André R. Studart: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2019

Name Prof. Dr. André R. Studart
FieldComplex Materials
Address
Complex Materials
ETH Zürich, HCI G 537
Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 1-5/10
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 633 70 50
Fax+41 44 633 15 45
E-mailandre.studart@mat.ethz.ch
DepartmentMaterials
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
327-0503-AALCeramics I
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
3 credits6RM. Niederberger, T. Graule, A. R. Studart
AbstractIntroduction to ceramic processing
ObjectiveThe aim is the understanding of the basic principles of ceramic processing
ContentBasic chemical processes for powder production.
Liquid-phase synthesis methods.
Sol-Gel processes.
Solubility product.
Principle of Le Chatelier.
Classical crystallization theory.
Gas phase reactions.
Basics of the collidal chemistry for suspension preparation and control.
Characterization techniques for powders and colloids.
Shaping techniques for bulk components and thin films.
Sintering processes and microstructural control.
LiteratureAdditional references are given on the lecture notes.
327-0603-00LCeramics II3 credits2V + 1UA. R. Studart, K. Conder
AbstractUnderstanding of the electrical, dielectric and optical properties of functional ceramics for materials engineers, physicists and electrical engineers. An introduction is given to modern ceramics materials with multiple functions.
ObjectiveCeramics II covers the basic principles of functional ceramics such as linear and non-linear dielectrics, semiconductors, ionic and mixed ionic-electronic conductors as well as materials aspects of high temperature superconductors. Examples of applications cover the range from piezo-, pyro and opto-electronic materials over sensors and solid oxide fuel cells to squids and fault current limiters with superconducting compounds.
At the end of the course, the students should be able to select the chemistry, design the microstructure and devise processing routes to fabricate functional ceramics for electronic, electromechanical, optical and magnetic applications.
Content- Applications of functional ceramics
- Dieletrics fundamentals & insulators
- Capacitors & resonators
- Ferroelectricity & piezoelectricity
- Pyroelectricity and electro-optic ceramics
- Defect chemistry
- Conductors
- Impedance spectroscopy
- Magnetic ceramics
- Superconductors
Lecture notessee:
https://www.complex.mat.ethz.ch/education/courses/ceramics2
LiteratureElectroceramics; J.A.Moulson
Free download of the book in ETH domain is possible following the link:
http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/booktoc/104557643

Principles of Electronic Ceramics; L.L.Hench, J.K.West
327-2204-00LMaterials at Work II4 credits4SR. Spolenak, D. Hegemann, A. R. Studart
AbstractThis course attempts to prepare the student for a job as a materials engineer in industry. The gap between fundamental materials science and the materials engineering of products should be bridged. The focus lies on the practical application of fundamental knowledge allowing the students to experience application related materials concepts with a strong emphasis on case-study mediated learning.
ObjectiveTeaching goals:

to learn how materials are selected for a specific application

to understand how materials around us are produced and manufactured

to understand the value chain from raw material (feedstock, ores,...) to application

to be exposed to state of the art technologies for processing, joining and shaping

to be exposed to industry related materials issues and the corresponding language (terminology) and skills

to create an impression of how a job in industry "works", to improve the perception of the demands of a job in industry
ContentThe general outline for Materials at work is:

Strategic Materials (where do raw materials come from, who owns them, who owns the IP and can they be substituted)
Materials Selection (what is the optimal material (class) for a specific application)
Materials systems (subdivisions include all classical materials classes)
Processing
Joining (assembly)
Shaping
Materials and process scaling (from nm to m and vice versa, from mg to tons)
Sustainable materials manufacturing (cradle to cradle) Recycling (Energy recovery)
Materials testing

Materials at Work I focusses on Materials Selection, Polymers and Metals

Materials at Work II focusses on Metal processing, Ceramics and Surfaces
Lecture notesPlease use the Moodle-link
LiteratureManufacturing, Engineering & Technology
Serope Kalpakjian, Steven Schmid
ISBN: 978-0131489653
Prerequisites / NoticeMetals 1,2
Polymers 1,2
Ceramics 1,2
Materials at Work I
327-2224-00LMaP Distinguished Lecture Series on Additive Manufacturing
This course is primarily designed for MSc and doctoral students. Guests are welcome.
1 credit2SL. Schefer, M. Meboldt, A. R. Studart
AbstractThis course is an interdisciplinary colloquium on Additive Manufacturing (AM) involving different internationally renowned speakers from academia and industry giving lectures about their cutting-edge research, which highlights the state-of-the-art and frontiers in the AM field.
ObjectiveParticipants become acquainted with the state-of-the-art and frontiers in Additive Manufacturing, which is a topic of global and future relevance from the field of materials and process engineering. The self-study of relevant literature and active participation in discussions following presentations by internationally renowned speaker stimulate critical thinking and allow participants to deliberately discuss challenges and opportunities with leading academics and industrial experts and to exchange ideas within an interdisciplinary community.
ContentThis course is a colloquium involving a selected mix of internationally renowned speaker from academia and industry who present their cutting-edge research in the field of Additive Manufacturing. The self-study of relevant pre-read literature provided in advance to each lecture serves as a basis for active participation in the critical discussions following each presentation.
Lecture notesSelected scientific pre-read literature (max. three articles per lecture) relevant for and discussed at the end of each individual lecture is posted in advance on the course web page
Prerequisites / NoticeParticipants should have a solid background in materials science and/or engineering.
327-3002-00LMaterials for Mechanical Engineers4 credits2V + 1UR. Spolenak, E. Dufresne, A. R. Studart
AbstractThis course provides a basic foundation in materials science for mechanical engineers. Students learns how to select the right material for the application at hand. In addition, the appropriate processing-microstructure-property relationship will lead to the fundamental understanding of concepts that determines the mechanical and functional properties.
ObjectiveAt the end of the course, the student will able to:
• choose the appropriate material for mechanical engineering applications
• find the optimal compromise between materials property, cost and ecological impact
• understand the most important concepts that allow for the tuning of mechanical and functional properties of materials
ContentBlock A: Materials Selection
• Principles of Materials Selection
• Introduction to the Cambridge Engineering Selector
• Cost optimization and penalty functions
• Ecoselection

Block B: Mechanical properties across materials classes
• Young's modulus from 1 Pa to 1 TPa
• Failure: yield strength, toughness, fracture toughness, and fracture energy
• Strategies to toughen materials from gels to metals.

Block C: Structural Light Weight Materials
• Aluminum and magnesium alloys
• Engineering and fiber-reinforced polymers

Block D: Structural Materials in the Body
• Strength, stiffness and wear resistance
• Processing, structure and properties of load-bearing implants

Block E: Structural High Temperature Materials
• Superalloys and refractory metals
• Structural high-temperature ceramics

Block F: Materials for Sensors
• Semiconductors
• Piezoelectrica

Block G: Dissipative dynamics and bonding
• Frequency dependent materials properties (from rheology of soft materials to vibration damping in structural materials)
• Adhesion energy and contact mechanics
• Peeling and delamination

Block H: Materials for 3D Printing
• Deposition methods and their consequences for materials (deposition by sintering, direct ink writing, fused deposition modeling, stereolithography)
• Additive manufacturing of structural and active Materials
Literature• Kalpakjian, Schmid, Werner, Werkstofftechnik
• Ashby, Materials Selection in Mechanical Design
• Meyers, Chawla, Mechanical Behavior of Materials
• Rösler, Harders, Bäker, Mechanisches Verhalten der Werkstoffe