Ulrik Brandes: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Name Prof. Dr. Ulrik Brandes
Name variantsUlrik Brandes
FieldSocial Networks
Address
Professur für Soziale Netzwerke
ETH Zürich, WEP J 14
Weinbergstr.109
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 21 96
E-mailubrandes@ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
851-0252-04LBehavioral Studies Colloquium Information 0 credits2KU. Brandes, V. Amati, H.‑D. Daniel, D. Helbing, C. Hölscher, M. Kapur, R. Schubert, C. Stadtfeld, E. Stern
AbstractThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their research ideas in relation to behavioral science. The colloquium also features invited research talks.
ObjectiveStudents know and can apply autonomously up-to-date investigation methods and techniques in the behavioral sciences. They achieve the ability to develop their own ideas in the field and to communicate their ideas in oral presentations and in written papers. The credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages.
ContentThis colloquium offers an opportunity for students to discuss their ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It also offers an opportunity for students from other disciplines to discuss their ideas in so far as they have some relation to behavioral science. The possible research areas are wide and may include theoretical as well as empirical approaches in Social Psychology and Research on Higher Education, Sociology, Modeling and Simulation in Sociology, Decision Theory and Behavioral Game Theory, Economics, Research on Learning and Instruction, Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Science. Ideally the students (from Bachelor, Master, Ph.D. and Post-Doc programs) have started to start work on their thesis or on any other term paper.
Course credit can be obtained either based on a talk in the colloquium plus a written essay, or by writing an essay about a topic related to one of the other talks in the course. Students interested in giving a talk should contact the course organizers (Ziegler, Kapur) before the first session of the semester. Priority will be given to advanced / doctoral students for oral presentations. The course credits will be obtained by a written report of approximately 10 pages. The colloquium also serves as a venue for invited talks by researchers from other universities and institutions related to behavioral and social sciences.
851-0586-02LThe Spectacles of Measurement3 credits3GU. Brandes
AbstractIf you can't measure it, you can't manage it. Explorations into mathematical foundations and societal implications of measuring humans, processes, and things in an increasingly datafied world.
ObjectiveStudents have a basic understanding of what makes a property quantifiable. They know the difference between operational and representational measurement, and the consequences this has for both, the collection of data and its use in decision making and control. With a critical attitude toward datafication, contextual differences are appreciated across domains such as science and engineering, health and sports, or governance and policy making.
ContentMeasurement Theory
- representations, scales
- meaningfulness
- direct vs. indirect, conjoint measurement

Measurement Practice
- units and standards
- sensors and intruments
- items and questionnaires

Measurement Politics
- administration and control, adaptation
- digitization, e-democracy, privacy
Lecture notesSlides made available in a course moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a 2-hour/week course. The third hour is offered as a non-mandatory biweekly lab for those who would like to learn more about mathematical aspects.
Students pair up in teams to write an essay on a measurement problem they care about (such as one pertinent to their discipline or research).
851-0586-03LApplied Network Science Restricted registration - show details
Number of participant limited to 20
3 credits2SU. Brandes
AbstractWe study applications of network science methods, this time in the domain of social media.
Topics are selected for diversity in research questions and techniques
with applications such as friendship on Facebook, re-tweeting on Twitter, and multi-channel networks on YouTube .
Student teams present results from the recent literature, possibly with replication, in a mini-conference.
ObjectiveNetwork science as a paradigm is entering domains from engineering to the humantities but application is tricky.
By examples from recent research on social media, students learn to appreciate that, and how, context matters.
They will be able to assess the appropriateness of approaches
for substantive research problems, and especially when and why quantitative approaches are or are not suitable.