Michael Hagner: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2019

Name Prof. Dr. Michael Hagner
FieldScience Studies
Address
Professur für Wissenschaftsforsch.
ETH Zürich, RZ G 6
Clausiusstrasse 59
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 40 50
Fax+41 44 632 15 61
E-mailmhagner@ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
851-0101-66LThe History of the Book3 credits2SM. Hagner
AbstractBook print belongs to the most successful inventions in the history of mankind - it was especially important for the advancement of the sciences. Since 50 years, however, there is an ongoing talk about the end of book culture, and yet, in the 21st century the book proves to be remarkably robust. What is the reason for that?
ObjectiveIn this seminar, we will discuss selected episodes of the history of the book from Gutenberg to the present and analyse their relevance for our culture.
ContentBook print belongs to the most successful inventions in the history of mankind - it was especially important for the advancement of the sciences. Since 50 years, however, there is an ongoing talk about the end of book culture. In this seminar, we will discuss selected episodes of the history of the book from Gutenberg to the present and analyse their relevance for our culture.
851-0157-00LMind and Brain3 credits2VM. Hagner
AbstractIn the last 2500 years, the mind-brain relationship has been articulated in various ways. In these lectures, I will explore the scientific and philosophical aspects of this relationship in the context of relevant cultural, historical and technological processes, with a focus on the modern neurosciences, but I will also discuss works of art and literature.
ObjectiveBy the end of this lecture, students should be familiar with essential positions in the scientific and philosophical treatment of questions relating the mind to the brain. It should also become clear that some of the most relevant problems in current neurosciences have a long history.
ContentAccording to a myth, the ancient Greek philosopher Democrit dissected animals, because he was in search of the seat of the soul. Current neuoscientists use neuroimaging techniques like functional magnetic-resonance-tomography in order to localize cognitive and emotional qualities in the brain. Between these two dates lies a history of 2500 years, in which the relationship between the mind and the brain has been defined in various ways. Starting with ancient and medieval theories, the lecture will have its focus on modern theories from the nineteenth century onward. I will discuss essential issues in the history of the neurosciences such as localization theories, the neuron doctrine, reflex theory, theories of emotions, neurocybernetics and the importance of visualizing the brain and its parts, but I will also include works of art and literature.
862-0088-05LResearch Colloquium Science Studies (HS 2019) Restricted registration - show details 2 credits1KM. Hagner
AbstractThis colloquium is devoted to the introduction into the theory and practice of scientific work. The schedule can be found on the institute's website - http://www.wiss.ethz.ch/en/teaching/
ObjectiveThis colloquium is devoted to the introduction into the theory and practice of scientific work.
Prerequisites / NoticeLectures mey be held either in English or German. Students receive 2 credit points for submitting a brief, written commentary on one of the presented topics (approx. 5 pages).