Ralph Spolenak: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Award: The Golden Owl
Name Prof. Dr. Ralph Spolenak
FieldNanometallurgy
Address
Institut für Metallforschung
ETH Zürich, HCI G 511
Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1-5/10
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 25 90
Fax+41 44 632 11 01
E-mailralph.spolenak@mat.ethz.ch
URLhttps://met.mat.ethz.ch/
DepartmentMaterials
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
165-0100-00LManufacturing Processes Information Restricted registration - show details
Only for CAS in Applied Manufacturing Technology and MAS in Applied Technology.
3 credits2GR. Spolenak
AbstractThe module discusses the most important manufacturing processes and technologies driving Industry 4.0, including both traditional and advanced manufacturing. The course will cover a wide variety of modern forming, shaping and joining techniques. Further, it will introduce advanced technology such as non-conventional machining, micromanufacturing and additive manufacturing.
ObjectiveThe module will reveal the fundamental link between materials properties and processing, and will thus provide a basis for the discussion of product design considerations from the viewpoint of manufacturing processes.
165-0103-00LMaterials Information Restricted registration - show details
Only for CAS in Applied Manufacturing Technology and MAS in Applied Technology.
3 credits2GR. Spolenak
AbstractThis module provides fundamental training in the behavior and manufacturing properties of materials as well as an introduction to materials selection and design considerations as practiced in industry, including related concepts such as Design for Manufacturing and “green” design.
Objective• to understand the societal implications of materials development
• to appreciate the challenges in materials selection
• to follow the economical aspect of process selection
• to grasp that any material is much more than its chemical composition
327-0501-AALMetals I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RR. Spolenak
AbstractRepetition and advancement of dislocation theory. Mechanical properties of metals: hardening mechanisms, high temperature plasticity, alloying effects. Case studies in alloying to illustrate the mechanisms.
ObjectiveRepetition and advancement of dislocation theory. Mechanical properties of metals: hardening mechanisms, high temperature plasticity, alloying effects. Case studies in alloying to illustrate the mechanisms.
ContentDislocation theory:
Properties of dislocations, motion and kinetics of dislocations, dislocation-dislocation and dislocation-boundary interactions, consequences of partial dislocations, sessile dislocations
Hardening theory:
a. solid solution hardening: case studies in copper-nickel and iron-carbon alloys
b. particle hardening: case studies on aluminium-copper alloys
High temperature plasticity:
thermally activated glide
power-law creep
diffusional creep: Coble, Nabarro-Herring
deformation mechanism maps
Case studies in turbine blades
superplasticity
alloying effects
Lecture noteshttps://www.met.mat.ethz.ch/education/lect_scripts
LiteratureHull/Bacon, Introduction to Dislocations, Butterworth & Heinemann
Courtney, Mechanical Behaviour of Materials, McGraw-Hill
Porter/Easterling, Transformations in Metals and Alloys, Chapman & Hall
327-0612-AALMetals II
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RR. Spolenak, M. Schinhammer, A. Wahlen
AbstractIntroduction to materials selection. Basic knowledge of major metallic materials: aluminium, magnesium, titanium, copper, iron and steel. Selected topics in high temperature materials: nickel and iron-base superalloys, intermetallics and refractory metals.
ObjectiveIntroduction to materials selection. Basic knowledge of major metallic materials: aluminium, magnesium, titanium, copper, iron and steel. Selected topics in high temperature materials: nickel and iron-base superalloys, intermetallics and refractory metals.
ContentThis course is devided into five parts:

A. Materials selection
Principles of materials properties maps
Introduction to the 'Materials selector' software package
Case studies

B. Light metals and alloys
Aluminium, magnesium, titanium
Properties and hardening mechanisms
Case studies in technological applications

C. Copper and its alloys

D. Iron and steel
The seven pros for steel
Fine grained steels, heat resistant steels
Steel and corrosion phenomena
Selection and application

E. High temperature alloys
Superalloys: iron, nickel, cobalt
Intermetallics: properties and application
Lecture noteshttp://www.met.mat.ethz.ch/education/lect_scripts
LiteratureAshby/Jones, Engineering Materials 1 & 2, Pergamon Press
Ashby, Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, Pergamon Press
Honeycombe, Steels, Microstructure and Properties, Edward Arnold publishers
Shackelford, Materials Science for Engineers
I.J. Polmear: Light Alloys, Metallurgy of the Light Metals
R.C. Reed: The Superalloys: Fundamentals and Applications, Cambridge
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Metals I
327-0612-00LMetals II
Planned to be offered for the last time in FS 2022.
3 credits2V + 1UR. Spolenak, M. Schinhammer, A. Wahlen
AbstractIntroduction to materials selection. Basic knowledge of major metallic materials: aluminium, magnesium, titanium, copper, iron and steel. Selected topics in high temperature materials: nickel and iron-base superalloys, intermetallics and refractory metals.
ObjectiveIntroduction to materials selection. Basic knowledge of major metallic materials: aluminium, magnesium, titanium, copper, iron and steel. Selected topics in high temperature materials: nickel and iron-base superalloys, intermetallics and refractory metals.
ContentThis course is devided into five parts:

A. Materials selection
Principles of materials properties maps
Introduction to the 'Materials selector' software package
Case studies

B. Light metals and alloys
Aluminium, magnesium, titanium
Properties and hardening mechanisms
Case studies in technological applications

C. Copper and its alloys

D. Iron and steel
The seven pros for steel
Fine grained steels, heat resistant steels
Steel and corrosion phenomena
Selection and application

E. High temperature alloys
Superalloys: iron, nickel, cobalt
Intermetallics: properties and application
Lecture notesPlease visit the Moodle-link for this lecture.
LiteratureGottstein, Physikalische Grundlagen der Materialkunde, Springer Verlag
Ashby/Jones, Engineering Materials 1 & 2, Pergamon Press
Ashby, Materials Selection in Mechanical Design, Pergamon Press
Porter/Easterling, Transformations in Metals and Alloys, Chapman & Hall
Bürgel, Handbuch Hochtemperatur-Werkstofftechnik, Vieweg Verlag
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Metals I
327-0712-00LNanometallurgy0 credits2SR. Spolenak
AbstractSeminar for Ph.D. students and researchers in the area of nanometallurgy.
ObjectiveDetailed education of researchers in the area of metallic materials in small dimensions as well as scientific presentation of research results.
ContentPresentation and discussion of latest research results.
Prerequisites / Notice- Requirements: Involvement in research activities.
- Lectures are generally in English.
327-2202-00LSize Effects in Materials4 credits4GR. Spolenak
AbstractThe core of this course explains how the behavior of materials changes, when their external dimensions become small (usually on the micro- to nanometer length scale) until quantum effects become dominant. This is illustrated by examples from all materials classes and further substantiated by case studies of applications ranging from micro- and nanoelectronics to optoelectronics.
ObjectiveTeaching goals:

to learn which materials are used in electronics, microelectronics and optoelectronics and why

to understand how materials properties change when their external dimensions approach the micro- and nanoscale

to grasp the materials and processing issues involved in miniaturized electronic, mechanical and optical systems

to be exposed to state of the art technologies for fabrication and characterization of such systems
ContentThe core of the course is the materials behavior in small dimensions. Focus will be put on scaling of electronic and mechanical properties, thin film mechanics, device reliability and integration issues when dissimilar materials are joined. Advanced characterization techniques specific to microcomponents will be presented. Finally possible future solutions to further miniaturization, such as carbon nanotubes or 3D integration molecular electronics, will be critically discussed. Excursions to microelectronic companies are part of the course.

Topics include:

Basics
Scaling laws and size effects
Energy scales in materials science
Length scales in materials science
Size-dependent color effects
Mechanical properties
Electronic properties
Measuring properties
Applications:
Fabrication of microcomponents
Materials for Microelectronics and MEMS/NEMS
Materials for Transistors
Quantum dots
Novel materials for optical telecommunication, optical information processing, optical data storage and data display
Lecture notesPlease visit the Moodle-link for this lecture
Literature"Thin Film Materials: Stress, Surface Evolution and Failure", L. B. Freund and S. Suresh, Cambridge University Press, 2003.

"Metal Based Thin Films for Electronics", K. Wetzig and C. M. Schneider (Eds.), Wiley-VCH, 2003

More literature will be announced in class.
Prerequisites / NoticeExcursion to IBM Laboratories, Rüschlikon

Prerequisites: Good understanding of materials science, equivalent to the Bachelor Degree in Materials Science at ETH Zurich
327-2204-00LMaterials at Work II4 credits4SR. Spolenak, D. Hegemann, E. Tervoort-Gorokhova
AbstractThis course attempts to prepare the student for a job as a materials engineer in industry. The gap between fundamental materials science and the materials engineering of products should be bridged. The focus lies on the practical application of fundamental knowledge allowing the students to experience application related materials concepts with a strong emphasis on case-study mediated learning.
ObjectiveTeaching goals:

to learn how materials are selected for a specific application

to understand how materials around us are produced and manufactured

to understand the value chain from raw material (feedstock, ores,...) to application

to be exposed to state of the art technologies for processing, joining and shaping

to be exposed to industry related materials issues and the corresponding language (terminology) and skills

to create an impression of how a job in industry "works", to improve the perception of the demands of a job in industry
ContentThe general outline for Materials at work is:

Strategic Materials (where do raw materials come from, who owns them, who owns the IP and can they be substituted)
Materials Selection (what is the optimal material (class) for a specific application)
Materials systems (subdivisions include all classical materials classes)
Processing
Joining (assembly)
Shaping
Materials and process scaling (from nm to m and vice versa, from mg to tons)
Sustainable materials manufacturing (cradle to cradle) Recycling (Energy recovery)
Materials testing

Materials at Work I focusses on Materials Selection, Polymers and Metals

Materials at Work II focusses on Metal processing, Ceramics and Surfaces
Lecture notesPlease use the Moodle-link
LiteratureManufacturing, Engineering & Technology
Serope Kalpakjian, Steven Schmid
ISBN: 978-0131489653
Prerequisites / NoticeMetalle 1,2
Polymere 1,2
Keramik 1,2
Materials at Work I
327-3002-00LMaterials for Mechanical Engineers4 credits2V + 1UR. Spolenak, A. R. Studart, R. Style
AbstractThis course provides a basic foundation in materials science for mechanical engineers. Students learns how to select the right material for the application at hand. In addition, the appropriate processing-microstructure-property relationship will lead to the fundamental understanding of concepts that determines the mechanical and functional properties.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course, the student will able to:
• choose the appropriate material for mechanical engineering applications
• find the optimal compromise between materials property, cost and ecological impact
• understand the most important concepts that allow for the tuning of mechanical and functional properties of materials
ContentBlock A: Materials Selection
• Principles of Materials Selection
• Introduction to the Cambridge Engineering Selector
• Cost optimization and penalty functions
• Ecoselection

Block B: Mechanical properties across materials classes
• Young's modulus from 1 Pa to 1 TPa
• Failure: yield strength, toughness, fracture toughness, and fracture energy
• Strategies to toughen materials from gels to metals.

Block C: Structural Light Weight Materials
• Aluminum and magnesium alloys
• Engineering and fiber-reinforced polymers

Block D: Structural Materials in the Body
• Strength, stiffness and wear resistance
• Processing, structure and properties of load-bearing implants

Block E: Structural High Temperature Materials
• Superalloys and refractory metals
• Structural high-temperature ceramics

Block F: Materials for Sensors
• Semiconductors
• Piezoelectrica

Block G: Dissipative dynamics and bonding
• Frequency dependent materials properties (from rheology of soft materials to vibration damping in structural materials)
• Adhesion energy and contact mechanics
• Peeling and delamination

Block H: Materials for 3D Printing
• Deposition methods and their consequences for materials (deposition by sintering, direct ink writing, fused deposition modeling, stereolithography)
• Additive manufacturing of structural and active Materials
Literature• Kalpakjian, Schmid, Werner, Werkstofftechnik
• Ashby, Materials Selection in Mechanical Design
• Meyers, Chawla, Mechanical Behavior of Materials
• Rösler, Harders, Bäker, Mechanisches Verhalten der Werkstoffe