Tobias Schmidt: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2023

Award: The Golden Owl
Name Prof. Dr. Tobias Schmidt
FieldEnergy and Technology Policy
Address
Energie- und Technologiepolitik
ETH Zürich, CLD C 12.1
Clausiusstrasse 37
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 04 86
E-mailtobiasschmidt@ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.epg.ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipAssociate Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
151-0928-00LCO2 Capture and Storage and the Industry of Carbon-Based Resources4 credits3GA. Bardow, V. Becattini, N. Gruber, M. Mazzotti, M. Repmann, T. Schmidt, D. Sutter
AbstractThis course introduces the fundamentals of carbon capture, utilization, and storage and related interdependencies between technosphere, ecosphere, and sociosphere. Topics covered: origin, production, processing, and economics of carbon-based resources; climate change in science & policies; CC(U)S systems; CO2 transport & storage; life-cycle assessment; net-zero emissions; CO2 removal options.
ObjectiveThe lecture aims to introduce carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) systems, the technical solutions developed so far, and current research questions. This is done in the context of the origin, production, processing, and economics of carbon-based resources and of climate change issues. After this course, students are familiar with relevant technical and non-technical issues related to using carbon resources, climate change, and CCUS as a mitigation measure.

The class will be structured in 2 hours of lecture and one hour of exercises/discussion.
ContentThe transition to a net-zero society is associated with major challenges in all sectors, including energy, transportation, and industry. In the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C, rapid emission reduction and negative emission technologies are crucial to limiting global warming to below 1.5 °C. Therefore, this course illuminates carbon capture, utilization, and storage as a potential set of technologies for emission mitigation and for generating negative emissions.
Lecture notesLecture slides and supplementary documents will be available online.
LiteratureIPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, 2018.
http://www.ipcc.ch/report/sr15/

IPCC AR5 Climate Change 2014: Synthesis Report, 2014.
https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/syr/

IPCC AR6 Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change, 2022.
https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sixth-assessment-report-working-group-3/

Global Status of CCS 2020. Published by the Global CCS Institute, 2020.
https://www.globalccsinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Global-Status-of-CCS-Report-English.pdf
Prerequisites / NoticeExternal lecturers from the industry and other institutes will contribute with specialized lectures according to the schedule distributed at the beginning of the semester.
227-0664-00LTechnology and Policy of Electrical Energy Storage3 credits2GV. Wood, T. Schmidt
AbstractWith the global emphasis on decreasing CO2 emissions, achieving fossil fuel independence and growing the use of renewables, developing & implementing energy storage solutions for electric mobility & grid stabilization represent a key technology & policy challenge. This course uses lithium ion batteries as a case study to understand the interplay between technology, economics, and policy.
ObjectiveThe students will learn of the complexity involved in battery research, design, production, as well as in investment, economics and policy making around batteries. Students from technical disciplines will gain insights into policy, while students from social science backgrounds will gain insights into technology.
ContentWith the global emphasis on decreasing CO2 emissions, achieving fossil fuel independence, and integrating renewables on the electric grid, developing and implementing energy storage solutions for electric mobility and grid stabilization represent a key technology and policy challenge. The class will focus on lithium ion batteries since they are poised to enter a variety of markets where policy decisions will affect their production, adoption, and usage scenarios. The course considers the interplay between technology, economics, and policy.

* intro to energy storage for electric mobility and grid-stabilization
* basics of battery operation, manufacturing, and integration
* intro to the role of policy for energy storage innovation & diffusion
* discussion of complexities involved in policy and politics of energy storage
Lecture notesMaterials will be made available on the website.
LiteratureMaterials will be made available on the website.
Prerequisites / NoticeStrong interest in energy and technology policy.
851-0653-00LResearch Design for Global Sustainable Development Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
2 credits2SI. Günther, T. Schmidt, K. Shea, E. Tilley
AbstractThe course is for doctoral students who are developing a technology/concept to advance the Sustainable Development Goals and are interested in testing/piloting it in a real-world setting. Building on a proposal that participants develop in advance, the course covers the practical and theoretical considerations involved when taking a technology/concept into a real-world context.
ObjectiveStudents understand the concepts of co-evolution of technology and policy and can evaluate the external validity of a case study. They understand how to determine user needs and design their technology/concept to meet them. They understand how to test the social impact of a technology/concept. They can identify potential ethical issues and develop a mitigation strategy.
ContentThis course is for doctoral students from all ETH departments who are developing a technology or concept to advance the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as part of their PhD and are interested in testing/piloting it in a real-world setting. Building on a short proposal that participants will develop before the course, the 4-day program will address the practical and theoretical considerations involved when taking the technology/concept out of the lab into a real world context. The skills developed will allow participants to iteratively develop their proposal such that it could be competitive if submitted to a funding call.
Special attention will be paid to the common pitfalls of technology testing in complex environments, user-centered design, quantitative evaluation, as well as the fundamentals of project management in an international multi-partner project, paying particular attention to the KFPE principles.
Students will come with a short project proposal that is further developed over the course of the four days and learn the necessary background, theory, and methods to implement and evaluate their technology/concept. Content will be delivered through lectures, workshop sessions and presentations . The success of the course will depend on the student's willingness to apply the material to their own proposal, integrating the feedback of peers and lecturers along the way.
Each morning will consist of a lecture and practical session. The afternoons will include time for workshopping the proposals, as well as a feedback session and group discussion.

Topics covered include:
Innovation/Research Theory: How to think about technological impact ex ante and how to select case studies
Needs-Driven Technologies: How to define the problem/need for which a solution is to be designed/tested
Impact Measurement: How to design a research project that can analyze the social impact of a technological or social innovation
Partnership Administration and Ethics: How to set up and maintain equitable partnerships

We welcome students from all departments, particularly from engineering, computer and natural sciences. Ideally, PhD students are already advanced enough to already have a (first) proposal but not too advanced so that this course only creates afterthoughts. As such, we recommend that students take the course in the first or second year of their doctoral studies.

Importantly, this course is not meant as a comprehensive introduction to the research design skills that a doctoral student should have; rather this is a short overview that will provide insights into the specific methodologies used to translate lab-based research into more complex environments.
Prerequisites / NoticePlease note: Students can only participate in the course if they send a short proposal with the following information about the technology/concept they are developing (max. 2 pages!) via email to alhees@ethz.ch no later than February 20, 2023.

Motivation (which challenge/need will be addressed? Which SDGs are addressed?)
Background (current state of the art)
Describe concept/technology and its novelty
Case study location, targeted context, targeted population
Proposed methodology to test/pilot the technology/concept
860-0005-01LColloquium Science, Technology, and Policy (FS) Information Restricted registration - show details 1 credit1KT. Schmidt, T. Bernauer
AbstractPresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
ObjectivePresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
ContentSee program on the ISTP website: http://www.istp.ethz.ch/events/colloquium.html
860-0014-00LPaper Project on Technology and Policy of Electric Energy Storage Restricted registration - show details
Requirement: Only MSc Science, Technology, and Policy students who have visited the course 227-0664-00L and passed the test at the end of the semester, may sign up for this course.
3 credits2AT. Schmidt, V. Wood
AbstractPaper project on a topic related to main lecture Technology and Policy of Electric Energy Storage. Can only be taken when enrolled in the main lecture.
ObjectiveThe students will choose either a technology or a policy and elaborate on various aspects. The technology questions will include policy aspects; the policy questions will be closely related technological diffusion and innovation.
Lecture notesCourse materials can be found on Moodle.
LiteratureCourse materials can be found on Moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuccessful completion of Technology and Policy of Electric Energy Storage lecture (227-0664-00L).
860-0100-00LDoctoral Colloquium in Public Policy
Only PhD students. Permission from lecturers is required.
1 credit1KM. Krauser, T. Bernauer, R. Garrett, T. Schmidt, B. Steffen
AbstractIn this colloquium, doctoral students present their research plan within the first year of their doctorate, which is reviewed by three professors affiliated with the ISTP and commented on by the peer students registered in the colloquium. We recommend attending the colloquium for two semesters and present the research plan in the second semester.
ObjectiveObtain feedback on research ideas the doctoral research plan and have the research plan approved by three faculty, as required by ETH Zurich.
ContentDoctoral students (typically affiliated with the ISTP or groups of ISTP members) attend this colloquium for one to two semesters. During the first (voluntary) semester they present their preliminary research ideas. During the second (obligatory) semester, they present their research plan, which is reviewed by three professors affiliated with the ISTP. The research plan should not be longer than 20 pages (references excluded). The second semester will be credited with 1 ECTS. All students are supposed to read and comment on their peers’ research ideas and plans throughout both semesters. The results of the review are submitted to the doctoral committee of D-GESS or other ETH departments where ISTP-affiliated doctoral students intend to graduate.
860-0101-00LDesigning Public Policy Research
Only PhD students. Permission from lecturers is required.
2 credits2SB. Steffen, T. Bernauer, Y. Borofsky, T. Schmidt
AbstractPhD students in public policy (or related fields) get an introduction to epistemology and an overview of different methodological approaches. The course will help them design their own (interdisciplinary) research and create meaningful and policy-relevant insights.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to understand how (policy-relevant) knowledge can be created and what the potentials and limits of different research designs and methodologies are.
ContentAfter an introduction to epistemology and the philosophy of science, students will gain insights into different research approaches, including qualitative and quantitative empirical designs, computational modelling, and conceptual and analytical approaches.
860-0201-00LSummer School on Energy Technology, Policy and Politics Restricted registration - show details
Students must apply first online: Link
Students who have been accepted to the Summer School can register at Mystudies.
2 credits3GT. Schmidt
AbstractThe Energy Technology, Policy and Politics Summer School will provide for the first time a comprehensive overview of the technical, socioeconomic and political challenges and opportunities of creating a sustainable energy supply for the future, under the premise of net-​zero (or even negative) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
ObjectiveThe school will enable young scientists to contribute towards the transformation and decarbonisation of the energy system, which will ultimately help solve the challenge of climate change.
ContentThe aim of the summer school is to address the following questions from a technical, economic and policy perspective:

How does the energy supply system function today and potentially in the future?
What are the main challenges and opportunities in achieving a net-​zero GHG emissions energy supply system?
How can needed investments in the energy system be realised?
How can policy accelerate the transition to a net-​zero energy system?
How can political ambition be increased and how can such accelerating policies be implemented?
877-0101-00LTechnology, Society, Markets and the State Restricted registration - show details 6 credits5GT. Schmidt, T. Bernauer, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractTechnological innovation is seldom entirely market-driven but often requires policy intervention. This module will introduce the participants into the literature that aims to understand technology and the underlying markets and its interaction with policy and its underlying politics. Besides an academic perspective, it will introduce practitioners working at the technology-policy interface.
ObjectiveIntroduction:
Participants understand (1) what public policy and policy analysis are, (2) why policy analysis is important for evidence-based policy-making, (3) how policy analysis is undertaken in a consulting firm, and (4) they learn from each other for which current professional challenges policy analysis will be useful.
Technology, Society, Markets, and the State:
Participants understand (1) what the key technological innovations in history have been, (2) how technological innovation unfolds and what factors drive it or slow it down, (3) what role the state (public policy, regulatory frameworks), markets (consumers, firms), and other stakeholders play in this regard.
Political Institutions and Policy-Making Processes:
Understand (1) how electoral systems, legislatures, government, public administrations, the judiciary, and interest groups function and shape policy choices, (2) the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies, (3) how the European Union and international organisations decide on and implement policies.
LiteratureCourse materials can be found on Moodle.