Frank Schimmelfennig: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2023

Award: The Golden Owl
Name Prof. Dr. Frank Schimmelfennig
FieldEuropäische Politik
Address
Professur für Europäische Politik
ETH Zürich, IFW D 45.1
Haldeneggsteig 4
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 80 62
Fax+41 44 632 12 89
E-mailfrank.schimmelfennig@eup.gess.ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
853-0048-00LInternational Politics: Theory and Methods (with Tutorat) Restricted registration - show details 4 credits3G + 1UF. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThe course covers the main theories (realism, institutionalism, liberalism, transnationalism and constructivism) as well as core problems of international politics such as war, peace, international cooperation and integration. The lectures are accompanied by a tutorial with case studies.
ObjectiveFirst, the course seeks to generate a better understanding of the central and specific problems of politics in the international realm, which result from the absence of centralized rule enforcement ("anarchy") . In addition, participants become familiar with the main theories of International Relations and the mechanisms and conditions these identify for solving international problems of security and cooperation. Case studies on areas and issues of international politics provide an overview of current international developments and an exemplary application of IR theory.
Content1. The subject-matter and problems of international politics

Theories
2. Power and Balance: Realism
3. Problem structures and negotiations in international politics
4. Interdependence and Institutions: Institutionalism and Transnationalism
5. Democracy and Society: Liberalism
6. Identity and Community: Constructivism

Issue Areas and Relationships
7. War: New Wars
8. Peace: The "long" and the "democratic" peace
9. Security cooperation: the new NATO
10. Economic cooperation: the world trade order
11. Human rights cooperation: global and regional human rights regimes
12. Environmental cooperation: ozone depletion and climate change
13. Legitimacy and democracy in global governance
Lecture notesSchimmelfennig, Frank: Internationale Politik. Paderborn: Schöningh Verlag, 6. Auflage, 2021.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Personal CompetenciesCritical Thinkingassessed
853-0048-01LInternational Politics: Theory and Methods3 credits3GF. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThe course covers the main theories (realism, institutionalism, liberalism, transnationalism and constructivism) as well as core problems of international politics such as war, peace, international cooperation and integration.
ObjectiveFirst, the course seeks to generate a better understanding of the central and specific problems of politics in the international realm, which result from the absence of centralized rule enforcement ("anarchy") . In addition, participants become familiar with the main theories of International Relations and the mechanisms and conditions these identify for solving international problems of security and cooperation. Case studies on areas and issues of international politics provide an overview of current international developments and an exemplary application of IR theory.
Content1. The subject-matter and problems of international politics

Theories
2. Power and Balance: Realism
3. Problem structures and negotiations in international politics
4. Interdependence and Institutions: Institutionalism and Transnationalism
5. Democracy and Society: Liberalism
6. Identity and Community: Constructivism

Issue Areas and Relationships
7. War: New Wars
8. Peace: The "long" and the "democratic" peace
9. Security cooperation: the new NATO
10. Economic cooperation: the world trade order
11. Human rights cooperation: global and regional human rights regimes
12. Environmental cooperation: ozone depletion and climate change
13. Legitimacy and democracy in global governance
Lecture notesSchimmelfennig, Frank: Internationale Politik. Paderborn: Schöningh Verlag, 6. Auflage, 2021.
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Personal CompetenciesCritical Thinkingassessed
857-0051-00LComparative and EU Politics Restricted registration - show details 8 credits2SF. Schimmelfennig, C. Freudlsperger
AbstractThis advanced research seminar deals with current issues and research in comparative politics and EU integration and politics.
ObjectiveThis seminar is designed for advanced students of political science with an interest in comparative European politics and EU integration and politics. It introduces students to state-of-the-art theorizing, data, methods, and empirical findings and provides them with opportunities to work with data on their own. After taking this seminar, students should have a good overview of current research and be prepared to write their Master's thesis in this area. Topics include: European integration, EU decision-making, parliaments in the EU and its member states, party groups and parliamentarians. Students may also propose research topics of their interest.
860-0001-00LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 27.

Priority for Science, Technology, and Policy Master.
3 credits2GT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractStudents acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard.
ObjectivePublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
Lecture notesCourse materials can be found on Moodle.
LiteratureReadings can be found on Moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a Master level course. The course is capped at 27 students, with ISTP Master students having priority.
860-0001-01LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes; Research Paper Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: you have to be enrolled in 860-0001-00L during the same semester.
3 credits3AT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThis is an add-on module to the course: 860-0001-00L. It focuses on students writing an essay on an issue covered by the main course 860-0001-00L.
ObjectiveStudents learn how to write an essay on a policy issue they select.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies - hence this course is complementary to the ISTP course on concepts and methods of policy analysis. Students learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (taught by Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (taught by Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (taught by Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organizations. This teaching unit is an add-on module to the course: 860-0001-00L. It focuses on students writing an essay on an issue covered by the main course 860-0001-00L.
LiteratureSee Moodle
Prerequisites / NoticeAccess only for ISTP MSc students also enrolled in 860-0001-00L
CompetenciesCompetencies
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingfostered
877-0101-00LTechnology, Society, Markets and the State Restricted registration - show details 6 credits5GT. Schmidt, T. Bernauer, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractTechnological innovation is seldom entirely market-driven but often requires policy intervention. This module will introduce the participants into the literature that aims to understand technology and the underlying markets and its interaction with policy and its underlying politics. Besides an academic perspective, it will introduce practitioners working at the technology-policy interface.
ObjectiveIntroduction:
Participants understand (1) what public policy and policy analysis are, (2) why policy analysis is important for evidence-based policy-making, (3) how policy analysis is undertaken in a consulting firm, and (4) they learn from each other for which current professional challenges policy analysis will be useful.
Technology, Society, Markets, and the State:
Participants understand (1) what the key technological innovations in history have been, (2) how technological innovation unfolds and what factors drive it or slow it down, (3) what role the state (public policy, regulatory frameworks), markets (consumers, firms), and other stakeholders play in this regard.
Political Institutions and Policy-Making Processes:
Understand (1) how electoral systems, legislatures, government, public administrations, the judiciary, and interest groups function and shape policy choices, (2) the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies, (3) how the European Union and international organisations decide on and implement policies.
LiteratureCourse materials can be found on Moodle.