Consuelo De Moraes: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Name Prof. Dr. Consuelo De Moraes
FieldBiocommunication and Ecology
Address
Professur f. Biokomm. u. Ökologie
ETH Zürich, LFO G 18
Schmelzbergstrasse 9
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 39 20
E-mailconsuelo.demoraes@usys.ethz.ch
DepartmentEnvironmental Systems Science
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
551-0117-00LPlant Volatiles in Plant Insect Interactions Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
Number of participants limited to 16.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
6 credits7GC. De Moraes
AbstractDuring the course students will become familiar with methods for the collection and analysis of plant-derived volatile organic compounds and explore the role of these compounds in mediating plant-insect interactions.
ObjectiveThe course will cover six main topics that will be connected throughout the experimental phase:
1) Plant volatile biosynthesis and classification
2) Insect olfactory physiology
3) Volatile-mediated plant-herbivore interactions
4) Volatile-mediated multitrophic interactions
5) Manipulation of plant volatile emission by vector- borne disease agents
6) Methods for volatile collection and analysis
The lab practical will be performed in a system consisting of the cabbage butterfly Pieris brasicae, its host plant Brassica oleracea (Brussels sprouts), and the parasitoid wasp Cotesia glomerata (natural enemy of P. brasicae).
Students will collect volatiles from herbivore-damaged and undamaged plants and learn how to identify and quantify these compounds through gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry and flame ionization detection (GG-MS-FID). Afterwards, they will be able to compare volatile emissions from herbivore-damaged and undamaged plants and identify important volatile compounds associated with herbivory. Finally, students will evaluate the effect of herbivore-induced volatile compounds on the behavior of the herbivore (P. brassicae) and its natural enemy (C. glomerata), using different behavioral assays, inculding Y-tube olfactometers and wind tunnels.
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureThe recommended literature, including reviews and primary research articles, will be provided during the course.
751-4501-00LPhytomedicine: Entomology
Does not take place this semester.
1 credit1VC. De Moraes
AbstractApplied Entomology: key insect pests and their antagonists in crops, arthropods in storage and public health systems, insect ecology, and pest control strategies
ObjectiveAt the end of this course in Applied Entomology, students will have (1) an overview on herbivore insects (pests) and their natural antagonists in agroecosystems, combined with an insight into ongoing research, and (2) an in-depth understanding of population dynamics and damage development based on selected examples from the areas of plant, animal and public health.
751-4805-00LRecent Advances in Biocommunication
Number of participants limited to 25
3 credits2SC. De Moraes
AbstractStudents will gain insight into the role of sensory cues and signals in mediating interactions within and between species. There will be a primary, but not exclusive, focus on chemical signaling in interactions among plants, insects and microbes. The course will focus on the discussion of current literature addressing key conceptual questions and state-of-the-art research techniques and methods.
ObjectiveStudents will gain insight into the role of sensory cues and signals in mediating interactions within and between species. There will be a primary, but not exclusive, focus on chemical signaling in interactions among plants, insects and microbes. The course will focus on the discussion of current literature addressing key conceptual questions and state-of-the-art research techniques and methods. Students will engage in discussion and critical analyses of relevant papers and present their evaluations in a seminar setting.
751-5121-00LInsect Ecology2 credits2VC. De Moraes, M. Mescher, N. Stanczyk
AbstractThis is an introductory course in insect ecology. Students will learn about the ways in which insects interact with and adapt to their abiotic & biotic environments and their roles in diverse ecosystems. The course will entail lectures, outside readings, and critical analysis of contemporary literature.
ObjectiveStudents completing this course should become familiar with the application of ecological principles to the study of insects, as well as major areas of inquiry in this field. Highlighted topics will include insect behavior, chemical and sensory ecology, physiological responses to biotic and abiotic stressors, plant-insect interactions, community and food-web dynamics, and disease ecology. The course will emphasize insect evolution and adaptation in the context of specific interactions with other organisms and the abiotic environment. Examples from the literature incorporated into lectures will highlight the methods used to study insect ecology.
Lecture notesProvided to students through ILIAS
LiteratureSelected required readings (peer reviewed literature, selected book chapters). Optional recommended readings with additional information.