Sean Willett: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2021

Name Prof. Dr. Sean Willett
FieldSedimentologie
Address
Geologisches Institut
ETH Zürich, NO E 33
Sonneggstrasse 5
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 69 51
E-mailswillett@erdw.ethz.ch
DepartmentEarth Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
402-0620-00LCurrent Topics in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Its Applicatons0 credits1SM. Christl, S. Willett
AbstractThe seminar is aimed at all students who, during their studies, are confronted with age determination methods based on long-living radionuclides found in nature. Basic methodology, the latest developments, and special examples from a wide range of applications will be discussed.
ObjectiveThe seminar provides the participants an overview about newest trends and developments of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and related applications. In their talks and subsequent discussions the participants learn intensively about the newest trends in the field of AMS thus attaining a broad knowledge on both, the physical principles and the applications of AMS, which goes far beyond the horizon of their own studies.
651-3001-00LDynamic Earth I6 credits4V + 2UO. Bachmann, A. Galli, A. Fichtner, M. Schönbächler, S. Willett
AbstractProvides a basic introduction into Earth Sciences, emphasizing different rock-types and the geological rock-cycle, as well as introduction into geophysics and plate tectonic theory.
ObjectiveUnderstanding basic geological and geophysical processes
ContentOverview of the Earth as a system, with emphasis on plate tectonic theory and the geological rock-cycle. Provides a basic introduction to crystals and minerals and different rock-types. Lectures include processes in the Earth's interior, physics of the earth, planetology, introduction to magmatic, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks. Excercises are conducted in small groups to provide more in depth understanding of concepts and content of the lectures.
Lecture noteswerden abgegeben.
LiteratureGrotzinger, J., Jordan, T.H., Press, F., Siever, R., 2007, Understanding Earth, W.H. Freeman & Co., New York, 5th Ed.
Press, F. Siever, R., Grotzinger, J. & Jordon, T.H., 2008, Allgemeine Geologie. Spektrum Akademischer Verlag, Heidelberg, 5.Auflage.
Prerequisites / NoticeExercises and short excursions in small groups (10-15 students) will be lead by student assistants. Specific topics in earth sciences will be discussed using examples and case studies. Hand samples of the major rock types will be described and interpreted. Short excursions in the region of Zurich will permit direct experience with earth science processes (e.g. earth surface processes) and recognition of earth science problems and solutions relevant for modern society (e.g. building materials, water resources). Working in small groups will allow for discussion and examination of actual earth science themes.
651-3521-00LTectonics3 credits2VW. Behr, S. Willett
AbstractComprehensive understanding of evolution, mechanics, and rheology of divergent, convergent and wrenching tectonic systems from the lithospheric scale to local shallow crustal and outcrop-scales. Evaluation of plate tectonic and other orogenic processes through the study of reference examples of taken in Alps-Himalaya orogenic system.
ObjectiveComprehensive understanding of evolution, mechanics, and rheology of divergent, convergent and wrenching tectonic systems from the lithospheric scale to local shallow crustal and outcrop-scales.
Assessment of mechanisms responsible for plate movements (the Earth as a heat transfer machine, dynamics of earth mantle, plate driving forces) and subsequent large-scale structures (oceanic basins and cycle of the oceanic lithosphere, convergence and mountain systems and continental growth, etc) through theoretical and experimental information.
Evaluation of plate tectonic and other orogenic processes through the study of reference examples of taken in Alps-Himalaya orogenic system.
ContentPlate tectonic frame work: earth cooling and mantle-plate interaction, three kinds of plate boundaries and their roles and characteristics, cycle of oceanic lithosphere, longlifety and growth of continents, supercontinents.
Rheology of layered lithosphere and upper mantle.
Obduction systems
Collisions systems
Extensional systems
Basin evolution
Passive and active continental margin evolution
LiteratureCondie, K. C. 1997. Plate tectonics and crustal evolution. Butterworth-Heinemann, Oxford.
Cox, A. & Hart, R. B. 1986. Plate tectonics. How it works. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford.
Dewey, J. F. 1977. Suture zone complexities: A review. Tectonophysics 40, 53-67.
Dewey, J. F., Pitman III, W. C., Ryan, W. B. F. & Bonin, J. 1973. Plate tectonics and the evolution of the Alpine system. Geological Society of America Bulletin 84, 3137-3180.
Kearey, P. & Vine, F. J. 1990. Global tectonics. Blackwell Scientific Publications, Oxford.
Park, R. G. 1993. Geological structures and moving plates. Chapman & Hall, Glasgow.
Turcotte, D. L. & Schubert, G. 2002. Geodynamics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Windley, B. F. 1995. The evolving continents. John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester.
651-4180-02LIntegrated Earth Systems II Restricted registration - show details 5 credits4G + 1UH. Stoll, D. Vance, S. Willett
AbstractThe surface Earth is often thought of as a set of interacting systems, often with feedbacks between them. These interacting systems control the tectonics, geomorphology, climate, and biology of the surface Earth. To fully understand the nature of the Earth System, including the controls on its past evolution, its present state, and its future, an integrated perspective is required.
ObjectiveTo introduce students to an integrated view of the surface Earth, uniting perspectives from different disciplines of the earth sciences.

To encourage students in the critical analysis of data and models in Earth Science.
ContentPlanet Earth has had a complex history since its formation ~4.6 billion years ago. The surface Earth is often thought of as a set of interacting systems, often with positive and negative feedbacks between them. These interacting systems control the tectonics, geomorphology, climate, and biology of the surface Earth. To fully understand the nature of the Earth System, including the controls on its past evolution, its present state, and its future, an integrated perspective is required. This is a subject that pulls in observations and models from many areas of the Earth Sciences, including geochemistry, geophysics, geology and biology. The main goal of the course is to convey this integrated view of the surface of our planet.

We will achieve this integrated view through a series of lectures, exercises, and tutorials. We take as our framework some of the key events in Earth history, encouraging understanding of the controlling processes through integrated observations, ideas and models from disciplines across science.
651-4341-00LSource to Sink Sedimentary Systems Restricted registration - show details 3 credits2GT. I. Eglinton, J. Hemingway, S. Willett
AbstractThe transfer and redistribution of mass and chemical elements at the Earth’s surface is controlled by a wide range of processes that will affect the magnitude and nature of fluxes exported from continental fluvial systems. This course addresses the production, transport, and deposition of sediments from source to sink and their interaction with biogeochemical cycles.
ObjectiveThis course aims at integrating different earth science disciplines (geomorphology, geochemistry, and tectonics) to gain a better understanding of the physical and biogeochemical processes at work across the sediment production, routing, and depositional systems. It will provide insight into how it is actually possible to “see a world in a grain of sand” by taking into account the cascade of physical and chemical processes that shaped and modified sediments and chemical elements from their source to their sink.
ContentLectures will introduce the main source to sink concepts and cover physical and biogeochemical processes in upland, sediment producing areas (glacial and periglacial processes; mass movements; hillslopes and soil processes/development; critical zone biogeochemical processes).

Field excursion (3 days, 8-10 October): will cover the upper Rhône from the Rhône glacier to the Rhône delta in Lake Geneva) as small scale source-to-sink system.

Practicals comprise (I) a small autonomous project on the Rhône catchment based on samples collected during the field trip and (II) an independent report on how you would design, build, and implement your own source-to-sink study.
Lecture notesLecture notes are provided online during the course. They summarize the current subjects week by week and provide the essential theoretical background.
LiteratureSuggested references :

- "Sediment routing systems: the fate of sediments from Source to Sink" by Philip A. Allen (Cambridge University Press)
- "Principles of soilscape and landscape evolution by Garry Willgoose" (Cambridge University Press)
- "Geomorphology, the mechanics and chemistry of landscapes" by Robert S. Anderson & Suzanne P. Anderson (Cambridge University Press)