Alicia Elizabeth Smith: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2018

Name Dr. Alicia Elizabeth Smith
Address
Institut für Biochemie
ETH Zürich, HPM G 6.2
Otto-Stern-Weg 3
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 31 37
E-mailalicia.smith@bc.biol.ethz.ch
DepartmentBiology
RelationshipLecturer

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
551-0320-00LCellular Biochemistry (Part II)3 credits2VY. Barral, R. Kroschewski, A. E. Smith
AbstractThis course will focus on molecular mechanisms and concepts underlying cellular biochemistry, providing advanced insights into the structural and functional details of individual cell components, and the complex regulation of their interactions. Particular emphasis will be on the spatial and temporal integration of different molecules and signaling pathways into global cellular processes.
ObjectiveThe full-year course (551-0319-00 & 551-0320-00) focuses on the molecular mechanisms and concepts underlying the biochemistry of cellular physiology, investigating how these processes are integrated to carry out highly coordinated cellular functions. The molecular characterization of complex cellular functions requires a combination of approaches such as biochemistry, but also cell biology and genetics. This course is therefore the occasion to discuss these techniques and their integration in modern cellular biochemistry.
The students will be able to describe the structural and functional details of individual cell components, and the spatial and temporal regulation of their interactions. In particular, they will learn to explain how different molecules and signaling pathways can be integrated during complex and highly dynamic cellular processes such as intracellular transport, cytoskeletal rearrangements, cell motility, and cell division. In addition, they will be able to illustrate the relevance of particular signaling pathways for cellular pathologies such as cancer or during cellular infection.
ContentSpatial and temporal integration of different molecules and signaling pathways into global cellular processes, such as cell division, cell infection and cell motility. Emphasis is also put on the understanding of pathologies associated with defective cell physiology, such as cancer or during cellular infection.
LiteratureRecommended supplementary literature (review articles and selected primary literature) will be provided during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo attend this course the students must have a solid basic knowledge in chemistry, biochemistry, cell biology and general biology. Biology students have in general already attended the first part of the "Cellular Biochemistry" concept course (551-0319-00). The course will be taught in English.
In addition, the course will be based on a blended-learning scenario, where frontal lectures will be complemented with carefully chosen web-based teaching elements that students access through the ETH Moodle platform.
551-1310-00LA Problem-Based Approach to Cellular Biochemistry Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.
6 credits2GM. Peter, E. Dultz, M. Gstaiger, V. Korkhov, B. Kornmann, V. Panse, A. E. Smith
AbstractIndependent, guided acquisition of an overview over a defined area of research, identification of important open questions, development of an experimental strategy to address a defined question, and formulation of this strategy within the framework of a research grant.
ObjectiveThe students will learn to acquire independently an overview over a defined area of research, and to identify important open questions. In addition, they will learn to develop an experimental strategy to address a defined question, and to formulate this strategy within the framework of a research grant.
ContentThe students will work in groups of two to three, in close contact with a tutor (ETH Prof or senior scientist). The overview and the small research grant will be developed independently by the students, with guidance from the tutor through regular mandatory meetings. The students will write both the overview and the grant in short reports, and present them to their colleagues.
LiteratureThe identification of appropriate literature is a component of the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course will be taught in english, and requires extensive independent work.