Momoyo Kaijima: Katalogdaten im Herbstsemester 2019

NameFrau Prof. Momoyo Kaijima
LehrgebietArchitectural Behaviorology
Adresse
Architectural Behaviorology
ETH Zürich, ONA G 34
Neunbrunnenstr. 50
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
E-Mailkaijima@arch.ethz.ch
URLhttps://kaijima.arch.ethz.ch/?post_type=news
DepartementArchitektur
BeziehungOrdentliche Professorin

NummerTitelECTSUmfangDozierende
052-1115-19LArchitectural Design V-IX: Fishery Behaviorology in Japan - Designing Urban Rural Commons (Kaijima) Information Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Please register (Link) only after the internal enrolment for the design classes (see Link).

Project grading at semester end is based on the list of enrolments on 5.11.19, 24:00 h (valuation date) only.

Ultimate deadline to unsubscribe or enroll for the studio is 5.11.19, 24:00 h.
14 KP16UM. Kaijima
KurzbeschreibungThis year, through the lens of Architectural Behaviorology, we focus on designing architecture for new livelihoods integrated with fishery, aiming to design Urban Rural Commons. Our field of study in the autumn semester will be in Ishinomaki, Japan. Students will propose an architectural project to intervene the network and establish Urban Rural Commons, for a better future of Ishinomaki.
LernzielArchitectural Behaviorology
The development of modern technology and industry in the 20th century has constructed a barrier between our everyday life and local resources such as nature, human skills, and their knowledge. Architectural Behaviorology is our architectural design method which focuses on creating a better accessibility to such resources. Our objective is to cultivate these resources in order to rediscover their forgotten potential through the lens of ethnographical network, and activate them by proposing an architectural design. The program under the Chair of Architectural Behaviorology focuses on 6 themes along 6 years: 'Window Behaviorology' 'Genealogy of Architectural Typology' 'Actor Network of Timber Construction' 'Urban-Rural Exchange' 'Urban Hybrid' 'Urban Commons,' developing one theme both in Japan and in Switzerland/Europe each year.

Understanding of Architectural Behaviorology concept
Learning research method
Learning design method integrated research theme
Learning visualization method by actor net-work mapping, model, Sectional drawing
Learning structure and material
InhaltDesign Studio 2019AS
Fishery Behaviorology in Japan
- Designing Urban Rural Commons-
This year, through the lens of Architectural Behaviorology, we focus on designing architecture for new livelihoods integrated with fishery, aiming to design Urban Rural Commons. Small rural communities engaged in fishery have been important not only for national food supply but also for sustainable ecosystem of human and nature. However, they struggle to find next generations today, and their traditional fisherman village-scapes and skills/crafts integrated with local nature/culture were expelled by more industrialized and centralized fisheries.
Our field of study in the autumn semester will be in Ishinomaki, where the local fishermen have benefited from one of the world’s three best fishing grounds as a mixed current of Oyashio and Kuroshio. However, attacked by Tsunami Triple Disaster in 2011, small villages and town communities in Ishinomaki had to redefine their new lives with dramatically decreased populations. 8 years after, the communities start to envision more sustainable ways of living, while regaining the production little by little.
The term Urban Rural Commons is defined as a notion of commons incorporating both rural/urban commons, as well as integrating the interaction / hybridization of them. Students will examine the existing actor network of the livelihood with fishery, visualizing them by actor network drawings with an ethnographical approach. Then, through drawings and models, the students will propose an architectural project to intervene the network and establish Urban Rural Commons, for a better future of Ishinomaki.

Students choosing design class Kaijima in priority 1 during internal enrollment do not choose a seminar week in AS 2019. Trip to Japan during seminar week is highly recommended and will be credited as seminar week by Chair Kaijima.

Seminar Week 2019AS
Fishery Behaviorology in Japan
- Designing Urban Rural Commons

In the autumn semester 2019, Studio Kaijima offers a week-long trip to investigate the theme of Fishery Behaviorology in Japan. We will visit cities and villages in Japan (in the regions of Chiba, Ibaraki, Saitama, Kanagawa, and Miyagi), chosen for their unique contexts of architecture/villages related to the livelihood with old/new fishery industry and its local contexts. Field works, lectures by specialists, visits to traditional villages and selected architectures, along with the actual fishing experiences, will deepen the knowledge on the theme. We will also visit several contemporary projects in order to understand how new kinds of architectural design can contribute to create Urban Rural Commons.
The trip will be an integral part of the design studio, giving the students an opportunity to visit the site and to experience its broader context. The students will investigate the interaction between architectural elements, townscape and people’s lives, as well as understand cultural and historical implications, all of which would be essential insights for their projects.

Professor:Momoyo Kaijima
Advisor: Yoshiharu Tsukamoto
Assistants:Tamotsu Ito, Simona Ferrari
Lauguage:English
Seminarweek Trip dates:October 18th(night) – October 27th, 2019
Cost category: C
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesStudents choosing design class Kaijima in priority 1 during internal enrollment do not choose a seminar week in AS 2019. Trip to Japan during seminar week is highly recommended and will be credited as seminar week by Chair Kaijima.
851-0252-60LFuture Learning Spaces: HIL Workshop for Non Architects Belegung eingeschränkt - Details anzeigen
Workshop for non-architects. Architects register for a "Vertiefungsarbeit” at the Chair of Momoyo Kaijima.

Number of participants limited to 10.

Application: Please apply until August 31, 2019, by sending an email to Link with a motivation letter (1 page)
3 KP5SB. Emo Nax, M. Kaijima
KurzbeschreibungThis course is for D-ARCH students taking the Informal Learning Spaces Design Studio. Students develop their studio project to gain a better understanding of how users behave in that space. Supported by a theoretical foundation in spatial cognition, students observe, analyse and document how their case study is used by others.
LernzielThe aim of the seminar is for students to engage with what makes a good learning space. Students develop the intervention proposed in the design studio. By observing and documenting how other students interact with their interventions, students will be able to answer questions about what makes a good learning space for ETH students.
InhaltWhat makes a good learning space? How does this differ for students from different disciplines? This interdisciplinary seminar addresses the design of learning spaces by combining methods from architecture and psychology.

Students are taught formal methods of behavioural observation so that they can observe and analyse how their intervention is used by others (students, faculty, visitors) over time. By collecting behavioural data on how their intervention is used, students will be able to assess the impact of their design on other users. The seminar encourages students to critically reflect on what elements are necessary for designing the learning spaces of the future.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesAccess to the course is restricted to D-ARCH students of the Informal Learning Spaces Design Studio.