download of the book in ETH domain is possible following the link:
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/booktoc/104557643

Principles of Electronic Ceramics; L.L.Hench, J.K.West
327-0606-00LPolymers IIO3 credits2V + 1UT.‑B. Schweizer, T. A. Tervoort
AbstractPrinciples of polymer technology
ObjectiveTo obtain an understanding of the engineering aspects of structure and properties of solid polymers. Influence of polymer processing on properties of solid polymers.
Content1. Crystallization of semi-crystalline polymers
2. Glass transition of amorphous polymers
3. Mechanical properties of solid polymers
4. Examples of polymer processing
5. Laboratory exercises
Lecture noteshttp://www.polytech.mat.ethz.ch/education/courses/PolymereII
LiteratureW. Kaiser, Kunststoffchemie für Ingenieure (Hanser, München, 2005)
327-0612-00LMetals IIO3 credits2V + 1UR. Spolenak, M. Diener, A. Wahlen
AbstractIntroduction to materials selection. Basic knowledge of major metallic materials: aluminium, magnesium, titanium, copper, iron and steel. Selected topics in high temperature materials: nickel and iron-base superalloys, intermetallics and refractory metals.
ObjectiveIntroduction to materials selection. Basic knowledge of major metallic materials: aluminium, magnesium, titanium, copper, iron and steel. Selected topics in high temperature materials: nickel and iron-base superalloys, intermetallics and refractory metals.
ContentThis course is devided into five parts:

A. Materials selection
Principles of materials properties maps
Introduction to the 'Materials selector' software package
Case studies

B. Light metals and alloys
Aluminium, magnesium, titanium
Properties and hardening mechanisms
Case studies in technological applications

C. Copper and its alloys

D. Iron and steel
The seven pros for steel
Fine grained steels, heat resistant steels
Steel and corrosion phenomena
Selection and application

E. High temperature alloys
Superalloys: iron, nickel, cobalt
Intermetallics: properties and application
Lecture notesPlease visit the Moodle-link for this lecture
LiteratureGottstein, Physikalische Grundlagen der Materialkunde, Springer Verlag
Ashby/Jones, Engineering Materials 1 & 2, Pergamon Press
Ashby, Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, Pergamon Press
Porter/Easterling, Transformations in Metals and Alloys, Chapman & Hall
Bürgel, Handbuch Hochtemperatur-Werkstofftechnik, Vieweg Verlag
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Metals I
327-0610-00LAdvanced CompositesO3 credits2V + 1UF. J. Clemens, A. Winistörfer
AbstractIntroduction of basic concepts for composites with polymer- metal- and ceramic matrix composites; production and properties of composites reinforced with particles, whiskers, short and long fibres; selection criteria, case histories of applications, recycling, future perspectives, and basic concepts for adaptive and functional composites
ObjectiveGain an insight into the diversity of opportunities to change the properties of composites, learn about the most important applications and processing techniques
Content1. Introduction
1.1 What are advanced composites?
1.2 What are materials by combination?
1.3 Are composites an idea of today?
1.4 Delphi foresight
1.5 Why composites?
1.6 References for chapter 1

2. Basic modules
2.1 Particles
2.2 Short fibres including whiskers
2.3 Long fibres
2.4 Matrix materials
2.4.1 Polymers
2.4.2 Metals
2.4.3 Ceramics and glasses
2.5 References for chapter 2

3. PMC: Polymer Matrix Composites
3.1 Historical background
3.2 Types of PMC-laminates
3.3 Production, processing and machining operation
3.4 Mechanics of reinforcement, microstructure, interfaces
3.5 Failure criteria
3.6 Fatigue behaviour of a multiply composite
3.7 Adaptive materials systems
3.8 References for chapter 3

4. MMC: Metal matrix composites
4.1 Introduction: Definitions, selection criteria und "design"
4.2 Types von MMCs - examples und typical properties
4.3 Mechanical and physical properties of MMCs - basics of design, influencing variables and damage mechanisms
4.4 Production processes
4.5 Micro structure / interfaces
4.6 machining operations for MMC
4.7 Applications
4.8 References for chapter 4

5. CMC: Ceramic Matrix Composites
5.1 Introduction and historical background
5.2 Modes of reinforcement
5.3 Production processes
5.4 Mechanisms of reinforcement
5.5 Micro structure / interfaces
5.6 Properties
5.7 Applications
5.8 Materials testing and quality assurance
5.9 References for chapter 5
Lecture notesThe script will be delivered at the begin of the semester
LiteratureThe script is including a comprehensive list of references
Prerequisites / NoticeBefore each class, students will get a handout or they can be uploaded from the internet.

The exercises take place in small groups. It is their goal to deepen knowledge gained in the classes

written end of semester examination
327-0506-00LMaterials Physics II
Only for MATL BSc, programme regulations 2012

Please note that this course will be offered for the last time in spring semester 2017. Enrolment is carried out by the D-MATL study administration.
W2 credits2V + 1UP. Gambardella
AbstractThis course provides physical foundations to understand the response of different classes of materials to electromagnetic fields, focusing on the dielectric, optical, and magnetic properties of materials, and on the basic functioning of devices that exploit such properties, including photodiodes, photovoltaic cells, LEDs, laser diodes, permanent magnet motors, transformers, and magnetic memories.
ObjectiveThis course aims at giving a deepened understanding of physical phenomena relevant to Materials Science.
ContentPART I: Introduction to the dielectric properties of matter
Microscopic origin of dipoles in matter: Electronic, ionic, molecular polarization. Electric field inside and outside dielectric materials. Connection between macroscopic and microscopic polarization. Dielectric breakdown.

PART II: Interaction of electromagnetic waves with matter
The EM spectrum. Electromagnetic waves in vacuum; Energy, momentum, and angular momentum of EM waves; Sources of EM radiation; EM waves in matter. The refractive index. Transmission, Reflection, and Refraction from a microscopic point of view. Optical anisotropy, Optical activity, Dichroism.
Optical Materials: Crystalline Insulators and Semiconductors, Glasses, Metals
Photonic devices: Photodiodes, Photovoltaic cells, LEDs, Laser diodes

PART III: Magnetism
Magnetostatics: Classical concepts. Microscopic origin of magnetism. Diamagnetism, paramagnetism, ferromagnetism. Magnetic materials and applications.

PART IV: Superconductivity
Phenomenology of Type I and II superconductors, Meissner effect, thermodynamic properties, applications.
Lecture notesLectures and script will be in English.
Lecture notes can be downloaded at
http://www.intermag.mat.ethz.ch/education.html
LiteratureElectromagnetism and dielectric properties: E.M. Purcell and D.J. Morin, Electricity and Magnetism (Cambridge U. Press, 2013)
Optics and optical materials: E. Hecht, Optics (Lehmanns) ; M. Fox, Optical Properties of Solids (Oxford U. Press)
Photonic Devices: Simon Sze, Physics of Semiconductor Devices (Wiley)
Magnetism: J.M.D. Coey, Magnetism and magnetic materials (Cambridge U. Press, 2010).
General: C. Kittel, Introduction to Solid State Physics (Wiley, 2005), also available in German.
Prerequisites / NoticeGrundlagen der Materialphysik B
Industrial Internship or Project
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
327-0001-00LIndustrial Internship Restricted registration - show details
Only for Materials Science BSc
W10 creditsexternal organisers
Abstract12 weeks of industrial internship which is completed with a written report.
ObjectiveThe main objective of the 12-week internship is to expose bachelor's students to the industrial work environment. During this period, students have the opportunity to be involved in on-going projects at the host institution.
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