Oliver Yves Martin: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2021

Name Dr. Oliver Yves Martin
Address
Institut für Integrative Biologie
ETH Zürich, CHN G 26.2
Universitätstrasse 16
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 36 60
E-mailoliver.martin@env.ethz.ch
DepartmentBiology
RelationshipLecturer

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
551-0001-AALGeneral Biology I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RU. Sauer, O. Y. Martin, A. Widmer
AbstractOrganismic biology to teach the basic principles of classical and molecular genetics, evolutionary biology and phylogeny.
ObjectiveThe understanding of basic principles of biology (inheritance, evolution and phylogeny) and an overview of the diversity of life.
ContentThe first semester focuses on the organismal biology aspects of genetics, evolution and diversity of life in the Campbell chapters 12-34.

Week 1-7 by Alex Widmer, Chapters 12-25
12 Cell biology Mitosis
13 Genetics Sexual life cycles and meiosis
14 Genetics Mendelian genetics
15 Genetics Linkage and chromosomes
20 Genetics Evolution of genomes
21 Evolution How evolution works
22 Evolution Phylogentic reconstructions
23 Evolution Microevolution
24 Evolution Species and speciation
25 Evolution Macroevolution

Week 8-14 by Oliver Martin, Chapters 26-34
26 Diversity of Life Introdution to viruses
27 Diversity of Life Prokaryotes
28 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of eukaryotes
29 Diversity of Life Nonvascular&seedless vascular plants
30 Diversity of Life Seed plants
31 Diversity of Life Introduction to fungi
32 Diversity of Life Overview of animal diversity
33 Diversity of Life Introduction to invertebrates
34 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of vertebrates
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureCampbell et al. (2017) Biology - A Global Approach. 11th Edition (Global Edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a virtual self-study lecture for non-german speakers of the "Allgemeine Biology I (551-0001-00L) lecture. The exam will be written jointly with the participants of this lecture.

Example exam questions will be discussed during the lectures, and old exam questions are kept by the various student organisations. If necessary, please contact Prof. Uwe Sauer (sauer@ethz.ch) for details regarding the exam.
551-0001-00LGeneral Biology I Restricted registration - show details 3 credits3VU. Sauer, O. Y. Martin, A. Widmer
AbstractOrganismic biology to teach the basic principles of classical and molecular genetics, evolutionary biology and phylogeny.
First in a series of two lectures given over two semesters for students of agricultural and food sciences, as well as of environmental sciences.
ObjectiveThe understanding of some basic principles of biology (inheritance, evolution and phylogeny) and an overview of the diversity of life.
ContentThe first semester focuses on the organismal biology aspects of genetics, evolution and diversity of life in the Campbell chapters 12-34.

Week 1-7 by Alex Widmer, Chapters 12-25
12 Cell biology Mitosis
13 Genetics Sexual life cycles and meiosis
14 Genetics Mendelian genetics
15 Genetics Linkage and chromosomes
20 Genetics Evolution of genomes
21 Evolution How evolution works
22 Evolution Phylogentic reconstructions
23 Evolution Microevolution
24 Evolution Species and speciation
25 Evolution Macroevolution

Week 8-14 by Oliver Martin, Chapters 26-34
26 Diversity of Life Introdution to viruses
27 Diversity of Life Prokaryotes
28 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of eukaryotes
29 Diversity of Life Nonvascular&seedless vascular plants
30 Diversity of Life Seed plants
31 Diversity of Life Introduction to fungi
32 Diversity of Life Overview of animal diversity
33 Diversity of Life Introduction to invertebrates
34 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of vertebrates
Lecture notesno script
LiteratureCampbell et al. (2017) Biology - A Global Approach. 11th Edition (Global Edition
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture is the first in a series of two lectures given over two semesters for students with biology as as a basic subject.
551-0003-AALGeneral Biology I+II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
7 credits13RU. Sauer, K. Bomblies, O. Y. Martin, A. Widmer
AbstractGeneral Biology I: Organismic biology to teach the basic principles of classical and molecular genetics, evolutionary biology and phylogeny.

General Biology II: Molecular biology approach to teach the basic principles of biochemistry, cell biology, cgenetics, evolutionary biology and form and function of vacular plants.
ObjectiveGeneral Biology I: The understanding of basic principles of biology (inheritance, evolution and phylogeny) and an overview of the diversity of life.

General Biology II: The understanding basic concepts of biology: the hierarchy of the structural levels of biological organisation, with particular emphasis on the cell and its molecular functions, the fundamentals of metabolism and molecular genetics, as well as form and function of vascular plants.
ContentGeneral Biology I:
General Biology I focuses on the organismal biology aspects of genetics, evolution and diversity of life in the Campbell chapters 12-34.

Week 1-7 by Alex Widmer, Chapters 12-25
12 Cell biology Mitosis
13 Genetics Sexual life cycles and meiosis
14 Genetics Mendelian genetics
15 Genetics Linkage and chromosomes
20 Genetics Evolution of genomes
21 Evolution How evolution works
22 Evolution Phylogentic reconstructions
23 Evolution Microevolution
24 Evolution Species and speciation
25 Evolution Macroevolution

Week 8-14 by Oliver Martin, Chapters 26-34
26 Diversity of Life Introdution to viruses
27 Diversity of Life Prokaryotes
28 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of eukaryotes
29 Diversity of Life Nonvascular&seedless vascular plants
30 Diversity of Life Seed plants
31 Diversity of Life Introduction to fungi
32 Diversity of Life Overview of animal diversity
33 Diversity of Life Introduction to invertebrates
34 Diversity of Life Origin & evolution of vertebrates


General Biology II: The structure and function of biomacromolecules; basics of metabolism; tour of the cell; membrane structure and function; basic energetics of cellular processes; respiration, photosynthesis; cell cycle, from gene to protein; structure and growth of vascular plants, resource acquisition and transport, soil and plant nutrition.

Specifically the following Campbell chapters will be covered:
3 Biochemistry Chemistry of water
4 Biochemistry Carbon: the basis of molecular diversity
5 Biochemistry Biological macromolecules and lipids
7 Cell biology Cell structure and function
8 Cell biology Cell membranes
10 Cell biology Respiration: introduction to metabolism
10 Cell biology Cell respiration
11 Cell biology Photosynthetic processes
16 Genetics Nucleic acids and inheritance
17 Genetics Expression of genes
18 Genetics Control of gene expression
19 Genetics DNA Technology
35 Plant structure&function Plant Structure and Growth
36 Plant structure&function Transport in vascular plants
37 Plant structure&function Plant nutrition
38 Plant structure&function Reproduction of flowering plants
39 Plant structure&function Plants signal and behavior
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureCampbell et al. (2017) Biology - A Global Approach. 11th Edition (Global Edition)
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic general and organic chemistry


This is a virtual self-study lecture for non-German speakers of the "Allgemeine Biology I (551-0001-00L) and "Allgemeine Biology II (551-0002-00L) lectures. The exam will be written jointly with the participants of this lecture.
551-0127-00LFundamentals of Biology III: Multicellularity8 credits6GM. Stoffel, M. Künzler, O. Y. Martin, U. Suter, S. Werner, A. Wutz, S. C. Zeeman
AbstractThe lecture conveys the fundamental concepts underlying multicellularity with an emphasis on the molecular basis of multicellular biological systems and their functional integration into coherent wholes. The structural and functional specialization in multicellular organisms will be discussed by highlighting common and specific functions in fungi, plants, and animals (including humans).
Objective1.Students can describe advantages and challenges associated with being multicellular and outline independent solutions that organisms have developed to cope with the challenges of complex multicellularity
.
2.Students can explain how the internal and external structures of fungi, plants and animals function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

3.Students can explain the basic pathways and mechanisms of cellular communication regulating cellular behavior (cell adhesion, metabolism, proliferation, reproduction, development).

4.Students can describe how a single cell develops from one cell into many, each with different specialized functions.
ContentThe lecture introduces the structural and functional specialization in fungi, plants and animals, including humans. After providing an overview on the diversity of eukaryotic organisms, the lecture will discuss how fungi, plants, animals and humans have evolved structures and strategies to cope with the challenges of multicellularity. The molecular basis underlying communication, coordination and differentiation will be conveyed and complemented by key aspects of reproduction, metabolism development, and regeneration. Topics include form and function of fungi and plants, human anatomy and physiology, metabolism, cell signaling, adhesion, stem cells, regeneration, reproduction, and development.
LiteratureAlberts et al. 'Molecular Biology of the Cell' 6th edition
Smith A.M., et al. “Plant Biology” Garland Science, New York, Oxford
Campbell “Biology”, 11th Edition
Prerequisites / NoticeSome lecture are held in English.
551-0127-01LPlants and Fungi4 credits3GS. C. Zeeman, M. Künzler, O. Y. Martin
AbstractThe lecture conveys the fundamental concepts underlying multicellularity with an emphasis on the molecular basis of multicellular biological systems and their functional integration into coherent wholes. The structural and functional specialization in multicellular organisms will be discussed by highlighting common and specific functions in fungi and plant.s
Objective1.Students can describe advantages and challenges associated with being multicellular and outline independent solutions that organisms have developed to cope with the challenges of complex multicellularity
.
2.Students can explain how the internal and external structures of fungi and plants function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

3.Students can explain the basic pathways and mechanisms of cellular communication regulating cellular behavior (cell adhesion, metabolism, proliferation, reproduction, development).

4.Students can describe how a single cell develops from one cell into many, each with different specialized functions.
ContentThe lecture introduces the structural and functional specialization in fungi and plants. After providing an overview on the diversity of eukaryotic organisms, the lecture will discuss how fungi and plants have evolved structures and strategies to cope with the challenges of multicellularity. The molecular basis underlying communication, coordination and differentiation will be conveyed and complemented by key aspects of reproduction, metabolism development, and regeneration. Topics include form and function of fungi and plants, metabolism, cell signaling, adhesion, stem cells, regeneration, reproduction, and development.
LiteratureAlberts et al. 'Molecular Biology of the Cell' 6th edition
Smith A.M., et al. “Plant Biology” Garland Science, New York, Oxford
Campbell “Biology”, 11th Edition
Prerequisites / NoticeSome lecture are held in English.
551-0435-00LSystematic Biology: Zoology Restricted registration - show details
Does not take place this semester.
3 credits2V + 2PO. Y. Martin, M. Greeff
AbstractLecture: The lecture provides an overview of animal diversity. Using key selected groups, phylogenetic, morphological and ecological aspects are addressed. Two priority topics are the arthropods and the vertebrates (including vertebrate fauna of Switzerland).

Practical: Knowledge of selected animal groups and their characteristics (supplementing the lecture) and of the basic methods.
ObjectiveLecture: The systematic classification of animals and the characteristics of the most important animal groups, basic animal body plans.

Practical: Examples of selected animal groups and their characteristics; acquire the relevant skills: simple preparations, dissection, microscopy, drawing, protocols.
ContentLecture: Body plans, characteristics, diversity and phylogenetic position of the main groups of Protozoa, Invertebrates, and Vertebrates, with a special focus on Arthropods and Vertebrates (including vertebrate fauna of Switzerland).

Practical: Macroscopic and microscopic study of selected Protozoa, Invertebrates (especially insects) and Vertebrates: morphology and anatomy; behaviour, mainly locomotion, feeding, and reproduction.
Lecture notesScripts can be downloaded from Moodle, and additional material will be handed out (particularly in the practical).
LiteratureNo further literature required, the script contains suggestions for further reading.