Michael Hampe: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2021

Award: The Golden Owl
Name Prof. Dr. Michael Hampe
FieldPhilosophie
Address
Professur für Philosophie
ETH Zürich, CLW C 2
Clausiusstrasse 49
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 30 40
Fax+41 44 632 15 61
E-mailhampe@phil.gess.ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
851-0162-00LPhilosophy of Physics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.
3 credits3SM. Hampe, R. Wallny
AbstractClose reading of and reflection about selected texts from physicists (e.g. C.F: Weizsäcker, Wilczek, Susskind) on the philosophical problems and consequences of their work.
ObjectiveParticipants should develop a clear view of the epistemological foundations of their work and its consequences for philosophy of science and philosophy of nature.
ContentNewton's opus magnum of 1687 is still called a philosophy of nature: "Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica". The separation of physics from philosophy is new, and institutionally executed only in the 19th century. Since than the experiment is not a philosophical method and mahematical symbolization not part of the languages of philosophy anymore. But although the subjects were divided methodically they stayed in contact via their content. This can be seen in the reflexions of physicists like C. F: v. Weizsächer, Frank Wilczek or Leonard Susskind, who were all concerned with epistemological questions and topics related to the philosophy of science and philosophy of nature. The seminar is devoted to these reflections and will ask in what relation the philosophy of physicists stands to the physics of their time. We will discuss problems of the unity of physics, of emerging laws and of the beauty or ugliness of the physical universe resp. the theories about it.
Literaturesee moodle
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course follows the concept of an "inverted classroom". A prerequisite is that the relevant texts have been read prior to the lecture. The assistants will give support.
851-0168-00LAristotle´s Lecture on Physics3 credits2SM. Hampe
AbstractAristotle´s lecture on physics is a theorie of movement. But his concept of movement or change (kinesis) is much more general than the modern one, that applies only to changes of place by bodies. This as far reaching consequences. Aristotle´s physics can therefore be interpreted as a general theory of natural processes.
ObjectiveStudents should develop a clear understanding of a complex pre-modern theory of nature.
ContentAristotle´s lecture on physics is a theorie of movement. But his concept of movement or change (kinesis) is much more general than the modern one, that applies only to changes of place by bodies. This as far reaching consequences. Aristotle´s physics can therefore be interpreted as a general theory of natural processes.
862-0004-13LResearch Colloquium Philosophy for Master Students and PhD (HS 2021) Restricted registration - show details
For MAGPW and PhD students of D-GESS only.
2 credits1KR. Wagner, M. Hampe, L. Wingert
AbstractPh.D. students, post docs, members of staff, and senior colleagues from other philosophy departments will report on their work in progress. Furthermore, promissing new philosophical articles and parts of new philosophical books will be studied.
ObjectiveIdeas and arguments dealing with systematic problems especially in epistemology, ethics, political philosophy, and the philosophy of mind will be scrutinized and elaborated.
862-0110-00LDialectics Restricted registration - show details
For students MA Philosophy and History of Science only.
3 credits2SM. Hampe
AbstractIntroduction to dialectics in European philosophy from the Platonic dialogues, ancient skepticism, to the Kantian antinomies and Hegelian philosophy to Adorno's negative dialectics.
ObjectiveThe MAGPW students should get to know the forms and functions of dialectics in European philosophy, from the Platonic dialogues, ancient skepticism, the Kantian antinomies and Hegelian philosophy to Adorno's negative dialectics.