Morgan Trassin: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2023

Name Prof. Dr. Morgan Trassin
Address
Multifunktionale Ferroische Mat.
ETH Zürich, HCI E 482.1
Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1-5/10
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 633 77 78
Fax+41 44 633 11 54
E-mailmorgan.trassin@mat.ethz.ch
DepartmentMaterials
RelationshipAdjunct Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
327-0413-00LMaterials Characterization II4 credits4GR. Erni, S. Gerstl, A. Hrabec, S. S. Lee, V. Scagnoli, M. Trassin, T. Weber, P. Zeng
AbstractThe main aim of the course is to enable the students to independently choose a suitable material characterization methods to address a specific materials science question. Subject areas are: light microscopy, diffraction methods (X-rays, neutrons, electrons), electron microscopy, atom probe tomography and atomic force microscopy. Depending on lecturer, lectures and practicals in German or English.
Objective- Being able to explain the fundamentals of basic and advanced materials characterization methods based on microscopy and diffraction modalities.

- Being able to identify and solve practical problems of selected characterization methods based on corresponding laboratory work.

- Being able to advice non-experts why, how and when these methods can be used to assess what type of information, and to draw awareness to possible problems and limitations of these methods.
ContentIn the first part of the semester, different lecturers will present the fundamentals of the materials characterization methods mentioned above. This is the lecture part of the course. In the second half of the semester, the students, grouped in teams, will apply selected methods. These laboratory works are at the heart of the course, where the students are faced with practical problems and the limitations of the different methods, and where they have to independently elaborate solutions within the teams. Special: some practical courses are offered at the Paul Scherrer Institute, where the students can make use of the neutron and synchrotron X-ray facilities. These courses will take place after the end of the semester and occupy half and full days.
Lecture notes- Slides of the lectures (in English) will be distributed electronically.
- Depending on the laboratory course, additional documentation will be made available.
- In laboratory journals, the students are asked to compose their own documentation of the laboratory courses.
Literature- B. Fultz, J. Howe, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Diffractometry of Materials, 2nd ed., Springer, 2009.
- P. Willmott, An Introduction to Synchrotron Radiation: Techniques and Applications, Wiley, 2011.
Prerequisites / NoticeMaterials Characterization I
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesfostered
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
327-0622-00LMaterials Selection8 credits6GA. R. Studart, H. Galinski, R. Nicolosi Libanori, R. Spolenak, R. Style, M. Trassin
AbstractThe aim of this course is to understand the principles of material design and selection, and apply them in a number of relevant case studies related to energy, health, information technology, etc. Examples will include all materials classes. It discusses the design challenges that arise when a combination of properties and geometries are required for a specific application.
ObjectiveIn this course you will be able to:

1) Select and design materials for specific applications considering material availability, cost, properties, processability, sustainability, etc

2) Driven by a real-world challenge, develop guidelines for the selection and design of materials to manufacture devices taking into account processing-structure-property relationships
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
327-0623-00LMaterials Processing7 credits2V + 4PT. A. Tervoort, J. F. Löffler, T.‑B. Schweizer, A. R. Studart, M. Trassin
AbstractBasic concepts of materials processing of metals, ceramics and polymers.
ObjectiveThe students are able to,
- explain (or describe) overarching, i.e. valid for all classes of materials, principles of processing materials.
- develop and analyse special material-specific characteristics of the processing of metals, ceramics and polymers in the form of classroom sessions, case studies and laboratory experiments.
- to point out and assess similarities and differences between the various classes of materials on the way from raw material to end product.
ContentAfter an introduction to the application of transport phenomena to general aspects of materials processing, this lecture will discuss the main processing methods for polymers, metals and ceramics. In addition, the first principles of thin film processing are presented. In the accompanying laboratory exercises, some important processing techniques are demonstrated, such as injection moulding of polymers, extrusion of polymers and metals, deep drawing of polymers and metals, pressing and milling and sintering of ceramics, 3D printing of ceramic slips and thin film processes.
327-2226-00LEthics and Scientific Integrity for Doctoral Students (MaP Doctoral School) Restricted registration - show details
Priority is given to doctoral students affiliated with the MaP Doctoral School.
1 credit2UM. Trassin, K. M. Berg, A. Lauria, S. Stepanow
AbstractThis course sensitises doctoral students to ethical issues that may occur during their doctorate. After an introduction to ethics and good scientific practice, students are familiarised with resources that can assist them with ethical decision-making. Students get the chance to apply their knowledge in a discipline specific context.
ObjectiveDoctoral students learn how to identify, analyse and address ethical issues in their own scientific research. In addition, they will reflect on their professional role as scientific researchers.