André R. Studart: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2019

Name Prof. Dr. André R. Studart
FieldComplex Materials
Address
Complex Materials
ETH Zürich, HCI G 537
Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1-5/10
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 633 70 50
Fax+41 44 633 15 45
E-mailandre.studart@mat.ethz.ch
DepartmentMaterials
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
327-0301-00LMaterials Science I3 credits3GJ. F. Löffler, R. Schäublin, A. R. Studart, P. Uggowitzer
AbstractBasic concepts of metal physics, ceramics, polymers and their technology.
ObjectiveBased on the lecture 'Introduction to Materials Science' this lecture aims to give a detailed understanding of important aspects of materials science, with special emphasis on metallic and ceramic materials.
ContentThermodynamics and phase diagrams, crystal interfaces and microstructure, diffusional transformations in solids, and diffusionless transformations will be presented for metallic alloys.
The basics of the ionic and covalent chemical bonds, the bond energy, the crystalline structure, four important structural ceramics, and the properties of glasses and glass ceramics will be presented for ceramic materials.
Lecture notesFor metals see:
http://www.metphys.mat.ethz.ch/education/lectures/materialwissenschaft-i.html

For ceramics see:
http://www.complex.mat.ethz.ch/education/lectures.html
LiteratureMetals:
D. A. Porter, K. E. Easterling
Phase Transformations in Metals and Alloys - Second Edition
ISBN : 0-7487-5741-4
Nelson Thornes

Ceramics:
- Munz, D.; Fett, T: Ceramics, Mechanical Properties, Failure Behaviour, Materials Selection,
- Askeland & Phulé: Science and Engineering of Materials, 2003
- diverse CEN ISO Standards given in the slides
- Barsoum MW: Fundamentals of Ceramics:
- Chiang, Y.M.; Dunbar, B.; Kingery, W.D; Physical Ceramics, Principles für Ceramic Science and Engineering. Wiley , 1997
- Hannik, Kelly, Muddle: Transformation Toughening in Zirconia Containing Ceramics, J Am Ceram Soc 83 [3] 461-87 (2000)
- "High-Tech Ceramics: viewpoints and perspectives", ed G. Kostorz, Academic Press, 1989. Chapter 5, 59-101.


- "Brevieral Ceramics" published by the "Verband der Keramischen Industrie e.V.", ISBN 3-924158-77-0. partly its contents may be found in the internet @ http://www.keramverband.de/brevier_engl/brevier.htm or on our homepage

- Silicon-Based Structural Ceramics (Ceramic Transactions), Stephen C. Danforth (Editor), Brian W. Sheldon, American Ceramic Society, 2003,

- Silicon Nitride-1, Shigeyuki Somiya (Editor), M. Mitomo (Editor), M. Yoshimura (Editor), Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1990 3. Zirconia and Zirconia Ceramics. Second Edition, Stevens, R, Magnesium Elektron Ltd., 1986, pp. 51, 1986

- Stabilization of the tetragonal structure in zirconia microcrystals, RC Garvie, The Journal of Physical Chemistry, 1978

- Phase relationships in the zirconia-yttria system, HGM Scott - Journal of Materials Science, 1975, Springer

- Thommy Ekström and Mats Nygren, SiAION Ceramics J Am Cer Soc Volume 75 Page 259 - February 1992

- "Formation of beta -Si sub 3 N sub 4 solid solutions in the system Si, Al, O, N by reaction sintering--sintering of an Si sub 3 N sub 4 , AlN, Al sub 2 O sub 3 mixture" Boskovic, L J; Gauckler, L J, La Ceramica (Florence). Vol. 33, no. N-2, pp. 18-22. 1980.

- Alumina: Processing, Properties, and Applications, Dorre, E; Hubner, H, Springer-Verlag, 1984, pp. 329, 1984 9.
Prerequisites / Notice- In the first part of the lecture the bases are obtained for metals. In the second part the basics of cermics will be presented.
- One part of the lecture will be taught in English, but most of it in German.
327-0503-AALCeramics I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RM. Niederberger, T. Graule, A. R. Studart
AbstractIntroduction to ceramic processing
ObjectiveThe aim is the understanding of the basic principles of ceramic processing.
ContentBasic chemical processes for powder production.
Liquid-phase synthesis methods.
Sol-Gel processes.
Classical crystallization theory.
Gas phase reactions.
Basics of the collidal chemistry for suspension preparation and control.
Characterization techniques for powders and colloids.
Shaping techniques for bulk components and thin films.
Sintering processes and microstructural control.
LiteratureBooks and references will be provided on the lecture notes.
327-0503-00LCeramics I3 credits2V + 1UM. Niederberger, T. Graule, A. R. Studart
AbstractIntroduction to ceramic processing.
ObjectiveThe aim is the understanding of the basic principles of ceramic processing.
ContentBasic chemical processes for powder production.
Liquid-phase synthesis methods.
Sol-Gel processes.
Classical crystallization theory.
Gas phase reactions.
Basics of the collidal chemistry for suspension preparation and control.
Characterization techniques for powders and colloids.
Shaping techniques for bulk components and thin films.
Sintering processes and microstructural control.
LiteratureBooks and references will be given on the lecture notes.
327-1221-00LBiological and Bio-Inspired Materials Information
Students that already enroled in this course during their Bachelor's degree studies are not allowed to enrol again in their Master's.
4 credits3GA. R. Studart, I. Burgert, T. Keplinger, R. Nicolosi Libanori
AbstractThe aim of this course is to impart knowledge on the underlying principles governing the design of biological materials and on strategies to fabricate synthetic model systems whose structural organization resembles those of natural materials.
ObjectiveThe course first offers a comprehensive introduction to evolutive aspects of materials design in nature and a general overview about the most common biopolymers and biominerals found in biological materials. Next, current approaches to fabricate bio-inspired materials are presented, followed by a detailed evaluation of their structure-property relationships with focus on mechanical, optical, surface and adaptive properties.
ContentThis course is structured in 3 blocks:
Block (I): Fundamentals of engineering in biological materials
- Biological engineering principles
- Basic building blocks found in biological materials

Block (II): Replicating biological design principles in synthetic materials
- Biological and bio-inspired materials: polymer-reinforced and ceramic-toughened composites
- Lightweight biological and bio-inspired materials
- Functional biological and bio-inspired materials: surfaces, self-healing and adaptive materials

Block (III): Bio-inspired design and systems
- Mechanical actuation - plant systems
- Bio-inspiration in the built environment
Lecture notesCopies of the slides will be made available for download before each lecture.
LiteratureThe course is mainly based on the books listed below. Additional references will be provided during the lectures.

1. M. A. Meyers and P-Y. Chen; Biological Materials Science - Biological Materials, Bioinspired Materials and Biomaterials. (Cambridge University Press, 2014).
2. P. Fratzl, J. W. C. Dunlop and R. Weinkamer; Materials Design Inspired by Nature: Function Through Inner Architecture. (The Royal Society of Chemistry, 2013).
3. A. R. Studart, R. Libanori, R. M. Erb, Functional Gradients in Biological Composites in Bio- and Bioinspired Nanomaterials. (Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 2014), pp. 335-368.