Bernd Wollscheid: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Name Prof. Dr. Bernd Wollscheid
Address
Dep. Gesundheitswiss. und Technol.
ETH Zürich, HPM H 27
Otto-Stern-Weg 3
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 633 36 84
E-mailbernd.wollscheid@hest.ethz.ch
DepartmentHealth Sciences and Technology
RelationshipAdjunct Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
551-0324-00LSystems Biology Information 6 credits4VP. Picotti, M. Claassen, U. Sauer, B. Snijder, B. Wollscheid
AbstractIntroduction to experimental and computational methods of systems biology. By using baker’s yeast as a thread through the series, we focus on global methods for analysis of and interference with biological functions. Illustrative applications to other organisms will highlight medical and biotechnological aspects.
Objective- obtain an overview of global analytical methods
- obtain an overview of computational methods in systems biology
- understand the concepts of systems biology
ContentOverview of global analytical methods (e.g. DNA arrays, proteomics, metabolomics, fluxes etc), global interference methods (siRNA, mutant libraries, synthetic lethality etc.) and imaging methods. Introduction to mass spectrometry and proteomics. Concepts of metabolism in microbes and higher cells. Systems biology of developmental processes. Concepts of mathematical modeling and applications of computational systems biology.
Lecture notesno script
LiteratureThe course is not taught by a particular book, but some books are suggested for further reading:

- Systems biology in Practice by Klipp, Herwig, Kowald, Wierling und Lehrach. Wiley-VCH 2005
551-0362-00LMolecular Health: Biomedical Analysis of the Extracellular Interactome Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.

General safety regulations for all block courses:
-Whenever possible the distance rules have to be respected
-All students have to wear masks throughout the course. Please keep reserve masks ready. Surgical masks (IIR) or medical grade masks (FFP2) without a valve are permitted. Community masks (fabric masks) are not allowed.
-The installation and activation of the Swiss Covid-App is highly encouraged
-Any additional rules for individual courses have to be respected
-Students showing any COVID-19 symptoms are not allowed to enter ETH buildings and have to inform the course responsible
6 credits7PB. Wollscheid, E. Tschudy-Milani
AbstractIn this course you will learn to measure, integrate, analyze and validate the cellular surfaceome as a complex information gateway connecting the intracellular to the extracellular interactome. You will apply next generation technologies at the interface of biology, chemistry, medicine and bioinformatics to establish the surfaceome proteotype and its signaling interaction networks.
Objective"If a cell surface molecule such as the B cell receptor would have the size of a human being, then the cell surface of a B cell would have roughly the size of three times NYC Central Park." How many people/proteins/proteoforms reside in this space ("Surfaceome")? Similar to humans, proteins don't act alone. Function is encoded in dynamic protein-protein interactions. How are these proteoforms organized in signaling islands/networks in order to fulfill specific cellular functions ("Interactome")? What are the ligands interacting with the surfaceome to communicate information from other cells & tissues in the body? What goes wrong in these signaling islands if we get sick?

In this course you will learn to measure, integrate, analyze and validate the cellular surfaceome and its signaling islands as a complex information gateway connecting the intracellular to the extracellular interactome. You will apply next generation technologies at the interface of biology, chemistry, medicine and bioinformatics to generate unprecedented data to establish the surfaceome proteotype and its signaling interaction networks. This digital proteotype data layer provides the basis for generating qualitative and quantitative surfaceome models explaining how molecular nanoscale organization influences cellular signaling and biological function.
Content"If a cell surface molecule such as the B cell receptor would have the size of a human being, then the cell surface of a B cell would have roughly the size of three times NYC Central Park." How many people/proteins/proteoforms reside in this space ("Surfaceome")? Similar to humans, proteins don't act alone. Function is encoded in dynamic protein-protein interactions. How are these proteoforms organized in signaling islands/networks in order to fulfill specific cellular functions ("Interactome")? What are the ligands interacting with the surfaceome to communicate information from other cells & tissues in the body? What goes wrong in these signaling islands if we get sick?

In this course you will learn to measure, integrate, analyze and validate the cellular surfaceome and its signaling islands as a complex information gateway connecting the intracellular to the extracellular interactome. You will apply next generation technologies at the interface of biology, chemistry, medicine and bioinformatics to generate unprecedented data to establish the surfaceome proteotype and its signaling interaction networks. This digital proteotype data layer provides the basis for generating qualitative and quantitative surfaceome models explaining how molecular nanoscale organization influences cellular signaling and biological function.
LiteratureD. Bausch-Fluck, E. S. Milani, B. Wollscheid, Surfaceome nanoscale organization and extracellular interaction networks, Curr. Opin. Chem. Biol. 48, 26–33 (2019).

https://paperpile.com/shared/ud6iWG
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course requires a basic knowledge in mass spectrometry based proteomics and experience in computational data processing using R or MatLab. Ideally this course should be combined with course 551-0352-00L "Introduction to Mass Spectrometry-based Proteomics".
551-1304-00LBiochemistry Information Restricted registration - show details
Only for Health Sciences and Technology BSc and Human Medicine BSc.
3 credits3VU. K. Genick, M. Peter, B. Wollscheid
AbstractThe course introduces students to the central facts and concepts of biochemistry and covers topics ranging from the structure, physicochemical properties and function of biomolecules; enzymes and their function; human metabolism and its regulation to signal transduction and motor proteins.
ObjectiveThe detailed learning goals of the course can be viewed on the course's Moodle page.
Lecture notesThere is no traditional script for this course. Instead the course is supported by a Moodle page through which students have access to all necessary texts, exercises, videos and activities.
LiteratureThe essential course material will be available on the course's Moodle Page in the form of scripts and lesson handouts.
The course does not have an "official" textbook, but students may find a general reference book on the topic interesting. For this purpose, the text "Löffler/Petrides Biochemie und Pathobiochemie" ISBN 978-3-642-17971-6 may be interesting.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course builds on the content of the courses "Chemie für Mediziner" and "Molekulare Genetik und Zellbiologie".