Christoph Hölscher: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2020

Name Prof. Dr. Christoph Hölscher
FieldCognitive Science
Address
Chair of Cognitive Science
ETH Zürich, RZ E 23
Clausiusstrasse 59
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 31 96
E-mailchoelsch@ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
851-0252-01LHuman-Computer Interaction: Cognition and Usability Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 35.

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH, D-INFK, D-ITET
3 credits2SH. Zhao, C. Hölscher, S. Ognjanovic
AbstractThis seminar introduces theory and methods in human-computer interaction and usability. Cognitive Science provides a theoretical framework for designing user interfaces as well as a range of methods for assessing usability (user testing, cognitive walkthrough, GOMS). The seminar will provide an opportunity to experience some of the methods in applied group projects.
ObjectiveThis seminar will introduce key topics, theories and methodology in human-computer interaction (HCI) and usability. Presentations will cover basics of human-computer interaction and selected topics like mobile interaction, adaptive systems, human error and attention. A focus of the seminar will be on getting to know evaluation techniques in HCI. Students form work groups that first familiarize themselves with a select usability evaluation method (e.g. user testing, GOMS, task analysis, heuristic evaluation, questionnaires or Cognitive Walkthrough). They will then apply the methods to a human-computer interaction setting (e.g. an existing software or hardware interface) and present the method as well as their procedure and results to the plenary. Active participation is vital for the success of the seminar, and students are expected to contribute to presentations of foundational themes, methods and results of their chosen group project. In order to obtain course credit a written essay / report will be required (details to be specified in the introductory session of the course).
851-0252-02LIntroduction to Cognitive Science
Does not take place this semester.
Particularly suitable for students of D-ITET
3 credits2VC. Hölscher
AbstractThe lectures provide an overview of the foundations of cognitive science and investigate processes of human cognition, especially perception, learning, memory and reasoning. This includes a comparison of cognitive processes in humans and technical systems, especially with respect to knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation and usage in information processing tasks.
ObjectiveCognitive Science views human cognition as information processing and provides an inter-disciplinary integration of approaches from cognitive psychology, informatics (e.g., artificial intelligence), neuroscience and anthropology among others. The lectures provide an overview of basic mechanisms of human information processing and various application domains. A focus will be on matters of knowledge acquisition, representation and usage in humans and machines. Models of human perception, reasoning, memory and learning are presented and students will learn about experimental methods of investigating and understanding human cognitive processes and representation structures.
851-0252-04LBehavioral Studies Colloquium Information 0 credits2KD. Helbing, U. Brandes, C. Hölscher, M. Kapur, C. Stadtfeld, E. Stern
AbstractThis colloquium is about recent and ongoing research and scientific ideas in the behavioral sciences, both at the micro- and macro-levels of cognitive, behavioral and social science. It features invited presentations from internal and external researchers as well as presentations of doctoral students close to submitting their dissertation research plan.
ObjectiveParticipants are informed about recent and ongoing research in the field. Presenting doctoral students obtain feedback on their dissertation research plan.
ContentThe covers the broadly understood field of behavioral science, including theoretical as well as empirical research in Social Psychology and Research on Higher Education, Sociology, Modeling and Simulation in Sociology, Decision Theory and Behavioral Game Theory, Economics, Research on Learning and Instruction, Cognitive Psychology and Cognitive Science.
Prerequisites / NoticeDoctoral students in D-GESS can obtain 2 credits for presenting their dissertation research plan.
851-0252-05LResearch Seminar Cognitive Science Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: Participants should be involved in research in the cognitive science group.
2 credits2SC. Hölscher, S. Andraszewicz
AbstractThe colloquium provides a forum for researchers and graduate students in cognitive science to present/discuss their ongoing projects as well as jointly discuss current publications in cognitive science and related fields. A subset of the sessions will include invited external visitors presenting their research. Participants of this colloquium are expected to be involved in active research group.
ObjectiveGraduate student train and improve their presentation skills based on their own project ideas, all participants stay informed on current trends in the field and have the opportunity for networking with invited scholars.
851-0252-08LEvidence-Based Design: Methods and Tools For Evaluating Architectural Design Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40

Particularly suitable for students of D-ARCH
3 credits2SM. Gath Morad, C. Hölscher, C. Veddeler
AbstractStudents are taught a variety of analytic techniques that can be used to evaluate architectural design. The concept of evidence-based design is introduced, and complemented with theoretical background on space syntax and spatial cognition. This is a project-oriented course, students implement a range of methods on a sample project. The course is tailored for architecture design students.
ObjectiveThe course aims to teach students how to evaluate a design project from the perspective of the end user. The concept of evidence-based design is introduced through a series of case studies. Students are given a theoretical background in space syntax and spatial cognition, with a view to applying this knowledge during the design process. The course covers a range of methods including visibility analysis, network analysis, conducting real-world observations, and virtual reality for architectural design. Students apply these methods to a case study of their choice, which can be at building or urban scale. For students taking a B-ARCH or M-ARCH degree, this can be a completed or ongoing design studio project. The course gives students the chance to implement the methods iteratively and explore how best to address the needs of the eventual end-user during the design process.

The course is tailored for students studying for B-ARCH and M-ARCH degrees. As an alternative to obtaining D-GESS credit, architecture students can obtain course credit in "Vertiefungsfach" or "Wahlfach".
851-0252-10LProject in Behavioural Finance Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 40

Particularly suitable for students of D-MTEC
3 credits2SS. Andraszewicz, C. Hölscher, D. Kaszás
AbstractIn this seminar, students will study cognitive processes, behaviour and the underlying biological response to financial decisions. Research methods such as asset market experiments, lottery games, risk preference assessment, psychometrics, neuroimaging and psychophysiology of decision processes will be discussed. Financial bubbles and crashes will be the core interest.
ObjectiveThis course has four main goals:
1) To learn about the most important topics within Behavioural Finance
2) To learn how to conduct behavioural studies, design experiments, plan data collection and experimental tasks
3) To learn about causes of market crashes, factors that influence them, traders' behaviour before, during and after financial crises
4) To investigate a topic of interest, related to behaviour of traders during market crashes.

Additionally, the course gives to the students the opportunity to practice oral presentations, communication skills, report writing and critical thinking.
ContentThe course provides an overview of the most important topics in Behavioural Finance. First part of the course involves reading scientific articles, which will be discussed during the seminar. Therefore, attendance is required to pass the course. Each week, a student volunteer will present a paper and the presentation will be followed by a discussion. After obtaining sufficient knowledge of the field, students will select a topic for a behavioural study of their own. The final assignment consists of preparing and conducting a small behavioural study/experiment, analysing the data and presenting the project in the final meeting of the class. Each student will write a scientific report of their study.
Lecture notesDear Student,

Thank you very much for you interest in the course entitled "Project in Behavioral Finance".

For a short introduction to Behavioral Finance and Behavioral Economics, I encourage you to watch this 4-minute video by a famous decision scientist Dan Airely: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wpMLYh-UIsA

In this course, you will learn the most important topics related to making decisions under risk, impact of emotions, personality and individual differences on important decisions such as investment, managerial decision making, medical decision making etc. Also, you will have the opportunity to practice giving presentations.

There is no exam nor compulsory reading in the course. You will learn based on presentations from others and interactive discussions. To successfully complete the course, in a group of 4, you have to do a project and attend the course. The projects will be based on the business cases provided by an industry partner.

This semester, the projects will be related to forecasting and improving elicitation of the expert judgment. Expert judgment is a very important topic in various businesses involving high levels of uncertainty, and little data available to generate reliable quantitative predictions.

I would like to share a few important pieces of information:

- The first class will take place on September 23rd at 4:15 pm. Please, note, that this is in the second week of the semester.

- Due to safety measures related to COVID-19 situation, the rooms will only be assigned at the beginning of the semester. You will receive another email informing you about the room.

- The first two classes, September 23rd and September 30th will take place at the ETH. The classes from October 7th will take place over ZOOM. Therefore, we will implement hybrid learning.

- The class on September 23rd is important. You will learn about the requirements and objectives of the course.

- The course will conclude with final presentations of the solutions of the project. We will decide whether this event will take place online or at the ETH. I am very sorry that this is still unclear. This is related to the current uncertain situation related to COVID-19.

I hope that you will enjoy the class. If you decide not to attend the class, please sign out of the course the latest by September 30th.

I am looking forward to meeting all of you on September 23rd.

Kind regards,

Sandra Andraszewicz
also on behalf of Daniel Kaszas and Christoph Hölscher