Laura Nyström: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Name Prof. Dr. Laura Nyström
FieldFood Biochemistry
Address
Inst.f. Lebensm.wiss.,Ern.,Ges.
ETH Zürich, LFO F 19
Schmelzbergstrasse 9
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 91 65
E-maillaura.nystroem@hest.ethz.ch
DepartmentHealth Sciences and Technology
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
752-0020-00LExcursions I Restricted registration - show details
Only for students enrolled in the study program Food Science BSc 4th semester.
1 credit2PL. Nyström, S. Gouinguené
AbstractThe course offers excursions related to various themes in Food Sciences.
ObjectiveExcursions I will build a bridge between the theoretical knowledge obtained in the lectures with the commonly applied current practices in the field. Visits to the industry and various laboratories will support the students in understanding the areas related to food production, processing and control. They will also provide insights to possible future job profiles and employers.
ContentStudents will acquire a practical insight to various areas and themes in Food Science.
Lecture notesA detailed program with information about the contents and administrative issues regarding each excursion will be provided to the participants.
Prerequisites / NoticeDetails about the registration to the excursions will be announced at the beginning of the semester.
752-0021-00LExcursions II Restricted registration - show details
Only for students enrolled in the study program Food Science BSc 6th semester.
1 credit2PL. Nyström, S. Gouinguené
AbstractThe course offers excursions related to various themes in Food Sciences.
ObjectiveExcursions II will deepen the know-how of the students in Food Science related themes, and will link the knowledge to common practices in the food industry. Visits to companies, laboratories and authorities will support in obtaining a holistic view of the practices in the field, and will offer an insight to potential future professions.
ContentStudents will acquire a practical insight to various areas and themes in Food Science, namely Food Biotechnology, Food Microbiology, Food Processing, Food Chemistry and Analytics, Quality Assurance, and Human Nutrition.
Lecture notesA detailed program with information about the contents and administrative issues regarding each excursion will be provided to the participants.
Prerequisites / NoticeDetails about the registration to the excursions will be announced at the beginning of the semester.
752-1000-AALFood Chemistry I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RL. Nyström, M. Erzinger
AbstractTo familiarise with the structure, properties and reactivity of food constituents. To understand the relationship between the multiple chemical reactions and the quality of food.
ObjectiveTo familiarise with the structure, properties and reactivity of food constituents. To understand the relationship between the multiple chemical reactions and the quality of food.
ContentDescriptive chemistry of food constituents (proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, plant phenolics, flavour compounds).
Reactions which affect the colour, flavour, texture, and the nutritional value of food raw materials and food products during processing, storage and preparation in a positive or in a negative way (e.g. lipid oxidation, Maillard reaction, enzymatic browning).
Links to food analysis, food processing, and nutrition.
LiteratureIntroductory Food Chemistry, John W. Brady, Cornell University Press, New York, 2013. Selected sections.
752-1004-00LLaboratory Course in Food Chemistry Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: Students may only enrol once they have followed the courses Food Chemistry I (752-1000-00L) and Food Analysis I (752-1101-00L).

Number of participants limited: 40 places expected
3 credits4PL. Nyström, M. Erzinger
AbstractIntroduction to important methods of food analysis.
Methods: Titrimetry, spectrometry (UV/VIS), chromatography (TLC, HPLC, GC), enzymatic analysis, Kjeldahl analysis.
ObjectiveTo become acquainted with important methods of food analysis.
ContentAnalysis of important constituents (carbohydrates, fat, protein, water) of food raw materials and food products.

Methods: Titrimetry, spectrometry (UV/VIS), chromatography (TLC, HPLC, GC), enzymatic analysis, Kjeldahl analysis.
Lecture notesAll material is available via the Moodle platform.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
1. Attendance of the course Food Chemistry I (752-1000-00L).
2. Attendance of the course Food Analysis I (752-1101-00L) in parallel to the lab course.

Performance assessment consists of 5 parts:
- Attendance of the introductory lectures in the first week of the semester (Monday and Tuesday)
- Attendance and active participation in the laboratory courses (also in the last week of the semester)
- Successful execution of the test experiment at the end of the semester
- Peer-review of lab reports from other students
- Timely submission of the worksheets and lab reports (average of graded reports must be sufficient)

General Information:
The course will be run in two groups, which alternate (in general) on a two week cycle. As a general rule, each student should attend the course every other week on Monday and Tuesday. The weeks in between are reserved for independent preparation of the next experiments and report writing as well as reviewing reports from colleagues.

There may be deviations from this two weekly schedule due to public holidays. Therefore it can happen that students need to participate in the course in two consecutive weeks. Students will be divided in the two groups during the first week of the semester and will then receive the definitive personal schedule for the course.

Absences during the semester due to military service, personal holidays etc. cannot be accommodated.
752-1022-00LSelected Topics in Food Chemistry3 credits2GL. Nyström, M. Erzinger
AbstractThis course is centered in cereal chemistry: main chemical components related to physicochemical, technological and nutritional properties of grain products.
ObjectiveThe main goal of the course are:
Understand the chemical composition and properties of cereal grains as raw materials for food, changes in composition during grain processing, and the effects of both on the nutritional properties of grain based products, such as breads, pasta, and breakfast cereals.
ContentThe course covers fundamental and modern aspects of cereal chemistry: composition of grains, physicochemical properties of main grain components (starch, proteins, fibres, lipids), and their effects on technological and nutritional properties of cereal grain products. Focus is put on chemical reactions and changes during common food processing (dough making, baking, extrusion, fermentation), reflecting also their effects on the nutritional and sensory properties of grain products. Furthermore, a special emphasis is put on dietary fibres and related phytochemicals in grains: Different dietary fibre compounds found in cereals and cereal products (cellulose, arabinoxylan, beta-glucan, resistant starch etc.), co-passengers of dietary fibre (phenolic acids, plant sterols, tocols, folates, alkylresorcinols, avenanthramides), factors affecting their levels in foods, and methods used for the analysis of their content and composition.
Lecture notesThe lectures are supplemented with handouts./ Es werden Beilagen zur Vorlesung abgegeben.
Prerequisites / NoticeCourse prerequisites: Food Chemistry I/II and Food Analysis I/II (or equivalent)
752-1030-00LFood Biochemistry Laboratory Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12

The lab course will only be held with a minimum of 6 and a maximum of 12 participants.
3 credits5PL. Nyström, S. Boulos, M. Erzinger
AbstractAdvanced laboratory course on analytical techniques used in food chemistry and biochemistry.
ObjectiveAfter attending the course, the students are able to:
- apply sample pre-treatment methods for modern chemical/biochemical analysis
- operate advanced analytical instruments (UV-Vis, HPLC, GC) for sample analyses
- critically analyze primary experimental data (including evaluating measurement uncertainty), and evaluate data with statistical methods.
Prerequisites / NoticeFood Chemistry I and II, Food Analysis I and II, Laboratory Course in Food Chemistry, or equivalent.
752-1101-AALFood Analysis I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RL. Nyström
AbstractTo understand the basic principles of analytical chemistry. To get acquainted with the principles and applications of important routine methods of instrumental food analysis (UV/VIS, IR, AAS, GC, HPLC).
ObjectiveTo understand the basic principles of analytical chemistry. To get acquainted with the principles and applications of important routine methods of instrumental food analysis (UV/VIS, IR, AAS, GC, HPLC).
ContentFundamentals: Chemical concentrations. The analytical process (sampling, sample preparation, calibration, measurement, statistical evaluation of analytical results). Errors in quantitative analysis. Important parameters of an analytical procedure (accuracy, precision, limit of detection, sensitivity, specificity/selectivity).

Methods: Optical spectroscopy (basic principles, UV/VIS, IR, and atomic absorption spectroscopy). Chromatography (GC, HPLC).
LiteratureFood Analysis - Fourth Edition, edited by S. Suzanne Nielson; 2010; Springer, Selected sections.
752-1101-00LFood Analysis I3 credits2VL. Nyström, S. Boulos, M. Erzinger
AbstractTo understand the basic principles of analytical chemistry. To get acquainted with the principles and applications of important routine methods of instrumental food analysis (UV/VIS, IR, NMR, MS, AAS, GC, HPLC).
ObjectiveTo understand the basic principles of analytical chemistry. To get acquainted with the principles and applications of important routine methods of instrumental food analysis (UV/VIS, IR, NMR, MS, AAS, GC, HPLC).
ContentFundamentals: Chemical concentrations. The analytical process (sampling, sample preparation, calibration, measurement, statistical evaluation of analytical results). Errors in quantitative analysis. Important parameters of an analytical procedure (accuracy, precision, limit of detection, sensitivity, specificity/selectivity).

Methods: Optical spectroscopy (basic principles, UV/VIS, IR,NMR, MS, and atomic absorption spectroscopy). Chromatography (GC, HPLC).
Lecture notesThe lectures are supplemented with handouts.
Literaturea) Georg Schwedt, Analytische Chemie, 2. vollständig überarbeitete Auflage 2008
b) R. Matissek, G. Steiner, M. Fischer, Lebensmittelanalytik, 5. Auflage 2014