Vincenzo Picotti: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2019

Name Prof. Dr. Vincenzo Picotti
Address
Geologisches Institut
ETH Zürich, NO E 51.2
Sonneggstrasse 5
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 81 60
E-mailvincenzo.picotti@erdw.ethz.ch
DepartmentEarth Sciences
RelationshipAdjunct Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
651-3070-AALFundamentals of Geology
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
6 credits13RV. Picotti, W. Behr
Abstract
Objective
651-4041-00LSedimentology I: Physical Processes and Sedimentary Systems3 credits2GV. Picotti
AbstractSediments preserved a record of past landscapes. This courses focuses on understanding the processes that modify sedimentary landscapes with time and how we can read this changes in the sedimentary record.
ObjectiveThe students learn basic concepts of modern sedimentology and stratigraphy in the context of sequence stratigraphy and sea level change. They discuss the advantages and pitfalls of the method and look beyond. In particular we pay attention to introducing the importance of considering entire sediment routing systems and understanding their functionning.
ContentDetails on the program will be handed out during the first lecture.

We will attribute the papers for presentation on the 26th, so please be here on that day!
LiteratureThe sedimentary record of sea-level change
Angela Coe, the Open University.
Cambridge University Press
Prerequisites / NoticeThe grading of students is based on in-class exercises and end-semester examination.
651-4043-00LSedimentology II: Biological and Chemical Processes in Lacustrine and Marine Systems
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the MSc-course "Sedimentology I" (651-4041-00L).
3 credits2GV. Picotti, A. Gilli, I. Hernández Almeida, H. Stoll
AbstractThe course will focus on biological amd chemical aspects of sedimentation in marine environments. Marine sedimentation will be traced from coast to deep-sea. The use of stable isotopes palaeoceanography will be discussed. Neritic, hemipelagic and pelagic sediments will be used as proxies for environmental change during times of major perturbations of climate and oceanography.
Objective-You will understand chemistry and biology of the marine carbonate system
-You will be able to relate carbonate mineralogy with facies and environmental conditions
-You will be familiar with cool-water and warm-water carbonates
-You will see carbonate and organic-carbon rich sediments as part of the global carbon cycle
-You will be able to recognize links between climate and marine carbonate systems (e.g. acidification of oceans and reef growth)
-You will be able to use geological archives as source of information on global change
-You will have an overview of marine sedimentation through time
Content-carbonates,: chemistry, mineralogy, biology
-carbonate sedimentation from the shelf to the deep sea
-carbonate facies
-cool-water and warm-water carbonates
-organic-carbon and black shales
-C-cycle, carbonates, Corg : CO2 sources and sink
-Carbonates: their geochemical proxies for environmental change: stable isotopes, Mg/Ca, Sr
-marine sediments thorugh geological time
-carbonates and evaporites
-lacustrine carbonates
-economic aspects of limestone
Lecture notesno script. scientific articles will be distributed during the course
LiteratureWe will read and critically discuss scientific articles relevant for "biological and chemical processes in marine and lacustrine systems"
Prerequisites / NoticeThe grading of students is based on in-class exercises and end-semester examination.
651-4113-00LSedimentary Petrography and Microscopy2 credits2GV. Picotti, M. G. Fellin
AbstractMicroscopy of carbonate (1st half of semester) and sliciclastic rocks (2nd half) rocks as well as siliceous, phosphatic and evaporitic sediements.
ObjectiveDescription of grains and cement/matrix, texture, classification of the main sedimentary rocks. Discussion and interpretation of the environment of sedimentation. Diagenetic Processes.
ContentMicroscopy of carbonate and siliciclastic rocks, siliceous and phosphatic rocks, their origin and classification. Diagenesis.
Lecture notesEnglish textbooks recommended
LiteratureTucker, M.E. (2001): Sedimentary Petrology-An introduction to the Origin of Sedimentary Rocks, 3rd Editition. Blackwell Science Ltd., Oxford, 262 p.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe earlier attendance of other MSc microscopy courses (e.g. magmatic and metamorphic rocks) is not required if during the BSc a general course on microscopy of rocks was completed.
651-4117-00LSediment Analysis
Prerequisite: Successful completion of the MSc-course "Sedimentology I" (651-4041-00L).
3 credits2GM. G. Fellin, A. Gilli, V. Picotti
AbstractTheoretical background and application of some basic methods for sediment analysis.
ObjectiveThe main goal is to learn how to apply the analysis of the texture and grain-size of sediments to constrain the sedimentary processes and environments.
ContentA one-day fieldtrip to a local outcrop to learn how to describe sediments in the field and to collect samples for grain-size and compositional analysis. Application of the same analytical techniques on samples of unknown origin: the sampling sites will be revealed at the end of the course. Discussion of the theoretical background and of the results in class. At the end of the course, the student will have to hand in a report with the presentation and discussion of all the data produced during the course.
Lecture notesFor the various analytical methods English texts will be provided in class.
LiteratureIntroduction to clastic sedimentology. R.J. Cheel, Brock University