David J. Norris: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2021

Award: The Golden Owl
Name Prof. Dr. David J. Norris
FieldMaterials Engineering
Address
Professur für Material-Engineering
ETH Zürich, LEE P 210
Leonhardstrasse 21
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 53 60
E-maildnorris@ethz.ch
DepartmentMechanical and Process Engineering
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
151-0911-00LIntroduction to Plasmonics
Does not take place this semester.
4 credits2V + 1UD. J. Norris
AbstractThis course provides fundamental knowledge of surface plasmon polaritons and discusses their applications in plasmonics.
ObjectiveElectromagnetic oscillations known as surface plasmon polaritons have many unique properties that are useful across a broad set of applications in biology, chemistry, physics, and optics. The field of plasmonics has arisen to understand the behavior of surface plasmon polaritons and to develop applications in areas such as catalysis, imaging, photovoltaics, and sensing. In particular, metallic nanoparticles and patterned metallic interfaces have been developed to utilize plasmonic resonances. The aim of this course is to provide the basic knowledge to understand and apply the principles of plasmonics. The course will strive to be approachable to students from a diverse set of science and engineering backgrounds.
ContentFundamentals of Plasmonics
- Basic electromagnetic theory
- Optical properties of metals
- Surface plasmon polaritons on surfaces
- Surface plasmon polariton propagation
- Localized surface plasmons

Applications of Plasmonics
- Waveguides
- Extraordinary optical transmission
- Enhanced spectroscopy
- Sensing
- Metamaterials
Lecture notesClass notes and handouts
LiteratureS. A. Maier, Plasmonics: Fundamentals and Applications, 2007, Springer
Prerequisites / NoticePhysics I, Physics II
529-0010-00LChemistry Restricted registration - show details 3 credits2V + 1UA. de Mello, F. Jenny, C. Mondelli, D. J. Norris, S. Stavrakis
AbstractThis is a general chemistry course aimed at first year undergraduate students in the Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering (D-MAVT) and graduate students in the Department of Architecture (D-ARCH).
ObjectiveThe aims of the course are as follows:
1) To provide a thorough understanding of the basic principles of chemistry and its application.
2) To develop an understanding of the atomic and molecular nature of matter and of the chemical reactions that describe its transformations.
3) To emphasize areas considered most relevant in an engineering context.
ContentElectronic structure of atoms, chemical bonding, molecular geometry and bonding theories, intermolecular forces, gases, thermodynamics, chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, equilibria, liquids and solutions, acids and bases, redox- and electrochemistry.
Lecture notesSlides are available prior to every lecture and can be downloaded from Moodle.
LiteratureThe course is based on "Chemistry The Central Science" by Brown, LeMay, Bursten, Murphy, Woodward, and Stoltzfus. Pearson, 14th Edition in SI units (global edition).
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingfostered
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationfostered
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Customer Orientationfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence fostered
Sensitivity to Diversityfostered
Negotiationfostered
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilityfostered
Creative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingfostered
Integrity and Work Ethicsfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
Self-direction and Self-management fostered