Shana J. Sturla: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2023

Name Prof. Dr. Shana J. Sturla
FieldToxicology
Address
Dep. Gesundheitswiss. und Technol.
ETH Zürich, LFO D 15.1
Schmelzbergstrasse 9
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 91 75
E-mailshana.sturla@hest.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.toxicology.ethz.ch
DepartmentHealth Sciences and Technology
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
529-0032-00LEthics and Scientific Integrity for Doctoral Students in Chemistry1 credit2SC. Copéret, S. J. Sturla
AbstractThis course sensitises doctoral students to ethical issues that may occur during their doctorate. After an introduction to ethics and good scientific practice, students are familiarised with resources that can assist them with ethical decision-making. Students get the chance to apply their knowledge in a context specific to research in chemistry.
ObjectiveDoctoral students learn how to identify, analyse and address ethical issues in their own scientific research. In addition, they will reflect on their professional role as scientific researchers.
ContentPart I on Moodle
The self-paced e-learning course on Moodle consists of 5 modules:

Module 1: Ethics
-Introduction to moral theory (with emphasis on practical guidance regarding decision making)
Module 2: Ethics in scientific research
-Introduction to ethical issues that occur within scientific research( i.e. regarding authorship, cooperation, data use and sharing, and other aspects that are subject to scientific integrity and good scientific practice)
Module 3: Collecting resources
-A variety of tools and resources that help identify ethical issues are presented and explained
Module 4: Setting up a Strategy
-Example examination of a case regarding its ethical scope (students develop their own strategy to examine situations for their ethical implications).
Module 5: Making decisions
-Different ways of addressing ethical issues are presented and explained (i.e. how to make hard choices, or solve ethical dilemmas. But also where to seek advice if needed).

Part II
The second, face-to-face part of this course focuses on chemistry-specific aspects. It provides an interactive learning environment. Students get to apply their knowledge, and they are encouraged to reflect on ethical problems and to critically discuss them with fellow doctoral students.
Lecture notesMoodle
752-0005-00LColloquium in Food and Nutrition Science1 credit2KS. J. Sturla
AbstractParticipation in weekly seminars on a variety of topics including Food Microbiology, Food Toxicology, Food Biochemistry, Food Processing, Consumer Behavior, Food Technology, and Food Materials and Technology, and oral presentation of a selected published study in one of these areas inspired by participation in the seminars.
ObjectiveThe objectives are to become familiar with and stimulate interest in leading-edge science related to the research topics of the Institute of Food, Nutrition and Health. Participants attend weekly seminars given by external and internal speakers, and are also required to deliver a presentation on a recent research article inspired by a topic from the semester presentations.
752-1300-00LIntroduction to Toxicology3 credits2VS. J. Sturla, F. Michailidou, K. Schirmer, C. vom Berg-Maurer
AbstractIntroduction to how chemical properties and biological interactions govern the disposition and influences of toxicants.
ObjectiveThe objectives are for the student to establish a framework for examining adverse effects resulting from exposures to toxicants by understanding key mechanisms that give rise to toxic responses and disease processes.

In the course "Introduction to Toxicology", the competencies of process understanding, system understanding, concept development, data analysis & interpretation and measurement methods are taught, applied and examined.
ContentThis course will introduce mechanisms governing the chemical disposition and biological influences of toxicants. The course is geared toward advanced bachelors students in food science, environmental science, and related disciplines, such as chemistry, biology and pharmaceutical sciences. Examples of topics include: dose-response relationships and risk assessment, absorption, transport, and biotransformation of xenobiotic chemicals; Carcinogenesis; DNA damage, repair, and mutation; Immunotoxicity; Neurotoxicity; and modern toxicity testing strategies. These fundamental concepts in Mechanistic Toxicology will be integrated with examples of toxicants relevant to food, drugs and the environment.
LiteratureCasarett & Doull's Toxicology, The Basic Science of Poisons. Seventh Edition. Editor: Curtis D. Klaassen, 2008, McGraw-Hill. (available on-line)
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge of organic chemistry and biochemistry is required.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Personal CompetenciesCritical Thinkingassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection fostered
752-1300-01LFood Toxicology Information 3 credits1GS. J. Sturla, G. Aichinger
AbstractBuilds on a foundation in Toxicology fundamentals to address situations and toxins relevant to Food Science, Nutrition, and Food Safety & Quality.
ObjectiveCourse objectives are for the student to have a broad awareness of toxicant classes and toxicants relevant to food, and to know their identities (i.e. chemical structure or biological nature), origins, relevance of human exposures, general mode of biological action, and potential mitigation strategies.
ContentBuilds on a foundation in Toxicology fundamentals to address situations relevant to Food Science, Nutrition, and Food Safety & Quality. Representative topics: Toxic Phytochemicals and Mycotoxins, Industrial Contaminants and Packaging Materials, Toxicants formed During Food Processing, Alcohol and Tobacco. The class is comprised of bi-weekly lectures, independent reading, and preparation of an independent evaluation of a food-related toxin.
LiteratureReading from the primary literature will be referenced in class and posted to the course website.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course "Introduction to Toxicology" (752-1300-00V) is a prerequisite for the students who want to take this course. Equivalent course may be accepted; contact the instructor.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesfostered
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Self-presentation and Social Influence assessed
Personal CompetenciesCritical Thinkingassessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
752-6210-00LToxicology and Nutrition Laboratory Course Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisties:
Participation in the course Introduction to Nutritional Science (752-6001-00) and Introduction to Toxicology (752-1300-00) in parallel to the laboratory course.
3 credits4PI. Herter-Aeberli, S. J. Sturla, G. Aichinger, J. Rigutto
AbstractIntroduction to the analysis of pesticide residues in food, learning to assess cytotoxicity of a chemical in mammalian cells, monitoring the stability of DNA by UV spectrophotometry and synthesizing an antioxidant.
Introduction to anthropometric measurements and their interpretation, dietary assessment including analysis using nutritional software, assessment and interpretation of iron status.
Objective1) To gain practical insights into food monitoring by applying an LC-MS screening method and legal requirements for pesticides.
2) To learn details about mammalian cell cultures and practical training on the use of methods to measure cell viability.
3) To study the properties of a DNA duplex by melting the native structure while monitoring the transition with UV spectrophotometry.
4) To preform an organic chemistry reaction and recrystallization of an antioxidant and use UV spectrophotometry to assess the antioxidant capacity of structurally similar compounds.
5) To learn to assess and interpret anthropometric measurements, such as assessment of growth, fat-free mass and body fat
6) To gain insight into the concept of dietary assessment and to use one of the methods in an exercise and analyze and interpret the data using nutritional software
7) To understand the complexity of iron status measurement and the factors influencing its interpretation.
Content1) To gain practical insights into food monitoring by applying an LC-MS screening method and legal requirements for pesticides.
2) To learn details about mammalian cell cultures and practical training on the use of methods to measure cell viability.
3) To study the properties of a DNA duplex by melting the native structure while monitoring the transition with UV spectrophotometry.
4) To preform an organic chemistry reaction and recrystallization of an antioxidant and use UV spectrophotometry to assess the antioxidant capacity of structurally similar compounds.
5) To learn to assess and interpret anthropometric measurements, such as assessment of growth, fat-free mass and body fat
6) To gain insight into the concept of dietary assessment and to use one of the methods in an exercise and analyze and interpret the data using nutritional software
7) To understand the complexity of iron status measurement and the factors influencing its interpretation.
Lecture notesComplete course documenation will be provided.
LiteratureReferences will be indicated in the lab course material.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Project Managementfostered
Social CompetenciesCooperation and Teamworkfostered
766-6300-00LFundamentals of Food Toxicology Information Restricted registration - show details 3 credits1VS. J. Sturla
AbstractThe goals of the course will be for the student to be aware of chemical toxicants relevant to food and to know aspects of basic science regarding identities and origins, human exposures, and modes of toxicity.
ObjectiveLearning objectives are to connect structures and physical properties of chemicals from food with biochemical transformation processes; classify food toxicants on the basis of their relevant biochemical pathways of toxicity; describe the influence of food on the disposition of toxicants and quantify human exposures to toxicants from food; and evaluate toxicological risk assesments of chemicals from food and judge the toxicological basis of regulatory measures for food safety.
ContentBi-weekly lectures on topics such as mycotoxins, food packaging, food processing and additives, marine toxins, heavy metals, pesticide residues. Students are provided with resources for independent learning of Toxicology basics, participate in active learning sequences and presentations, and perform an independent, written evaluation of a food-related toxin.
LiteratureReading from the primary literature will be referenced in class and posted to the course website.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is restricted to MAS/CAS Nutrition Students.