Christoph Hölscher: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2021

Name Prof. Dr. Christoph Hölscher
FieldCognitive Science
Address
Chair of Cognitive Science
ETH Zürich, RZ E 23
Clausiusstrasse 59
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 31 96
E-mailchoelsch@ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
363-1162-00LResilience in the New Age of Risk3 credits2VH. Schernberg, C. Hölscher, J. Jörin, G. Sansavini
AbstractWith the global increase in interconnectivity, the potential for disruption is everywhere. Modern organisations who build resilience in all systems will respond intelligently to emergent disruptions. This course explores the concept of resilience and its application to socio-technical systems: The resilience of infrastructure systems and how individuals and social groups interact in and with them.
ObjectiveAfter taking this course, you will be able to:
- Discuss the concept of resilience and related frameworks and concepts, and explain their relevance in different contexts (organizations, infrastructure, social groups…).
- Use and discuss key resilience metrics and use them to analyze infrastructure systems.
- Discuss the role of organizational resilience and describe methods to improve it.
- Describe how resilience is applied in practice.
ContentOur increasingly complex and connected systems face continuously emerging disruptions. Resilience constitutes a fundamental departure from the philosophy of risk-management. With resilience, stakeholders adopt risk mitigation strategies aligned to the theories of complex systems.

It is, however, difficult to learn about resilience, since it applies to an extremely large array of systems and contexts. Moreover, the topic of resilience is surprisingly absent from most university curricula. This course fills a gap and walks you through a mode of thinking that is bound to shape the way risks and disasters are dealt with in our increasingly connected society. Hence, tomorrow's risk managers will and shall also be "resilience managers".

This course breaks down the concept of complex systems and their resilience. It introduces some of the different flavors of resilience and provides tools for building it in various socially relevant areas (social resilience, engineered systems resilience, organizational resilience...).

The course is divided in 4 parts.
- Part 1: Foundations of Resilience (4 hours)
- Part 2: Resilience Analysis: Infrastructure Systems (10 hours)
- Part 3: Organizational resilience and sensemaking (6 hours)
- Part 4: Resilience in Practice (4 hours)

Part 1 introduces the concept of resilience, and the framework in which it is applied. The distinction between resilience and risk management is highlighted, as well as how these approaches complement each other. The founding concepts of resilience are explained and illustrated: vulnerability, disruption, absorption, recovery, adaptation, etc.

Part 2 walks you through the analysis of the resilience of infrastructure systems. It introduces the useful metrics of resilience. It provides examples of building resilience into complex systems, by increasing the robustness and recoverability of systems, and reducing vulnerabilities. Finally, students will explore the optimization of infrastructure systems.

Part 3. Every system subject to potential disruptions is managed by a human organization. Sensemaking describes how humans frame the problem. It is a process whereby organizational actors attach meaning to external events to resolve the uncertainty surrounding them. Investing in mindfulness improves personal and organizational resilience and success. Finally, the management of organizational resilience is discussed.

Part 4 will provide examples of the use of resilience by practitioners, with guest speakers from the public and private sector.

This course is aimed at MSc and MAS students, from MTEC and other departments. Ideally, students have a quantitative background and some knowledge of risk management.
LiteratureThe Science and Practice of Resilience, Book by Benjamin D. Trump and Igor Linkov
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is hybrid (in-person or remote).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingfostered
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingfostered
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
364-1058-00LRisk Center Seminar Series0 credits2SB. J. Bergmann, D. Basin, A. Bommier, D. N. Bresch, L.‑E. Cederman, P. Cheridito, F. Corman, O. Fink, H. Gersbach, C. Hölscher, K. Paterson, H. Schernberg, F. Schweitzer, D. Sornette, B. Stojadinovic, B. Sudret, J. Teichmann, U. A. Weidmann, S. Wiemer, M. Zeilinger, R. Zenklusen
AbstractThis course is a mixture between a seminar primarily for PhD and postdoc students and a colloquium involving invited speakers. It consists of presentations and subsequent discussions in the area of modeling complex socio-economic systems and crises. Students and other guests are welcome.
ObjectiveParticipants should learn to get an overview of the state of the art in the field, to present it in a well understandable way to an interdisciplinary scientific audience, to develop novel mathematical models for open problems, to analyze them with computers, and to defend their results in response to critical questions. In essence, participants should improve their scientific skills and learn to work scientifically on an internationally competitive level.
ContentThis course is a mixture between a seminar primarily for PhD and postdoc students and a colloquium involving invited speakers. It consists of presentations and subsequent discussions in the area of modeling complex socio-economic systems and crises. For details of the program see the webpage of the colloquium. Students and other guests are welcome.
Lecture notesThere is no script, but a short protocol of the sessions will be sent to all participants who have participated in a particular session. Transparencies of the presentations may be put on the course webpage.
LiteratureLiterature will be provided by the speakers in their respective presentations.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipants should have relatively good mathematical skills and some experience of how scientific work is performed.
851-0252-01LHuman-Computer Interaction: Cognition and Usability Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 35.

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-INFK, D-ITET
3 credits2SH. Zhao, S. Credé, C. Hölscher
AbstractThis seminar introduces theory and methods in human-computer interaction and usability. Cognitive Science provides a theoretical framework for designing user interfaces as well as a range of methods for assessing usability (user testing, cognitive walkthrough, GOMS). The seminar will provide an opportunity to experience some of the methods in applied group projects.
ObjectiveThis seminar will introduce key topics, theories and methodology in human-computer interaction (HCI) and usability. Presentations will cover basics of human-computer interaction and selected topics like mobile interaction, adaptive systems, human error and attention. A focus of the seminar will be on getting to know evaluation techniques in HCI. Students form work groups that first familiarize themselves with a select usability evaluation method (e.g. user testing, GOMS, task analysis, heuristic evaluation, questionnaires or Cognitive Walkthrough). They will then apply the methods to a human-computer interaction setting (e.g. an existing software or hardware interface) and present the method as well as their procedure and results to the plenary. Active participation is vital for the success of the seminar, and students are expected to contribute to presentations of foundational themes, methods and results of their chosen group project. In order to obtain course credit a written essay / report will be required (details to be specified in the introductory session of the course).
851-0252-04LBehavioral Studies Colloquium Information 0 credits2KE. Stern, U. Brandes, D. Helbing, C. Hölscher, M. Kapur, C. Stadtfeld
AbstractThis colloquium offers an opportunity to discuss recent and ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science.
The colloquium features invited presentations from internal and external researchers as well as presentations of doctoral students close to submitting their dissertation research plan.
ObjectiveParticipants are informed about recent and ongoing research in different branches of the behavioral sciences. Presenting doctoral students obtain feedback on their dissertation research plan.
ContentThis colloquium offers an opportunity to discuss recent and ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It covers a broad range of areas, including theoretical as well as empirical research in social psychology, research on higher education, sociology, modeling and simulation in sociology, decision theory and behavioral game theory, economics, research on learning and instruction, cognitive psychology and cognitive science.

The colloquium features invited presentations from internal and external researchers as well as presentations of doctoral students close to submitting their dissertation research plan.
Prerequisites / NoticeDoctoral students in D-GESS can obtain 2 credit points for presenting their dissertation research plan.
851-0252-05LResearch Seminar Cognitive Science Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: Participants should be involved in research in the cognitive science group.
2 credits2SC. Hölscher, S. Andraszewicz
AbstractThe colloquium provides a forum for researchers and graduate students in cognitive science to present/discuss their ongoing projects as well as jointly discuss current publications in cognitive science and related fields. A subset of the sessions will include invited external visitors presenting their research. Participants of this colloquium are expected to be involved in active research group.
ObjectiveGraduate student train and improve their presentation skills based on their own project ideas, all participants stay informed on current trends in the field and have the opportunity for networking with invited scholars.
851-0252-08LEvidence-Based Design: Methods and Tools For Evaluating Architectural Design Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH
3 credits2SM. Gath Morad, C. Hölscher, L. Narvaez Zertuche, C. Veddeler
AbstractStudents are taught a variety of analytic techniques that can be used to evaluate architectural design. The concept of evidence-based design is introduced, and complemented with theoretical background on space syntax and spatial cognition. This is a project-oriented course, students implement a range of methods on a sample project. The course is tailored for architecture design students.
ObjectiveThe course aims to teach students how to evaluate a design project from the perspective of the end user. The concept of evidence-based design is introduced through a series of case studies. Students are given a theoretical background in space syntax and spatial cognition, with a view to applying this knowledge during the design process. The course covers a range of methods including visibility analysis, network analysis, conducting real-world observations, and virtual reality for architectural design. Students apply these methods to a case study of their choice, which can be at building or urban scale. For students taking a B-ARCH or M-ARCH degree, this can be a completed or ongoing design studio project. The course gives students the chance to implement the methods iteratively and explore how best to address the needs of the eventual end-user during the design process.

The course is tailored for students studying for B-ARCH and M-ARCH degrees. As an alternative to obtaining D-GESS credit, architecture students can obtain course credit in "Vertiefungsfach" or "Wahlfach".
851-0252-10LProject in Behavioural Finance Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40

Particularly suitable for students of D-MTEC
3 credits2SS. Andraszewicz, C. Hölscher, A. C. Roberts
AbstractIn this seminar, students will study cognitive processes, behaviour and the underlying biological response to financial decisions. Research methods such as asset market experiments, lottery games, risk preference assessment, psychometrics, neuroimaging and psychophysiology of decision processes will be discussed. Financial bubbles and crashes will be the core interest.
ObjectiveThis course has four main goals:
1) To learn about the most important topics within Behavioural Finance
2) To learn how to conduct behavioural studies, design experiments, plan data collection and experimental tasks
3) To learn about causes of market crashes, factors that influence them, traders' behaviour before, during and after financial crises
4) To investigate a topic of interest, related to behaviour of traders during market crashes.

Additionally, the course gives to the students the opportunity to practice oral presentations, communication skills, report writing and critical thinking.
ContentThe course provides an overview of the most important topics in Behavioural Finance. First part of the course involves reading scientific articles, which will be discussed during the seminar. Therefore, attendance is required to pass the course. Each week, a student volunteer will present a paper and the presentation will be followed by a discussion. After obtaining sufficient knowledge of the field, students will select a topic for a behavioural study of their own. The final assignment consists of preparing and conducting a small behavioural study/experiment, analysing the data and presenting the project in the final meeting of the class. Each student will write a scientific report of their study.