Rudolf Glockshuber: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2018

Name Prof. Dr. Rudolf Glockshuber
FieldMolecular Biology
Address
Inst. f. Molekularbiol.u.Biophysik
ETH Zürich, HPK E 17
Otto-Stern-Weg 5
8093 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 633 68 19
Fax+41 44 633 10 36
E-mailrudi@mol.biol.ethz.ch
DepartmentBiology
RelationshipFull Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
551-0013-AALBiochemistry
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
2 credits4RR. Glockshuber
AbstractThe lecture is a basic introductory course on the molecular principles of biology for students who need to pass this course for admission to their MSc curriculum.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to give the students a basic understanding of the molecules that build a cell and make it function, and the basic principles of metabolism and molecular genetics
ContentThe course content is based on the following chapters of the textbook Biochemistry (Berg, Tymoczko, Stryer, 7th edition, 2012, Freeman & Co, New York)

Chapter 1: The molecular design of life
Chapter 2: Protein composition and structure
Chapter 3: Exploring proteins and proteomes
Chapter 4: DNA, RNA and the flow of information
Chapter 5: Exploring Genes and Genomes
Chapter 7: Hemoglobin
Chapter 8: Enzymes and the basic concepts of catalysis
Chapter 11: Carbohydrates
Chapter 12: Lipids and cell membranes
Chapter 15: Metabolism: Basic concepts and design
LiteratureBiochemistry (Berg, Tymoczko, Stryer, 7th edition, 2012, Freeman & Co, New York)
551-0438-00LProtein Folding, Assembly and Degradation Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 6.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
6 credits7GR. Glockshuber, E. Weber-Ban
AbstractStudents will carry out defined research projects related to the current research topics of the groups of Prof. Glockshuber and Prof. Weber-Ban. The topics include mechanistic studies on the assembly of adhesive pili from pathogenic bacteria, disulfide bond formation in the bacterial periplasm, ATP-dependent chaperone-protease complexes and formation of amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disese.
ObjectiveThe course should enable the students to understand and apply biophysical methods, in particular kinetic and spectroscopic methods, to unravel the mechanism of complex reactions of biological macromolecules and assemblies in a quantitative manner.
ContentThe students will be tutored in their experimental work by doctoral or postdoctoral students from the Glockshuber or Weber-Ban group. In addition, the course includes specific lectures that provide the theoretical background for the experimental work, as well as excercises on the numeric evaluation of biophysical data, and literature work.

Participation in one of the following projects will be possible:

Projects of the Glockshuber group:
- Purification, biophysical characterization and structure determiation of enzymes required for disulfide bond formation in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria.
- Mechanistic studies on the assembly of type 1 pili from pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. In vitro reconstitution of pilus assembly from all purified components. Characterization of folding, stability and assembly behaviour of individual pilus subunits.
- Identification of intermediates in the aggregation of the human Abeta peptide

Experimental work on these projects involves
- Molecular cloning, recombinant protein production in E. coli and protein purification
- Protein crystallization
- Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of conformational changes in proteins and protein-ligand interactions by fluorescence and circular dischoism spectroscopy
- Analysis of rapid reactions by stopped-flow fluorescence
- Negative-stain electron microscopy
- Light scattering



Projects of the Weber-Ban group:

- Generation and purification of site-directed variants of the E. coli ClpA/P protease and chaperone-proteasome complexes from other organisms, their biophysical characterization, including rapid kinetics by stopped-flow methods, ATPase activity measurtements, negative-stain electron microscopy and light scattering
Prerequisites / NoticeAttendance of the concept course "Biomolecular Structure and Mechanism I" (551-0307-00L) in the autumn semester is highly recommended for acquiring the theoretical background to this block course.
551-1323-AALFundamentals of Biology II: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Enrolment ONLY for MSc students with a decree declaring this course unit as an additional admission requirement.

Any other students (e.g. incoming exchange students, doctoral students) CANNOT enrol for this course unit.
4 credits11RK. Locher, N. Ban, R. Glockshuber, E. Weber-Ban
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to Biochemistry / Molecular Biology with some emphasis on chemical and biophysical aspects.
ObjectiveTopics include the structure-function
relationship of proteins / nucleic acids, protein folding, enzymatic catalysis, cellular pathways involved in bioenergetics and the biosynthesis and breakdown of amino acids, glycans, nucleotides, fatty acids and phospholipids, and steroids. There will also be a discussion of DNA replication and repair, transcription, and translation.
Lecture notesnone
Literature"Biochemistry",
Berg/Tymoczko/Stryer, 8th edition, Palgrave Macmillan, International edition
551-1402-00LMolecular and Structural Biology VI: Biophysical Analysis of Macromolecular Mechanisms
This course is strongly recommended for the Masters Major "Biology and Biophysics".
4 credits2VR. Glockshuber, T. Ishikawa, S. Jonas, B. Schuler, E. Weber-Ban
AbstractThe course is focussed on biophysical methods for characterising conformational transitions and reaction mechanisms of proteins and biological mecromolecules, with focus on methods that have not been covered in the Biology Bachelor Curriculum.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is to give the students a broad overview on biopyhsical techniques available for studying conformational transitions and complex reaction mechanisms of biological macromolecules. The course is particularly suited for students enrolled in the Majors "Structural Biology and Biophysics", "Biochemistry" and "Chemical Biology" of the Biology MSc curriculum, as well as for MSc students of Chemistry and Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences".
ContentThe biophysical methods covered in the course include advanced reaction kinetics, methods for the thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of protein-ligand interactions, classical and dynamic light scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, spectroscopic techniques such as fluorescence anisotropy, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and single molecule fluorescence spectrosopy, modern electron microscopy techniques, atomic force microscopy, and isothermal and differential scanning calorimetry.
Lecture notesCourse material from the individual lecturers wil be made available at the sharepoint website

https://team.biol.ethz.ch/e-learn/551-1402-00L
Prerequisites / NoticeFinished BSc curriculum in Biology, Chemistry or Interdisciplinary Natural Sciences. The course is also adequate for doctoral students with research projects in structural biology, biophysics, biochemistry and chemical biology.
551-1620-00LMolecular Biology, Biophysics1 credit1KR. Glockshuber, F. Allain, N. Ban, K. Locher, E. Weber-Ban, K. Wüthrich
AbstractThe course consists of a series of research seminars on Structural Biology and Biophysics, given by both scientists of the National Center of Competence in Research (NCCR) in Structural Biology and external speakers.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is to provide doctoral and postdoctoral students with a broad overview on the most recent developments in biochemistry, structural biology and biophysics.
Prerequisites / NoticeInformation on the individual seminars is provided on the following websites:
http://www.structuralbiology.unizh.ch/events005.asp
http://www.biol.ethz.ch/dbiol-cal/index