Michael Olsansky: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2019

Name Dr. Michael Olsansky
E-mailmichael.olsansky@milak.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.milak.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipLecturer

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
853-0063-00LMilitary History I Restricted registration - show details
Only for Public Policy BA
4 credits2V + 1UM. Olsansky
AbstractThe lecture outlines the development of the armed forces (assets regarding manpower, technology and armament), the concepts of warfare and the actual warfare in the 19th and 20th century.
Objective- Distinguish between military history as a subject and historiography as a way of describing events;
- Analyse the modern developments regarding armed forces and warfare in the context of socio-economic changes;
- Based on the approach regarding revolution in military affairs, describe the evolution of the armed forces and of warfare;
- Exemplify the issues regarding the evolution of the combat (First and Second World War, Vietnam War and Algerian War).
ContentThe lecture first examines the bases of the science of (military) history. It focuses on how military history developed from war history, on specific similarities and differences between military history and general historiography, the different ways of dealing with history in Switzerland, Germany, France and in the Anglo-Saxon cultural area (different approaches) as well as on institutions which deal with military history such as universities, military academies, national and international commissions and associations etc.

The lecture is structured along the lines of the concept of "Military Revolution" and starts with the formation of modern, European armed forces after the Oranian Army reform in the 17th century.
Based on the "Military Revolution" approach, the lecture examines the structural changes regarding the armed forces and the development of warfare from the 18th to the 20th century. Special emphasis will be put on how the battlefield was revolutionized due to the Napoleonic wars, the industrialization in the 19th century, the First World War, the mechanization and totalization during the Second World War and the period of the Cold War.
Literature- Peter Browning: The Changing Nature of Warfare, Cambridge 2002.
- MacGregor Knox/Williamson Murray: The Dynamics of Military Revolution 1300-2050, Cambridge 2001.
- Jeremy Black: Introduction to Global Military History 1775 to the present day, London 2005.
- Rolf-Dieter Müller: Militärgeschichte, Köln 2009.
853-0063-02LMilitary History I (without Exercises)3 credits2VM. Olsansky
AbstractThe purpose of the lecture is to outline the development of the armed forces (assets regarding manpower, technology and armament), the concepts of warfare and the actual warfare in the 19th and 20th century.
Objective- Distinguish between military history as a subject and historiography as a way of describing events;
- Analyse the modern developments regarding armed forces and warfare in the context of socio-economic changes;
- Based on the approach regarding revolution in military affairs, describe the evolution of the armed forces and of warfare;
- Exemplify the issues regarding the evolution of the combat (First and Second World War, Vietnam War and Algerian War).
ContentThe lecture first examines the bases of the science of (military) history. It focuses on how military history developed from war history, on specific similarities and differences between military history and general historiography, the different ways of dealing with history in Switzerland, Germany, France and in the Anglo-Saxon cultural area (different approaches) as well as on institutions which deal with military history such as universities, military academies, national and international commissions and associations etc.

The lecture is structured along the lines of the concept of "Military Revolution" and starts with the formation of modern, European armed forces after the Oranian Army reform in the 17th century.
Based on the "Military Revolution" approach, the lecture examines the structural changes regarding the armed forces and the development of warfare from the 18th to the 20th century. Special emphasis will be put on how the battlefield was revolutionized due to the Napoleonic wars, the industrialization in the 19th century, the First World War, the mechanization and totalization during the Second World War and the period of the Cold War.
Literature- Peter Browning: The Changing Nature of Warfare, Cambridge 2002.
- MacGregor Knox/Williamson Murray: The Dynamics of Military Revolution 1300-2050, Cambridge 2001.
- Jeremy Black: Introduction to Global Military History 1775 to the present day, London 2005.
- Rolf-Dieter Müller: Militärgeschichte, Köln 2009.
853-0321-00LAdvanced Course II (Seminar) Restricted registration - show details
Only for Public Policy BA
4 credits3SE. Nussio, M. Olsansky
AbstractThis two-semester course is divided into several groups. A core question relating to the topic of the seminar paper is being developed (I), which will be chosen in coordination and under the guidance of the respective lecturers. Upon conclusion, the paper will be presented in class (II). Based on the qualifications obtained in the “Proseminar”, a high academic standard is expected.
ObjectiveBased on the research design prepared in part I of the seminar, candidates write a comprehensive academic term paper. The term paper should be considered as a good preparation for the BA thesis.
ContentSeminar II builds on the findings of seminar I. Within the broader framework of the overall theme of the seminar (Foreign Policies and Security Strategies of the Great Powers) and based on the approved research design of seminar I, participants write their term paper (in close consultation with the lecturer).
Lecture notesA Reader was provided as part of seminar I (cf. online platform Moodle).
Literaturecf. Reader and Reading List Seminar I
Prerequisites / NoticeGerman