Sabine Werner: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2020

Award: The Golden Owl
Name Prof. Dr. Sabine Werner
FieldZellbiologie
Address
Inst. f. Molecular Health Sciences
ETH Zürich, HPL F 12
Otto-Stern-Weg 7
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 633 39 41
Fax+41 44 633 11 74
E-mailsabine.werner@biol.ethz.ch
DepartmentBiology
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
551-0103-AALFundamentals of Biology II: Cell Biology
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
5 credits11RE. Hafen, Y. Barral, U. Kutay, G. Schertler, U. Suter, S. Werner
AbstractThe goal of this course is to provide students with a wide general understanding in cell biology. With this material as a foundation, students have enough of a cell biological basis to begin their specialization not only in cell biology but also in related fields such as biochemistry, microbiology, pharmacological sciences, molecular biology, and others.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide students with a wide general understanding cell biology. With this material as a foundation, students have enough of a cell biological basis to begin their specialization not only in cell biology but also in related fields such as biochemistry, microbiology, pharmacological sciences, molecular biology, and others.
ContentThe focus is animal cells and the development of multicellular organisms with a clear emphasis on the molecular basis of cellular structures and phenomena. The topics include biological membranes, the cytoskeleton, protein sorting, energy metabolism, cell cycle and division, viruses, extracellular matrix, cell signaling, embryonic development and cancer research.
LiteratureAlberts et al. 'Molecular Biology of the Cell' 6th edition, 2014, ISBN 9780815344322 (hard cover) and ISBN 9780815345244 (paperback).

Topic/Lecturer/Chapter/Pages:

Analyzing cells & molecules / Gebhard Schertler/8/ 439-463;
Membrane structure / Gebhard Schertler/ 10/ 565-595;
Compartments and Sorting/ Ulrike Kutay/12+14+6/641-694/755-758/782-783/315-320/325 -333/Table 6-2/Figure6-20, 6-21, 6-32, 6-34;
Intracellular Membrane Traffic/ Ulrike Kutay/13/695-752;
The Cytoskeleton/ Ulrike Kutay/ 16/889 - 948 (only the essentials);
Membrane Transport of Small Molecules and the Electrical Properties of Membranes /Sabine Werner/11/597 - 633;
Mechanisms of Cell Communication / Sabine Werner/15/813-876;
Cancer/ Sabine Werner/20/1091-1141;
Cell Junctions and Extracellular Matrix/Ueli Suter / 1035-1081;
Stem Cells and Tissue Renewal/Ueli Suter /1217-1262;
Development of Multicellular organisms/ Ernst Hafen/ 21/ 1145-1179 /1184-1198/1198-1213;
Cell Migration/Joao Matos/951-960;
Cell Death/Joao Matos/1021-1032;
Cell Cycle/chromosome segregation/Cell division/Meiosis/Joao Matos/ 963-1018.
Prerequisites / Noticenone
551-0103-00LFundamentals of Biology II: Cell Biology5 credits5VS. Werner, Y. Barral, U. Kutay, G. Schertler, U. Suter, I. Zemp
AbstractThe goal of this course is to provide students with a wide general understanding in cell biology. With this material as a foundation, students have enough of a cell biological basis to begin their specialization not only in cell biology but also in related fields such as biochemistry, microbiology, pharmacological sciences, molecular biology, and others.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide students with a wide general understanding cell biology. With this material as a foundation, students have enough of a cell biological basis to begin their specialization not only in cell biology but also in related fields such as biochemistry, microbiology, pharmacological sciences, molecular biology, and others.
ContentThe focus is animal cells and the development of multicellular organisms with a clear emphasis on the molecular basis of cellular structures and phenomena. The topics include biological membranes, the cytoskeleton, protein sorting, energy metabolism, cell cycle and division, viruses, extracellular matrix, cell signaling, embryonic development and cancer research.
Lecture notesThe lectures are presented in the Powerpoint format. These are available on the WEB for ETH students over the nethz (Moodle). Some lectures are available on the ETH WEB site in a live format (Livestream) at the above WEB site.
LiteratureThe lectures follow Alberts et al. `Molecular Biology of the Cell' 6th edition, 2014, ISBN 9780815344322 (hard cover) and ISBN 9780815345244
(paperback).
Prerequisites / NoticeSome of the lectures are given in the English language. Certain sections of the text-book must be studied by self-instruction.
551-1511-00LParallels Between Tissue Repair and Cancer Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.
The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.

General safety regulations for all block courses:
-Whenever possible the distance rules have to be respected
-All students have to wear masks throughout the course (keep reserve masks ready)
-The installation and activation of the Swiss Covid-App is highly encouraged
-Any additional rules for individual courses have to be respected
-Students showing any COVID-19 symptoms are not allowed to enter ETH buildings and have to inform the course responsible
6 credits7PS. Werner, M. Schäfer
AbstractThis course aims at the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying tissue repair processes in response to different insults. The focus will be on repair of the skin and the liver. In addition, we will highlight the parallels and differences between tissue repair and cancer.
ObjectiveTo learn the cellular and molecular principles underlying tissue repair processes, in particular in the skin and in the liver, and the parallels and differences to cancer. To learn modern technologies in Molecular and Cellular Biology as well as Histology and to use these technologies to study questions related to mechanisms underlying tissue repair and cancer.
ContentThis course aims at the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying tissue repair processes in response to different insults. The focus will be on repair of the skin and the liver. In addition, we will highlight the parallels and differences between tissue repair and cancer. Experimental approaches include biochemical studies, molecular and cellular studies using cultured cell lines and primary cells, as well as analysis of murine and human tissues.
The course combines practical work with lectures, discussions, project preparations and presentations.
Lecture notessiehe Lernmaterialien