Samuel C. Zeeman: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2022

Name Prof. Dr. Samuel C. Zeeman
FieldPlant Biochemistry
Address
Professur für Pflanzenbiochemie
ETH Zürich, LFW E 53.1
Universitätstrasse 2
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 82 75
E-mailsamuel.zeeman@biol.ethz.ch
DepartmentBiology
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
551-0120-00LPlant Biology Colloquium (Autumn Semester)
This compulsory course is required only once. It may be taken in autumn as course 551-0120-00 "Plant Biology Colloquium (Autumn Semester)" or in spring as course 551-0120-01 "Plant Biology Colloquium (Spring Semester)".
2 credits1KS. C. Zeeman, K. Bomblies, C. Sánchez-Rodríguez, O. Voinnet
AbstractCurrent topics in Molecular Plant Biology presented by internal and external speakers from accademia.
ObjectiveGetting insight into actual areas and challenges of Molecular Plant Biology.
Contenthttp://www.impb.ethz.ch/news-and-events/colloquium-impb.html
551-0127-00LFundamentals of Biology III: Multicellularity8 credits6GM. Stoffel, M. Künzler, O. Y. Martin, U. Suter, S. Werner, A. Wutz, S. C. Zeeman
AbstractThe lecture conveys the fundamental concepts underlying multicellularity with an emphasis on the molecular basis of multicellular biological systems and their functional integration into coherent wholes. The structural and functional specialization in multicellular organisms will be discussed by highlighting common and specific functions in fungi, plants, and animals (including humans).
Objective1.Students can describe advantages and challenges associated with being multicellular and outline independent solutions that organisms have developed to cope with the challenges of complex multicellularity
.
2.Students can explain how the internal and external structures of fungi, plants and animals function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

3.Students can explain the basic pathways and mechanisms of cellular communication regulating cellular behavior (cell adhesion, metabolism, proliferation, reproduction, development).

4.Students can describe how a single cell develops from one cell into many, each with different specialized functions.
ContentThe lecture introduces the structural and functional specialization in fungi, plants and animals, including humans. After providing an overview on the diversity of eukaryotic organisms, the lecture will discuss how fungi, plants, animals and humans have evolved structures and strategies to cope with the challenges of multicellularity. The molecular basis underlying communication, coordination and differentiation will be conveyed and complemented by key aspects of reproduction, metabolism development, and regeneration. Topics include form and function of fungi and plants, human anatomy and physiology, metabolism, cell signaling, adhesion, stem cells, regeneration, reproduction, and development.
LiteratureAlberts et al. 'Molecular Biology of the Cell' 6th edition
Smith A.M., et al. “Plant Biology” Garland Science, New York, Oxford
Campbell “Biology”, 11th Edition
Prerequisites / NoticeSome lecture are held in English.
551-0127-01LPlants and Fungi4 credits3GS. C. Zeeman, M. Künzler, O. Y. Martin
AbstractThe lecture conveys the fundamental concepts underlying multicellularity with an emphasis on the molecular basis of multicellular biological systems and their functional integration into coherent wholes. The structural and functional specialization in multicellular organisms will be discussed by highlighting common and specific functions in fungi and plant.s
Objective1.Students can describe advantages and challenges associated with being multicellular and outline independent solutions that organisms have developed to cope with the challenges of complex multicellularity
.
2.Students can explain how the internal and external structures of fungi and plants function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

3.Students can explain the basic pathways and mechanisms of cellular communication regulating cellular behavior (cell adhesion, metabolism, proliferation, reproduction, development).

4.Students can describe how a single cell develops from one cell into many, each with different specialized functions.
ContentThe lecture introduces the structural and functional specialization in fungi and plants. After providing an overview on the diversity of eukaryotic organisms, the lecture will discuss how fungi and plants have evolved structures and strategies to cope with the challenges of multicellularity. The molecular basis underlying communication, coordination and differentiation will be conveyed and complemented by key aspects of reproduction, metabolism development, and regeneration. Topics include form and function of fungi and plants, metabolism, cell signaling, adhesion, stem cells, regeneration, reproduction, and development.
LiteratureAlberts et al. 'Molecular Biology of the Cell' 6th edition
Smith A.M., et al. “Plant Biology” Garland Science, New York, Oxford
Campbell “Biology”, 11th Edition
Prerequisites / NoticeSome lecture are held in English.
551-0205-00LChallenges in Plant Sciences Information
Number of participants limited to 40.
2 credits2KS. C. Zeeman, S. Mintchev, M. Paschke, B. Pfister, further lecturers
AbstractThe colloquium “Challenges in Plant Sciences” is a core class of the Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center's PhD program and the MSc module. The colloquium introduces participants to the broad spectrum of plant sciences within the network. The course offers the opportunity to approach interdisciplinary topics in the field of plant sciences.
ObjectiveObjectives of the colloquium are:

Introduction to resecent research in all fields of plant sciences
Working in interdisciplinary teams on the topics
Developing presentation and discussion skills
ContentThe topics encompass integrated knowledge on current plant research, ranging from the molecular level to the ecosystem level, and from basic to applied science while making use of the synergies between the different research groups within the PSC.
More information on the content: https://www.plantsciences.uzh.ch/en/teaching/masters/colloquium.html
CompetenciesCompetencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationassessed
Cooperation and Teamworkfostered
Personal CompetenciesSelf-direction and Self-management fostered
551-0311-00LMolecular Life of Plants6 credits4VS. C. Zeeman, K. Bomblies, O. Voinnet
AbstractThe advanced course introduces students to plants through a concept-based discussion of developmental processes that integrates physiology and biochemistry with genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. The course follows the life of the plant, starting with the seed, progressing through germination to the seedling and mature plant, and ending with reproduction and senescence.
ObjectiveThe new course "Molecular Life of Plants" reflects the rapid advcances that are occurring in the field of experimental plant biology as well as the changing interests of students being trained in this discipline. Contemporary plant biology courses emphasize a traditional approach to experimental plant biology by discussing discrete topics that are removed from the context of the plant life cycle. The course will take an integrative approach that focuses on developmental concepts. Whereas traditional plant physiology courses were based on research carried out on intact plants or plant organs and were often based on phenomenological observations, current research in plant biology emphasizes work at the cellular, subcellular and molecular levels.

The goal of "Molecular Life of Plants" is to train students in integrative approaches to understand the function of plants in a developmental context. While the course focuses on plants, the training integrative approaches will also be useful for other organisms.
ContentThe course "Molecular Life of Plants" will cover the following topics:

Plant genome organization and evolution
Plant functional genomics and systems biology
Plant genome engineering and editing
Seed development and embryogenesis
Root apical meristem: structure, function and hormone regulation
Shoot apical meristem: structure, function and hormone regulation
Mobilization of seed reserves
Heterotrophic to autotrophic growth
Chloroplast biogenesis and light perception
Photosynthetic and central carbon metabolism
Integration of carbon and nitrogen metabolism
Principles of RNA silencing
MicroRNAs: discovery and modes of action
RNA silencing and pathogen defense
RNA silencing movement, amplification and trans-generational silencing
Plants and the environment
Plant-pathogen interactions: pathogen attack, first layers of plant defense and plant responses
Senescence
551-0351-00LMembrane Biology Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.
The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
6 credits7PV. Korkhov, U. Kutay, S. C. Zeeman
AbstractThe course will introduce the students to the key concepts in membrane biology and will allow them to be involved in laboratory projects related to that broad field. The course will consist of lectures, literature discussions, and practical laboratory work in small groups. Results of the practical projects will be presented during the poster session at the end of the course.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to expose the students to a wide range of modern research areas encompassed by the field of membrane biology.
ContentStudents will be engaged in research projects aimed at understanding the biological membranes at the molecular, organellar and cellular levels. Students will design and perform experiments, evaluate experimental results, analyze the current scientific literature and understand the relevance of their work in the context of the current state of the membrane biology field.
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureThe recommended literature, including reviews and primary research articles, will be provided during the course
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be taught in English. All general lectures will be held at ETH Hoenggerberg. Students will be divided into small groups to carry out experiments at ETH or at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Travel to the Paul Scherrer Institute will be by public transportation.
551-0359-00LPlant Biochemistry Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 11.
The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
6 credits7PS. C. Zeeman, B. Pfister
AbstractIn this block course, students actively participate in ongoing research projects on plant metabolism and are tutored by doctoral students and postdocs. The theoretical background of the projects is provided in a lecture series. Finally, students discuss their projects and results during an interactive poster session.
ObjectiveThrough supervision in small groups (either individually or in groups of two) students learn to conduct experiments in molecular plant biology, interpret the results, record them and communicate them to peers. Students also gain an insight into the larger context of their projects and how they are planned in the longer term.
ContentParticipation in a project from the following list is possible: 1) Photosynthesis: How is photosynthesis regulated and how is photoassimilated carbon distributed in plants? 2) Biology of chloroplasts: How do chloroplasts develop and how is their function coordinated with that of the whole cell? 3) Starch biosynthesis and degradation: How are complex, semi-crystalline starch granules produced from monosaccharides and how are they broken down again to release energy?
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureDescriptions of the possible projects including individual reading suggestions will be handed out beforehand.