Thomas Bernauer: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2023

Name Prof. Dr. Thomas Bernauer
FieldInternationale Beziehungen
Address
CIS
ETH Zürich, IFW C 45.1
Haldeneggsteig 4
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 67 71
E-mailthbe0520@ethz.ch
DepartmentHumanities, Social and Political Sciences
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
857-0004-00LPolitical Economy Restricted registration - show details 8 credits3ST. Bernauer, V. Koubi
AbstractThis seminar focuses on the interplay of political and economic factors in shaping policy outcomes at local to global levels. It concentrates on the application of economic logic to political questions and the influence of political processes and institutions on economic activity.
ObjectiveThis seminar focuses on the interplay of political and economic factors in shaping policy outcomes at local to global levels. It concentrates on the application of economic logic to political questions and the influence of political processes and institutions on economic activity.
ContentThis seminar focuses on the interplay of political and economic factors in shaping policy outcomes at local to global levels. It focuses on the application of economic logic to political questions and the influence of political processes and institutions on economic activity. It draws on a broad range of theoretical perspectives from comparative and international politics, positive political theory, public choice, and economics. We first review basic theoretical models from political science and economics and then use them to investigate a number of specific areas of interest. We examine the effects of special interests on government regulation of economic activity, the determinants of the size of government, economic growth and sustainable development, the politics of international trade and investment, and monetary and fiscal policy. We seek to make students familiar not only with the theoretical and methodological approaches used in this area of study, but also with important research issues in comparative and international political economy.
Lecture notessee http://www.cis.ethz.ch/education/macis/courses
Prerequisites / NoticeCore course in the MA CIS program. Restricted to students of MA CIS. 8 ECTS credit points upon successful completion. The overall grade will be based on a review essay, a written mid-term exam, and a written end-of-semester exam.
860-0001-00LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 27.

Priority for Science, Technology, and Policy Master.
3 credits2GT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractStudents acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard.
ObjectivePublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies. They learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels, and what challenges arise in this regard. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organisations.
Lecture notesCourse materials can be found on Moodle.
LiteratureReadings can be found on Moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is a Master level course. The course is capped at 27 students, with ISTP Master students having priority.
860-0001-01LPublic Institutions and Policy-Making Processes; Research Paper Restricted registration - show details
Prerequisite: you have to be enrolled in 860-0001-00L during the same semester.
3 credits3AT. Bernauer, S. Bechtold, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractThis is an add-on module to the course: 860-0001-00L. It focuses on students writing an essay on an issue covered by the main course 860-0001-00L.
ObjectiveStudents learn how to write an essay on a policy issue they select.
ContentPublic policies result from decision-making processes that take place within formal institutions of the state (parliament, government, public administration, courts). That is, policies are shaped by the characteristics of decision-making processes and the characteristics of public institutions and related actors (e.g. interest groups). In this course, students acquire the contextual knowledge for analyzing public policies - hence this course is complementary to the ISTP course on concepts and methods of policy analysis. Students learn why and how public policies and laws are developed, designed, and implemented at national and international levels. The course is organized in three modules. The first module (taught by Stefan Bechtold) examines basic concepts and the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies. The second module (taught by Thomas Bernauer) deals with the functioning of legislatures, governments, and interest groups. The third module (taught by Frank Schimmelfennig) focuses on the European Union and international organizations. This teaching unit is an add-on module to the course: 860-0001-00L. It focuses on students writing an essay on an issue covered by the main course 860-0001-00L.
LiteratureSee Moodle
Prerequisites / NoticeAccess only for ISTP MSc students also enrolled in 860-0001-00L
CompetenciesCompetencies
Personal CompetenciesCreative Thinkingfostered
860-0005-01LColloquium Science, Technology, and Policy (FS) Information Restricted registration - show details 1 credit1KT. Schmidt, T. Bernauer
AbstractPresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
ObjectivePresentations by invited guest speakers from academia and practice/policy. Students are assigned to play a leading role in the discussion and write a report on the respective event.
ContentSee program on the ISTP website: http://www.istp.ethz.ch/events/colloquium.html
860-0100-00LDoctoral Colloquium in Public Policy
Only PhD students. Permission from lecturers is required.
1 credit1KM. Krauser, T. Bernauer, R. Garrett, T. Schmidt, B. Steffen
AbstractIn this colloquium, doctoral students present their research plan within the first year of their doctorate, which is reviewed by three professors affiliated with the ISTP and commented on by the peer students registered in the colloquium. We recommend attending the colloquium for two semesters and present the research plan in the second semester.
ObjectiveObtain feedback on research ideas the doctoral research plan and have the research plan approved by three faculty, as required by ETH Zurich.
ContentDoctoral students (typically affiliated with the ISTP or groups of ISTP members) attend this colloquium for one to two semesters. During the first (voluntary) semester they present their preliminary research ideas. During the second (obligatory) semester, they present their research plan, which is reviewed by three professors affiliated with the ISTP. The research plan should not be longer than 20 pages (references excluded). The second semester will be credited with 1 ECTS. All students are supposed to read and comment on their peers’ research ideas and plans throughout both semesters. The results of the review are submitted to the doctoral committee of D-GESS or other ETH departments where ISTP-affiliated doctoral students intend to graduate.
860-0101-00LDesigning Public Policy Research
Only PhD students. Permission from lecturers is required.
2 credits2SB. Steffen, T. Bernauer, Y. Borofsky, T. Schmidt
AbstractPhD students in public policy (or related fields) get an introduction to epistemology and an overview of different methodological approaches. The course will help them design their own (interdisciplinary) research and create meaningful and policy-relevant insights.
ObjectiveStudents should be able to understand how (policy-relevant) knowledge can be created and what the potentials and limits of different research designs and methodologies are.
ContentAfter an introduction to epistemology and the philosophy of science, students will gain insights into different research approaches, including qualitative and quantitative empirical designs, computational modelling, and conceptual and analytical approaches.
877-0101-00LTechnology, Society, Markets and the State Restricted registration - show details 6 credits5GT. Schmidt, T. Bernauer, F. Schimmelfennig
AbstractTechnological innovation is seldom entirely market-driven but often requires policy intervention. This module will introduce the participants into the literature that aims to understand technology and the underlying markets and its interaction with policy and its underlying politics. Besides an academic perspective, it will introduce practitioners working at the technology-policy interface.
ObjectiveIntroduction:
Participants understand (1) what public policy and policy analysis are, (2) why policy analysis is important for evidence-based policy-making, (3) how policy analysis is undertaken in a consulting firm, and (4) they learn from each other for which current professional challenges policy analysis will be useful.
Technology, Society, Markets, and the State:
Participants understand (1) what the key technological innovations in history have been, (2) how technological innovation unfolds and what factors drive it or slow it down, (3) what role the state (public policy, regulatory frameworks), markets (consumers, firms), and other stakeholders play in this regard.
Political Institutions and Policy-Making Processes:
Understand (1) how electoral systems, legislatures, government, public administrations, the judiciary, and interest groups function and shape policy choices, (2) the role of law, law-making, and law enforcement in modern societies, (3) how the European Union and international organisations decide on and implement policies.
LiteratureCourse materials can be found on Moodle.
877-0121-00LPublic Sphere and Stakeholders in Policy-Making Restricted registration - show details 6 credits4GT. Bernauer, D. Kaufmann, M. Stauffacher
AbstractCitizens, consumers, firms, and other stakeholders play an important role in designing and implementing policies that affect and/or are affected by technology. This module enables participants to understand what role public opinion and behavioural approaches play in policy design and implementation, and to systematically design and analyse citizen and stakeholder participation in policy-making.
ObjectivePublic Opinion and Behavioural Public Policy Analysis:
Participants understand (1) what role public opinion plays in policy design and implementation processes, (2) how public opinion surveys are designed, (3) how public opinion data is collected, (4) how such data is analysed, (5) how social media data can be used to assess public opinion, (6) how behavioural (field) experiments can be used for policy analysis.
Citizen and Stakeholder Participation in Policy-Making:
Participants understand (1) what forms of citizen and stakeholder participation can be used when policy interventions are designed and implemented, (2) how such participation can influence decision processes, policy choices, and policy outcomes, (3) what the pitfalls of particular participation forms are and how they can be avoided.
LiteratureCourse materials can be found on Moodle.
877-0141-00LCommunication and Negotiation Restricted registration - show details 3 credits2GT. Bernauer
AbstractThis module enables participants to understand and assess political communication and information-processing techniques, strategies and activities. It also enables them to identify different negotiation situations and apply respective negotiation approaches. These are important skills in order to effectively co-design policies through collaboration between scientists and political practitioners.
ObjectivePolitical Communication:
Participants (1) understand key communication and information-​processing principles and techniques, (2) are able to assess political communication strategies and activities, and (3) are able to identify appropriate creative solutions to political communication challenges.
Negotiations:
Participants (1) understand and are able to identify different negotiation situations, (2) analyse specific cases, and discuss respective negotiation approaches based on important negotiation methods.
LiteratureCourse materials can be found on Moodle.