Nicolas Gruber: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2023

Name Prof. Dr. Nicolas Gruber
FieldUmweltphysik
Address
I. f. Biogeochemie/Schadstoffdyn.
ETH Zürich, CHN E 31.2
Universitätstrasse 16
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 03 52
Fax+41 44 632 16 91
E-mailnicolas.gruber@env.ethz.ch
URLhttps://up.ethz.ch/people/person-detail.NDU4Mzg=.TGlzdC8xNzUxLC0zMDYxNTA1MjU=.html
DepartmentEnvironmental Systems Science
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
151-0928-00LCO2 Capture and Storage and the Industry of Carbon-Based Resources4 credits3GA. Bardow, V. Becattini, N. Gruber, M. Mazzotti, M. Repmann, T. Schmidt, D. Sutter
AbstractThis course introduces the fundamentals of carbon capture, utilization, and storage and related interdependencies between technosphere, ecosphere, and sociosphere. Topics covered: origin, production, processing, and economics of carbon-based resources; climate change in science & policies; CC(U)S systems; CO2 transport & storage; life-cycle assessment; net-zero emissions; CO2 removal options.
ObjectiveThe lecture aims to introduce carbon dioxide capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) systems, the technical solutions developed so far, and current research questions. This is done in the context of the origin, production, processing, and economics of carbon-based resources and of climate change issues. After this course, students are familiar with relevant technical and non-technical issues related to using carbon resources, climate change, and CCUS as a mitigation measure.

The class will be structured in 2 hours of lecture and one hour of exercises/discussion.
ContentThe transition to a net-zero society is associated with major challenges in all sectors, including energy, transportation, and industry. In the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 °C, rapid emission reduction and negative emission technologies are crucial to limiting global warming to below 1.5 °C. Therefore, this course illuminates carbon capture, utilization, and storage as a potential set of technologies for emission mitigation and for generating negative emissions.
Lecture notesLecture slides and supplementary documents will be available online.
LiteratureIPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, 2018.
http://www.ipcc.ch/report/sr15/

IPCC AR5 Climate Change 2014: Synthesis Report, 2014.
https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/syr/

IPCC AR6 Climate Change 2022: Mitigation of Climate Change, 2022.
https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sixth-assessment-report-working-group-3/

Global Status of CCS 2020. Published by the Global CCS Institute, 2020.
https://www.globalccsinstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Global-Status-of-CCS-Report-English.pdf
Prerequisites / NoticeExternal lecturers from the industry and other institutes will contribute with specialized lectures according to the schedule distributed at the beginning of the semester.
651-4095-01LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 1 Information Restricted registration - show details 1 credit1KH. Wernli, D. N. Bresch, M. Brunner, N. Gruber, H. Joos, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, C. Schär, S. Schemm, S. I. Seneviratne, M. Wild
AbstractThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
ObjectiveGet insight into ongoing research in different fields related to atmospheric and climate science
ContentThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please confirm your attendance of 8 colloquia per semester by using the form which is provided at the course webpage.
651-4095-02LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 2 Information Restricted registration - show details 1 credit1KH. Wernli, D. N. Bresch, M. Brunner, N. Gruber, H. Joos, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, C. Schär, S. Schemm, S. I. Seneviratne, M. Wild
AbstractThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
ObjectiveGet insight into ongoing research in different fields related to atmospheric and climate sciences
Prerequisites / NoticeTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please confirm your attendance of 8 colloquia per semester by using the form which is provided at the course webpage.
651-4095-03LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 3 Information Restricted registration - show details 1 credit1KH. Wernli, D. N. Bresch, M. Brunner, N. Gruber, H. Joos, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, C. Schär, S. Schemm, S. I. Seneviratne, M. Wild
AbstractThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
ObjectiveGet insight into ongoing research in different fields related to atmospheric and climate sciences
Prerequisites / NoticeTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please confirm your attendance of 8 colloquia per semester by using the form which is provided at the course webpage.
701-1302-00LTerm Paper 2: Seminar Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: Term Paper 1: Writing (701-1303-00L).
2 credits1SL. Winkel, M. Ackermann, N. Casacuberta Arola, K. Deiner, N. Gruber, R. Kipfer, R. Kretzschmar, K. McNeill, D. Mitrano, M. Müller, M. Sander, M. H. Schroth, C. Schubert
AbstractThis class is the 2nd part of a series and participation is conditional on the successful completion of "Term Paper 1: Writing". The results from the term paper written during the previous term are presented to the other students and advisors and discussed with the audience.
ObjectiveThe goal of the term paper seminars is to train the student's ability to communicate (scientific) results to a wider audience and the ability to respond to questions and comments.
ContentEach student presents the results of their term paper to fellow students and advisors and responds to questions and comments from the audience.
Lecture notesGuidelines and supplementary material are distributed on the Moodle platform.
Prerequisites / NoticeThere is no final exam. Grade is assigned based on the quality of the presentation and ensuing discussion.

To obtain the credits, it is mandatory to attend at least 60% of all seminar dates offered in the fall and spring semester. Active participation in discussion and feedback rounds is expected.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesfostered
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesfostered
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingfostered
Critical Thinkingassessed
701-1303-00LTerm Paper 1: Writing Restricted registration - show details 5 credits6AL. Winkel, M. Ackermann, N. Casacuberta Arola, K. Deiner, N. Gruber, R. Kipfer, R. Kretzschmar, K. McNeill, D. Mitrano, M. Müller, M. Sander, M. H. Schroth, C. Schubert
AbstractThe ability to critically evaluate original (scientific) literature and to summarise the information in a succinct manner is an important skill for any student. This course aims to practice this ability, requiring each student to write a term paper of scientific quality on a topic of relevance for research in the areas of biogeochemistry and pollutant dynamics.
ObjectiveThe goal of the term paper is to train the student's ability to critically evaluate scientific literature and to summarise the findings concisely in a paper addressing a research question.

At the end of the course, students will be able to:
- narrow down a research question.
- identify relevant literature to address the research question.
- concisely summarise and critically evaluate their findings.
- formulate key outstanding questions.
ContentEach student is expected to write a paper with a length of approximately 15-20 pages. The students can choose from a list of topics prepared by the tutors, but the final topic will be determined based on a balance of choice and availability. The students will be guided and advised by their tutors throughout the course.

The paper itself should contain the following elements:
- Motivation and context of the given topic (25%)
- Concise presentation and critical evaluation of the state of the science (50%)
- Identification of open questions and perhaps outline of opportunities for research (25%)

In addition, the accurate use of citations, attribution of ideas, and the judicious use of figures, tables, equations and references are critical components of a successful paper. Specialised knowledge is not expected, nor required; neither is new research.
Lecture notesGuidelines and supplementary material are distributed on the Moodle platform.
LiteratureOriginal scientific literature will be identified based on the chosen topic.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe term paper course is primarily aimed at master students majoring in biogeochemistry & pollutant dynamics and ISTP students with a solid background in natural sciences and a strong interest in biogeochemistry & pollutant dynamics.

Each students submits a term paper that will be reviewed by one fellow student and one faculty. The submission of the term paper and a written review of another student's term paper are a condition for obtaining the credit points.

There is no final exam. Grade is assigned based on the quality of the term paper and the submitted review as well as on the presentation in the following term.

Results from the term paper will be presented to fellow students and involved faculty in the following semester ("Term Paper 2: Seminar").
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesfostered
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Personal CompetenciesCritical Thinkingassessed
Self-direction and Self-management fostered
701-1317-00LGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles and Climate3 credits3GN. Gruber, M. Vogt
AbstractThe human-induced emissions of carbon dioxide has led to atmospheric CO2 concentrations that Earth likely has no’t seen for the last 30 million years. This course aims to investigate and understand the impact of humans on Earth's biogeochemical cycles with a focus on the carbon cycle and its interaction with the physical climate system for the past, the present, and the future.
ObjectiveThis course aims to investigate the nature of the interaction between the carbon cycles on land and in the ocean with climate and how this interaction has evolved over time and will change in the future. Students are expected to participate actively in the course, which includes the critical reading of the pertinent literature.
ContentTopics discussed include: The anthropogenic perturbation of the global carbon cycle and climate. Response of land and oceanic ecosystems to past and future global changes; Interactions between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean; Biogeochemical processes controlling carbon dioxide and oxygen in the ocean and atmosphere on time-scales from a few years to a few hundred thousand years.
Lecture notesSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press.
Additional handouts will be provided as needed. see website: http://www.up.ethz.ch/education/biogeochem_cycles
LiteratureSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press, 526pp.

Original literature.
743-0001-00LCAS in Climate Innovation Restricted registration - show details 10 credits11GC. Rapo, D. N. Bresch, N. Gruber
AbstractWorking with real-​world case studies, the Climate Innovation programme empowers climate leaders with the necessary skills and knowledge to support and lead the transition towards net zero emissions.
ObjectiveMitigation of and adaptation to climate change requires fast and deeply transformative changes of our socio-​economic-environmental systems towards net zero emissions.
The goal of the Climate Innovation programme is to equip future climate leaders with the adequate skills and knowledge to 1) lead this transition, 2) navigate uncertainty and complexity, and 3) develop impactful solutions in interdisciplinary teams.
A collective intelligence will be created around three pillars of this programme, namely system knowledge, transformational learning experience, and network activation, with an emphasis on dialogue and exchange.
Prerequisites / NoticeMaster's degree acknowledged by ETH or equivalent educational qualifications, preferably in science or humanities, with a background in natural sciences, engineering, architecture or business.
The Climate Innovation programme is aimed at professionals (3 years +) from business, industry, the public sector and non-governmental organisations who deal with complex problems related to climate change.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesfostered
Techniques and Technologiesfostered
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesfostered
Problem-solvingassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Leadership and Responsibilityassessed
Personal CompetenciesCritical Thinkingfostered
Self-awareness and Self-reflection assessed
851-0178-00LEthics and Scientific Integrity for Doctoral Students Restricted registration - show details
This course is interdisciplinary and open for all.
Please check whether your department or doctoral school offers this course. If so, we suggest that you enrol there.
1 credit2UE. Bobst, G. Achermann, N. Gruber, E. Vayena
AbstractThis course sensitises doctoral students to ethical issues that may occur during their doctorate. After an introduction to ethics and good scientific practice, students are familiarised with resources that can assist them with ethical decision-making. Students get the chance to apply their knowledge in a discipline specific context.
ObjectiveDoctoral students learn how to identify, analyse and address ethical issues in their own scientific research. In addition, they will reflect on their professional role as scientific researchers.
ContentThis course introduces doctoral students to ethical issues that may occur during their research activities. After an introduction to ethics and good scientific practice, participants are familiarised with resources that can assist them with ethical decision-​making (e-​learning module on Moodle). In the second, face-​fo-face part, participants will have the opportunity to critically discuss their knowledge and share their experiences with fellow doctoral students in a discipline specific context.

The first part is a self-paced e-learning module. The second part provides an interactive learning environment face-to-face.
Prerequisites / NoticeFor doctoral students only
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesDecision-makingassessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Personal CompetenciesCritical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed