Adrian Perrig: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2021

Name Prof. Dr. Adrian Perrig
FieldComputer Science
Address
Institut f. Informationssicherheit
ETH Zürich, CAB F 85.1
Universitätstrasse 6
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 99 69
E-mailadrian.perrig@inf.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.netsec.ethz.ch/people/aperrig
DepartmentComputer Science
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
252-1414-00LSystem Security Information 7 credits2V + 2U + 2AS. Capkun, A. Perrig
AbstractThe first part of the lecture covers individual system aspects starting with tamperproof or tamper-resistant hardware in general over operating system related security mechanisms to application software systems, such as host based intrusion detection systems. In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for building secure systems.
ObjectiveIn this lecture, students learn about the security requirements and capabilities that are expected from modern hardware, operating systems, and other software environments. An overview of available technologies, algorithms and standards is given, with which these requirements can be met.
ContentThe first part of the lecture covers individual system's aspects starting with tamperproof or tamperresistant hardware in general over operating system related security mechanisms to application software systems such as host based intrusion detetction systems. The main topics covered are: tamper resistant hardware, CPU support for security, protection mechanisms in the kernel, file system security (permissions / ACLs / network filesystem issues), IPC Security, mechanisms in more modern OS, such as Capabilities and Zones, Libraries and Software tools for security assurance, etc.

In the second part, the focus is on system design and methodologies for building secure systems. Topics include: patch management, common software faults (buffer overflows, etc.), writing secure software (design, architecture, QA, testing), compiler-supported security, language-supported security, logging and auditing (BSM audit, dtrace, ...), cryptographic support, and trustworthy computing (TCG, SGX).

Along the lectures, model cases will be elaborated and evaluated in the exercises.
252-4601-00LCurrent Topics in Information Security Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
2 credits2SS. Capkun, K. Paterson, A. Perrig, S. Shinde
AbstractThe seminar covers various topics in information security: security protocols (models, specification & verification), trust management, access control, non-interference, side-channel attacks, identity-based cryptography, host-based attack detection, anomaly detection in backbone networks, key-management for sensor networks.
ObjectiveThe main goals of the seminar are the independent study of scientific literature and assessment of its contributions as well as learning and practicing presentation techniques.
ContentThe seminar covers various topics in information security, including network security, cryptography and security protocols. The participants are expected to read a scientific paper and present it in a 35-40 min talk. At the beginning of the semester a short introduction to presentation techniques will be given.

Selected Topics

- security protocols: models, specification & verification
- trust management, access control and non-interference
- side-channel attacks
- identity-based cryptography
- host-based attack detection
- anomaly detection in backbone networks
- key-management for sensor networks
LiteratureThe reading list will be published on the course web site.
263-0009-00LInformation Security Lab Information Restricted registration - show details
Only for master students!
Number of participants limited to 250.
8 credits2V + 1U + 3P + 1AK. Paterson, S. Capkun, D. Hofheinz, A. Perrig, S. Shinde
AbstractThis InterFocus Course will provide a broad, hands-on introduction to Information Security, introducing adversarial thinking and security by design as key approaches to building secure systems.
ObjectiveThis course will introduce key concepts from Information Security, both from attack and defence perspectives. Students will gain an appreciation of the complexity and challenge of building secure systems.
ContentThe course is organised in two-week segments. In each segment, a new concept from Information Security will be introduced. The overall scope will be broad, including cryptography, protocol design, network security, system security.
Lecture notesWill be made available during the semester.
LiteraturePaul C. van Oorschot, Computer Security and the Internet: Tools and Jewels.
Dan Boneh and Victor Shoup, A Graduate Course in Applied Cryptography.
Prerequisites / NoticeIdeally, students will have taken the D-INFK Bachelors course “Information Security" or an equivalent course at Bachelors level.
263-4640-00LNetwork Security Information 8 credits2V + 2U + 3AA. Perrig, S. Frei, M. Legner, K. Paterson
AbstractSome of today's most damaging attacks on computer systems involve exploitation of network infrastructure, either as the target of attack or as a vehicle to attack end systems.
This course provides an in-depth study of network attack techniques and methods to defend against them.
Objective- Students are familiar with fundamental network-security concepts.
- Students can assess current threats that Internet services and networked devices face, and can evaluate appropriate countermeasures.
- Students can identify and assess vulnerabilities in software systems and network protocols.
- Students have an in-depth understanding of a range of important state-of-the-art security technologies.
- Students can implement network-security protocols based on cryptographic libraries.
ContentThe course will cover topics spanning four broad themes with a focus on the first two themes:
(1) network defense mechanisms such as public-key infrastructures, TLS, VPNs, anonymous-communication systems, secure routing protocols, secure DNS systems, and network intrusion-detection systems;
(2) network attacks such as hijacking, spoofing, denial-of-service (DoS), and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks;
(3) analysis and inference topics such as traffic monitoring and network forensics; and
(4) new technologies related to next-generation networks.

In addition, several guest lectures will provide in-depth insights into specific current real-world network-security topics.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis lecture is intended for students with an interest in securing Internet communication services and network devices. Students are assumed to have knowledge in networking as taught in a communication networks lecture like 252-0064-00L or 227-0120-00L.
Basic knowledge of information security or applied cryptography as taught in 252-0211-00L or 263-4660-00L is beneficial, but an overview of the most important cryptographic primitives will be provided at the beginning of the course.
The course will involve several graded course projects. Students are expected to be familiar with a general-purpose or network programming language such as C/C++, Go, Python, or Rust.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management assessed