Jonathan Levine: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2018

Name Prof. Dr. Jonathan Levine
FieldPlant Ecology
DepartmentEnvironmental Systems Science
RelationshipAssociate Examiner

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
551-0106-00LFundamentals of Biology IB5 credits5GS. C. Zeeman, J. Levine, O. Y. Martin, M. Stoffel, G. Velicer, A. Wutz
AbstractThis course is an introduction into the basic principles of evolution, diversity, animal/plant form and function, and ecology.
ObjectiveIntroduction into aspects of modern biology and fundamental biological concepts.
ContentThe course is divided into distinct chapters
1. Mechanisms of evolution.
2. The evolutionary history of biological diversity (bacteria and archea, protists, plants and animals).
3. Plant form and function (growth and development, nutrient and resource acquisition, reproduction and environmental responses).
4. Animal form and function (nutrition, immune system, hormones, reproduction, nervous system and behaviour).
5. Ecology (population ecology, community ecology, ecosystems and conservation ecology).
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureThis course is based on the textbook 'Biology' (Campbell, Reece, 9th edition). The structure of the course follows that of the book. It is recommended to purchase the English version.
Prerequisites / NoticePart of the contents of the book need to be learned through independent study.
701-0243-AALBiology III: Essentials of Ecology
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RJ. Levine
AbstractThis course assigns reading for students needing further background for understanding ecological processes. Central problems in ecology, including population growth and regulation, the dynamics of species interactions, the influence of spatial structure, the controls over species invasions, and community responses to environmental change will be explored from basic and applied perspectives.
ObjectiveOriginal language Students will understand how ecological processes operate in natural communities. They will appreciate how mathematical theory, field experimentation, and observational studies combine to generate a predictive science of ecological processes.

Upon completing the course, students will be able to:

Understand the factors determining the outcome of species interactions in communities, and how this information informs management.

Apply theoretical knowledge on species interactions to predict the potential outcomes of novel species introductions.

Understanding the role of spatial structure in mediating population dynamics and persistence, species interactions, and patterns of species diversity.

Use population and community models to predict the stability of interactions between predators and prey and between different competitors.

Understand the conceptual basis of predictions concerning how ecological communities will respond to climate change.
ContentReadings from a text book will focus on understanding central processes in community ecology. Topics will include demographic and spatial structure, consumer resource interactions, food webs, competition, invasion, and the maintenance of species diversity. Each of these more conceptual topics will be discussed in concert with their applications to the conservation and management of species and communities in a changing world.
701-0328-00LAdvanced Ecological Processes Restricted registration - show details
For students of the following study programmes only:
Biology Master
Teaching certificate Biology
Environmental Sciences Master
UZH MNF Biology
UZH MNF Geography /Earth Sciences
4 credits2VJ. Levine
AbstractThis course presents the theoretical and empirical approaches used to understand the ecological processes structuring communities. Central problems in community ecology including the dynamics of species interactions, the influence of spatial structure, the controls over species invasions, and community responses to environmental change will be explored from basic and applied perspectives.
ObjectiveStudents will understand how ecological processes operate in natural communities. They will appreciate how mathematical theory, field experimentation, and observational studies combine to generate a predictive science of ecological processes, and how this predictive science informs conservation and management decisions.

Upon completing the course, students will be able to:

Understand the factors determining the outcome of species interactions in communities, and how this information informs management.

Apply theoretical knowledge on species interactions to predict the potential outcomes of novel species introductions.

Understanding the role of spatial structure in mediating population dynamics and persistence, species interactions, and patterns of species diversity.

Use population and community models to predict the stability of interactions between predators and prey and between different competitors.

Understand the conceptual basis of predictions concerning how ecological communities will respond to climate change.

Discuss the types of conceptual advances ecology as a science can realistically achieve, and how these relate to the applications of the discipline.
ContentLectures supplemented with readings from the primary literature and occasional computer exercises will focus on understanding central processes in community ecology. Topics will include demographic and spatial structure, consumer resource interactions, food webs, competition, mutualism, invasion, the maintenance of species diversity, and species effects on ecosystem processes. Each of these more conceptual topics will be discussed in concert with their applications to the conservation and management of species and communities in a changing world.
701-1410-01LQuantitative Approaches to Plant Population and Community Ecology2 credits2VS. P. Hart, J. Levine
AbstractThis course presents leading problems in plant population and community ecology and modern tools to address them. Topics include the nature of species coexistence, the factors regulating the success and spread of plant invasions, and community responses to human impacts. Students are engaged in discussions of primary literature and develop new scientific skills through practical exercises.
ObjectiveStudents will attain deep insight into topics at the cutting edge of plant ecology/evolutionary research, whilst developing specific skills that can later be applied to basic and applied ecological problems.
701-1461-00LEcology and Evolution: Seminar Restricted registration - show details
Direct continuation of course unit 701-1460-00L "Ecology and Evolution: Term Paper" of the previous semester (HS).
3 credits6ST. Städler, S. Bonhoeffer, A. Hall, J. Jokela, J. Levine, G. Velicer, A. Widmer
AbstractThe organization and functioning of academic research as well as academic publishing are introduced and applied: students critically review two term papers written by their student colleagues. Based on the reviews, the authors of the papers write reply letters and revise their own term papers. They finally present their topic during an in-house "mini-conference" with a talk.
Objective• Students become familiar with the academic peer-review and publishing process
• They learn to evaluate the quality of a manuscript and formulate constructive criticism
• They learn to deal with criticism of their own work (by their student peers)
• They practise oral presentations and discussions in English
ContentThe organization and functioning of academic research as well as academic publishing are introduced and applied: students critically review two term papers written by their student colleagues. Based on the reviews, the authors of the papers write reply letters and revise their own term papers. They finally present their topic during an in-house "mini-conference" with a talk.
Lecture notesnone
Prerequisites / NoticeDirect continuation of "Ecology and Evolution: Term Paper" of the previous semester