Moira Norrie: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2017

Name Prof. em. Dr. Moira Norrie
FieldInformatik
E-mailnorrie@inf.ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.globis.ethz.ch
DepartmentComputer Science
RelationshipProfessor emerita

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
252-0215-00LInformation Systems Information
Diese Lehrveranstaltung wird im FS17 zum letzten Mal in dieser Form angeboten.
8 credits4V + 2U + 1AM. Norrie
AbstractThe course goes beyond relational technologies to examine the range of different database technologies available today. It also introduces the basic concepts of information retrieval and discusses the design decisions behind modern information system architectures.
ObjectiveThe goal of the course is to introduce students to the wide range of technologies in use today for data storage and retrieval. This will include extensions of relational database technologies, non-relational database systems and information retrieval systems. Through the use of a case study, students will also learn about modern information system architectures and the design decisions behind them.
ContentThe course follows on from an earlier course on relational database technologies by introducing other database paradigms and extensions to relational systems. Students will gain experience of working with object, NoSQL and XML databases and the course will examine the features of these systems in terms of their approaches to storage, querying and transaction management and how they compare to relational systems and each other. The course will also look at how relational systems have been extended to support specific types of data, for example spatial, temporal and text data. In the second half of the course, the students will be introduced to modern information system architectures that build on one or more database technologies and a case study will be used to examine the design decisions behind such architectures. The case study will also be used to introduce students to the problems and techniques associated with integration, data quality and evolution in systems for large-scale, long-term data management. The last part of the course will introduce the basic concepts of information retrieval systems, web search and web data extraction.
LiteratureDatabase Management Systems, Raghu Ramakrishnan and Johannes Gehrke, 3rd edition, pub McGraw Hill, 2003.
252-0374-00LWeb Engineering Information
The course will be offered for the last time.
6 credits2V + 2U + 1AM. Norrie
AbstractThe course teaches students about the basic principles of web engineering by examining the various technologies used in modern web sites in detail together with the step-by-step processes used to develop state-of-the art web sites.
ObjectiveThe goals of the course are that students should be able to:
- systematically develop state-of-the-art web sites using a range of technologies, platforms and frameworks in common use
- understand the role of different technologies and how they are combined in practice
- analyse requirements and select appropriate technologies, platforms and frameworks
ContentThe first half of the course will introduce the various technologies used in state-of-the-art websites together with the widespread interface-driven development process. From the beginning, we will cater for access from multiple devices such as mobile phones and tablets as well as desktop browsers and show how technologies such as HTML5, CSS3 and JavaScript can be used to support rich forms of interaction. The concepts behind modern content management platforms such as WordPress will be introduced and students will gain practical experience of working with such a platform in terms of extending its functionality as well as developing websites.
The second half of the course will introduce various programming frameworks for website development and students will gain experience of working with various JavaScript frameworks, including ones developed to support novel forms of interaction and applications that run across two or more devices. The final lectures will examine user experience issues and future trends.
The material covered in lectures will be supported by a series of practical exercises.
252-0807-00LInformation Systems Laboratory Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 16.

In the Master Programme max. 10 credits can be accounted by Labs on top of the Interfocus Courses. Additional Labs will be listed on the Addendum.
10 credits9PM. Norrie
AbstractThe purpose of this laboratory course is to practically explore modern techniques to build large-scale distributed information systems. Participants will work in groups of three or more students, and develop projects in several phases.
ObjectiveThe students will gain experience of working with technologies used in the design and development of information systems.
ContentFirst week: Kick-off meeting and project assignment
Second week: Meeting with the project supervisor to discuss the goals and scope of the project.
During the semester: Individual group work. Each team member should contribute to the project roughly about 10h/week, excluding any necessary reading or self-studying (e.g. the time spent to learn a new technology). In addition, it is expected that each team can meet with their supervisor on a regular basis.
End of semester: Final presentation.
252-0924-00LOMS Case Study II Information 2 credits2SM. Norrie
AbstractThis doctoral seminar consists of a series of talks and discussions covering the history and foundations of OMS, related work and on-going OMS developments and applications.
Objectivesee above
252-3100-00LComputer Supported Cooperative Work Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 18.
2 credits2SM. Norrie
AbstractComputer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) is the study of how people work together using computer technology. It is a multi-disciplinary research field dealing with the social, theoretical, practical and technical aspects of collaboration and how the use of technology can affect groups, organisations and communities. The diversity of the CSCW field is reflected in the range of topics covered.
ObjectiveComputer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW) is the study of how people work together using computer technology. It is a multi-disciplinary research field dealing with the social, theoretical, practical and technical aspects of collaboration and how the use of technology can affect groups, organisations, communities and societies. The CSCW community is interested in how people use everyday tools such as email, the web and chat systems as well as specialist groupware applications that support groups of people engaged in shared tasks such as software development or product design. A better understanding of how people communicate and work together can in turn lead to a better understanding of the problems of current technologies and systems and influence the design of new technologies and tools.