Janneke Hille Ris Lambers: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2021

Name Prof. Dr. Janneke Hille Ris Lambers
FieldPlant Ecology
Address
Professur für Pflanzenökologie
ETH Zürich, CHN H 64
Universitätstrasse 16
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 85 52
E-mailjanneke.hillerislambers@usys.ethz.ch
DepartmentEnvironmental Systems Science
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
061-0103-00LEcology and Plant Sciences Information Restricted registration - show details
Only for Landscape Architecture MSc.
2 credits3GT. Galí-Izard, N. Guettler, A. Guggisberg, J. Hille Ris Lambers, M. Lévesque, A. Rudow
AbstractThis course introduces ecology and plant sciences. Through lectures, exercises and excursions, students will gain a broad vision of the cutting edge topics that are being researched and studied at the Department of Environmental Systems Science at ETH. This will be the base for a future dialog between the field of landscape architecture and the field of sciences.
ObjectiveStudents acquire basic knowledge in ecology and plant sciences focusing in its application in the field of landscape architecture. Temporal and physical scale, research methods, units of measurement, lexicon, modes of representation and critical literature form the framework for the joint discourse.
ContentThe fundamental course “Ecology and Plant Sciences” is an introduction to the field of living systems, starting with the history of ecology, followed by an introduction to plant systematics, taxonomy and physiology. The course will also introduce students to the specifics of grassland systems and forests. Lastly, the course will focus on the specifics of tree structure and function.
Lecture notesCourse material will be provided.
LiteratureThe course material includes a reading list.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe fundamental course is organized with the Fundamental Studio I as a joint two-week module. The weekly schedule is provided with the course documents.

Module 4 "Ecology and Plant Sciences", 10.10.–21.10.2022

The course is held in English or German.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
701-0243-AALBiology III: Essentials of Ecology
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RJ. Hille Ris Lambers
AbstractThis course assigns reading for students needing further background for understanding ecological processes. Central problems in ecology, including population growth and regulation, the dynamics of species interactions, the influence of spatial structure, the controls over species invasions, and community responses to environmental change will be explored from basic and applied perspectives.
ObjectiveOriginal language Students will understand how ecological processes operate in natural communities. They will appreciate how mathematical theory, field experimentation, and observational studies combine to generate a predictive science of ecological processes.

Upon completing the course, students will be able to:

Understand the factors determining the outcome of species interactions in communities, and how this information informs management.

Apply theoretical knowledge on species interactions to predict the potential outcomes of novel species introductions.

Understanding the role of spatial structure in mediating population dynamics and persistence, species interactions, and patterns of species diversity.

Use population and community models to predict the stability of interactions between predators and prey and between different competitors.

Understand the conceptual basis of predictions concerning how ecological communities will respond to climate change.
ContentReadings from a text book will focus on understanding central processes in community ecology. Topics will include demographic and spatial structure, consumer resource interactions, food webs, competition, invasion, and the maintenance of species diversity. Each of these more conceptual topics will be discussed in concert with their applications to the conservation and management of species and communities in a changing world.
701-0328-00LAdvanced Ecological Processes Restricted registration - show details
For students of the following study programmes only:
Biology Master
Teaching certificate Biology
Environmental Sciences Master
UZH MNF Biology
UZH MNF Geography /Earth Sciences
4 credits2VJ. Hille Ris Lambers
AbstractThis course presents the theoretical and empirical approaches used to understand the ecological processes structuring communities. Central problems in community ecology including the dynamics of species interactions, the influence of spatial structure, the controls over species invasions, and community responses to environmental change will be explored from basic and applied perspectives.
ObjectiveStudents will understand how ecological processes operate in natural communities. They will appreciate how mathematical theory, field experimentation, and observational studies combine to generate a predictive science of ecological processes, and how this predictive science informs conservation and management decisions.

Upon completing the course, students will be able to:

Understand the factors determining the outcome of species interactions in communities, and how this information informs management.

Apply theoretical knowledge on species interactions to predict the potential outcomes of novel species introductions.

Understanding the role of spatial structure in mediating population dynamics and persistence, species interactions, and patterns of species diversity.

Use population and community models to predict the stability of interactions between predators and prey and between different competitors.

Understand the conceptual basis of predictions concerning how ecological communities will respond to climate change.

Discuss the types of conceptual advances ecology as a science can realistically achieve, and how these relate to the applications of the discipline.
ContentLectures supplemented with readings from the primary literature and occasional computer exercises will focus on understanding central processes in community ecology. Topics will include demographic and spatial structure, consumer resource interactions, food webs, competition, mutualism, invasion, the maintenance of species diversity, and species effects on ecosystem processes. Each of these more conceptual topics will be discussed in concert with their applications to the conservation and management of species and communities in a changing world.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesfostered
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
701-1460-00LEcology and Evolution: Term Paper Restricted registration - show details 5 credits11AT. Städler, J. Alexander, S. Bonhoeffer, T. Crowther, A. Hall, J. Hille Ris Lambers, J. Jokela, J. Payne, G. Velicer, A. Widmer
AbstractIndividual writing of an essay-type review paper about a specialized topic in the field of ecology and evolution, based on substantial reading of original literature and discussions with a senior scientist.
Objective- Students acquire a thorough knowledge on a topic in which they are particularly interested
- They learn to assess the relevance of original literature and synthesize information
- They make the experience of becoming "experts" on a topic and develop their own perspective
- They practise academic writing according to professional standards in English
ContentTopics for the essays are proposed by the professors and lecturers of the major in Ecology and Evolution at a joint meeting at the beginning of the semester (the date will be communicated by e-mail to registered students).
Students will:
- choose a topic
- search and read appropriate literature
- develop a personal view on the topic and structure their arguments
- prepare figures and tables to represent ideas or illustrate them with examples
- write a clear, logical and well-structured text
- refine the text and present the paper according to professional standards

In all steps, they will benefit from the advice and detailed feedback given by a senior scientist acting as personal tutor of the student.
Lecture notesReading of articles in scientific journals