Samuel C. Zeeman: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Name Prof. Dr. Samuel C. Zeeman
FieldPlant Biochemistry
Address
Professur für Pflanzenbiochemie
ETH Zürich, LFW E 53.1
Universitätstrasse 2
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 82 75
E-mailsamuel.zeeman@biol.ethz.ch
DepartmentBiology
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
551-0120-00LPlant Biology Colloquium I
Only compulsory for Master students who started their Master in autumn 2017 or later.

This compulsory course is required only once. It may be taken in autumn as course 551-0120-00 "Plant Biology Colloquium I" or in spring as course 551-0120-01 "Plant Biology Colloquium II".
2 credits1KC. Sánchez-Rodríguez, W. Gruissem, A. Rodriguez-Villalon, O. Voinnet, S. C. Zeeman
AbstractCurrent topics in Molecular Plant Biology presented by internal and external speakers from accademia.
ObjectiveGetting insight into actual areas and challenges of Molecular Plant Biology.
Contenthttp://www.impb.ethz.ch/news-and-events/colloquium-impb.html
551-0311-00LMolecular Life of Plants Information 6 credits4VW. Gruissem, A. Rodriguez-Villalon, C. Sánchez-Rodríguez, O. Voinnet, S. C. Zeeman
AbstractThe advanced course introduces students to plants through a concept-based discussion of developmental processes that integrates physiology and biochemistry with genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. The course follows the life of the plant, starting with the seed, progressing through germination to the seedling and mature plant, and ending with reproduction and senescence.
ObjectiveThe new course "Molecular Life of Plants" reflects the rapid advcances that are occurring in the field of experimental plant biology as well as the changing interests of students being trained in this discipline. Contemporary plant biology courses emphasize a traditional approach to experimental plant biology by discussing discrete topics that are removed from the context of the plant life cycle. The course will take an integrative approach that focuses on developmental concepts. Whereas traditional plant physiology courses were based on research carried out on intact plants or plant organs and were often based on phenomenological observations, current research in plant biology emphasizes work at the cellular, subcellular and molecular levels.

The goal of "Molecular Life of Plants" is to train students in integrative approaches to understand the function of plants in a developmental context. While the course focuses on plants, the training integrative approaches will also be useful for other organisms.
ContentThe course "Molecular Life of Plants" will cover the following topics in a developmental context:

Plant genome organization
Seed anatomy
Food reserves and mobilization
Seedling emergence
Heterotrophic to autotrophic growth
Chlorophyll biosynthesis, photoreceptors
Integration of metabolism
Hormones
Cell cycle
Cell differentiation and expansion
Environmental interactions—abiotic
Environmental interactions—biotic
Flower development and fertilization
Embryo and seed development
Fruit development
Senescence
551-0359-00LPlant Biochemistry Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
6 credits7GS. C. Zeeman, B. Pfister
AbstractIn this block course, students actively participate in ongoing research projects on plant metabolism and are tutored individually by doctoral students and postdocs. In a lecture series, the theoretical background of the projects and their interrelationship is provided. Finally, students discuss their projects and results during a poster session.
ObjectiveIn this block course, students actively participate in ongoing research projects on plant metabolism and are tutored individually by doctoral students and postdocs.
ContentParticipation in the following research projects will be possible: Photosynthetic metabolism; how is photo-assimilated carbon allocated to sustain plant growth? Chloroplast biology; how is chloroplast function integrated with that to the whole cell? Starch biosynthesis and degradation; how are complex, semi-crystalline starch granules made from simple sugars, and once made, how are they degraded again to release the stored carbohydrate? Regulation of metabolism through protein-protein interaction; how and why do proteins involved in starch metabolism interact with each other to form multi-subunit enzymes and multi-enzyme complexes? Sugar sensing; How does a plant know how much sugar it has, and how does this influence development.
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureDescriptions of the possible projects including individual reading assignments will be handed out beforehand.