Rachael Garrett: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2021

Name Dr. Rachael Garrett
URLhttps://epl.ethz.ch/
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipAssistant Professor (Tenure Track)

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
701-0658-00LSeminar for Bachelor Students: Human Environment Systems3 credits2SA. Müller, D. N. Bresch, R. Garrett, M. Siegrist
AbstractAnalysis and presentation of research papers from the involved chairs, relating to topics from human-environment systems.
ObjectiveThe students learn to read, understand, summarize and present current research papers related to human-environment systems. Furthermore, students train the critical discussion of these papers. The students alse get to know a number of innovative approaches for such presentations.
ContentResearch in human-environment systems is characterised by a broad range of topics and methods. This is illustrated by the research papers that are discussed in this seminar. Students choose a paper from a list and present it to the seminar participants. Furthermore, they lead the discussion and train questions and answers related to such presentations. In the first three lessons, inputs to presentation techniques and innovative approaches to presentations are provided and discussed.
Lecture notesWill be provided in the seminar.
LiteratureWill be provided in the seminar.
Prerequisites / Noticenone
701-1565-00LQuantitative Policy Analysis and Modeling6 credits4GA. Patt, R. Garrett, B. Pickering, T. Tröndle
AbstractThe lectures will introduce students to the principles of quantitative policy analysis, namely the methods to predict and evaluate the social, economic, and environmental effects of alternative strategies to achieve public objectives. A series of individual assignments, and one group project, will give students an opportunity for students to apply those methods to a set of case studies
ObjectiveThe objectives of this course are to develop the following key skills necessary for policy analysts:
- Identifying the critical quantitative factors that are of importance to policy makers in a range of decision-making situations.
- Developing conceptual models of the types of processes and relationships governing these quantitative factors, including stock-flow dynamics, feedback loops, optimization, sources and effects of uncertainty, and agent coordination problems.
- Develop and program numerical models to simulate the processes and relationships, in order to identify policy problems and the effects of policy interventions.
- Communicate the findings from these simulations and associated analysis in a manner that makes transparent their theoretical foundation, the level and sources of uncertainty, and ultimately their applicability to the policy problem.
The course will proceed through a series of policy analysis and modeling exercises, involving real-world or hypothetical problems. The specific examples around which work will be done will concern the environment, energy, health, and natural hazards management.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesfostered
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
876-0201-00LTechnology and Policy Analysis Restricted registration - show details
Only for CAS in Technology and Public Policy: Impact Analysis
8 credits5GT. Schmidt, E. Ash, R. Garrett, I. Günther, L. Kaack, A. Rom, B. Steffen
AbstractTechnologies substantially affect the way we live and how our societies function. Technological change, i.e. the innovation and diffusion of new technologies, is a fundamental driver of economic growth but can also have detrimental side effects. This module introduces methods to assess technology-related policy alternatives and to analyse how policies affect technological changes and society.
ObjectiveIntroduction:
Participants understand (1) what ex ante and ex post policy impact analysis is, (2) in what forms and with what methods they can be undertaken, (3) why they are important for evidence-​based policy-​making.
Analysis of Policy and Technology Options:
Participants understand (1) how to perform policy analyses related to technology; (2) a policy problem and the rationale for policy intervention; (3) how to select appropriate impact categories and methods to address a policy problem through policy analysis; (4) how to assess policy alternatives, using various ex ante policy analysis methods; (5) and how to communicate the results of the analysis.
Evaluation of Policy Outcomes:
Participants understand (1) when and why policy outcomes can be evaluated based on observational or experimental methods, (2) basic methods for evaluating policy outcomes (e.g. causal inference methods and field experiments), (3) how to apply concepts and methods of policy outcome evaluation to specific cases of interest.
Big Data Approaches to Policy Analysis:
Participants understand (1) why "big data" techniques for making policy-​relevant assessments and predictions are useful, and under what conditions, (2) key techniques in this area, such as procuring big datasets; pre-​processing and dimension reduction of massive datasets for tractable computation; machine learning for predicting outcomes; interpreting machine learning model predictions to understand what is going on inside the black box; data visualization including interactive web apps.
LiteratureCourse materials can be found on Moodle.