Qiuting Huang: Katalogdaten im Frühjahrssemester 2018

NameHerr Prof. em. Dr. Qiuting Huang
LehrgebietElektronik
Adresse
Institut für Integrierte Systeme
ETH Zürich, ETZ J 95
Gloriastrasse 35
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telefon+41 44 632 52 40
Fax+41 44 632 15 17
E-Mailhuang@iis.ee.ethz.ch
DepartementInformationstechnologie und Elektrotechnik
BeziehungProfessor emeritus

NummerTitelECTSUmfangDozierende
227-0111-00LCommunication Electronics6 KP2V + 2UQ. Huang
KurzbeschreibungElectronics for communications systems, with emphasis on realization. Low noise amplifiers, modulators and demodulators, transmit amplifiers and oscillators are discussed in the context of wireless communications. Wireless receiver, transmitter and frequency synthesizer will be described. Importance of and trade offs among sensitivity, linearity and selectivity are discussed extensively.
LernzielFoundation course for understanding modern electronic circuits for communication applications. We learn how theoretical communications principles are reduced to practice using transistors, switches, inductors, capacitors and resistors. The harsh environment such communication electronics will be exposed to and the resulting requirements on the sensitivity, linearity and selectivity help explain the design trade offs encountered in every circuit block found in a modern transceiver.
InhaltAccounting for more than two trillion dollars per year, communications is one of the most important drivers for advanced economies of our time. Wired networks have been a key enabler to the internet age and the proliferation of search engines, social networks and electronic commerce, whereas wireless communications, cellular networks in particular, have liberated people and increased productivity in developed and developing nations alike. Integrated circuits that make such communications devices light weight and affordable have played a key role in the proliferation of communications.
This course introduces our students to the key components that realize the tangible products in electronic form. We begin with an introduction to wireless communications, and describe the harsh environment in which a transceiver has to work reliably. In this context we highlight the importance of sensitivity or low noise, linearity, selectivity, power consumption and cost, that are all vital to a competitive device in such applications.
We shall review bipolar and MOS devices from a designer's prospectives, before discussing basic amplifier structures - common emitter/source, common base/gate configurations, their noise performance and linearity, impedance matching, and many other things one needs to know about a low noise amplifier.
We will discuss modulation, and the mixer that enables its implementation. Noise and linearity form an inseparable part of the discussion of its design, but we also introduce the concept of quadrature demodulator, image rejection, and the effects of mismatch on performance.
When mixers are used as a modulator the signals they receive are usually large and the natural linearity of transistors becomes insufficient. The concept of feedback will be introduced and its function as an improver of linearity studied in detail.
Amplifiers in the transmit path are necessary to boost the power level before the signal leaves an integrated circuit to drive an even more powerful amplifier (PA) off chip. Linearized pre-amplifiers will be studied as part of the transmitter.
A crucial part of a mobile transceiver terminal is the generation of local oscillator signals at the desired frequencies that are required for modulation and demodulation. Oscillators will be studied, starting from stability criteria of an electronic system, then leading to criteria for controlled instability or oscillation. Oscillator design will be discussed in detail, including that of crystal controlled oscillators which provide accurate time base.
An introduction to phase-locked loops will be made, illustrating how it links a variable frequency oscillator to a very stable fixed frequency crystal oscillator, and how phase detector, charge pump and programmable dividers all serve to realize an agile frequency synthesizer that is very stable in each frequency synthesized.
SkriptScript with slides and notes is available.
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesThe course Analog Integrated Circuits is recommended as preparation for this course.
227-0146-00LAnalog-to-Digital Converters Information 6 KP2V + 2UQ. Huang, T. Burger
KurzbeschreibungThis course provides a thorough treatment of integrated data conversion systems from system level specifications and trade-offs, over architecture choice down to circuit implementation.
LernzielData conversion systems are substantial sub-parts of many electronic systems, e.g. the audio conversion system of a home-cinema systems or the base-band front-end of a wireless modem. Data conversion systems usually determine the performance of the overall system in terms of dynamic range and linearity. The student will learn to understand the basic principles behind data conversion and be introduced to the different methods and circuit architectures to implement such a conversion. The conversion methods such as successive approximation or algorithmic conversion are explained with their principle of operation accompanied with the appropriate mathematical calculations, including the effects of non-idealties in some cases. After successful completion of the course the student should understand the concept of an ideal ADC, know all major converter architectures, their principle of operation and what governs their performance.
Inhalt- Introduction: information representation and communication; abstraction, categorization and symbolic representation; basic conversion algorithms; data converter application; tradeoffs among key parameters; ADC taxonomy.
- Dual-slope & successive approximation register (SAR) converters: dual slope principle & converter; SAR ADC operating principle; SAR implementation with a capacitive array; range extension with segmented array.
- Algorithmic & pipelined A/D converters: algorithmic conversion principle; sample & hold stage; pipe-lined converter; multiplying DAC; flash sub-ADC and n-bit MDAC; redundancy for correction of non-idealties, error correction.
- Performance metrics and non-linearity: ideal ADC; offset, gain error, differential and integral non-linearities; capacitor mismatch; impact of capacitor mismatch on SAR ADC's performance.
- Flash, folding an interpolating analog-to-digital converters: flash ADC principle, thermometer to binary coding, sparkle correction; limitations of flash converters; the folding principle, residue extraction; folding amplifiers; cascaded folding; interpolation for folding converters; cascaded folding and interpolation.
- Noise in analog-to-digital converters: types of noise; noise calculation in electronic circuit, kT/C-noise, sampled noise; noise analysis in switched-capacitor circuits; aperture time uncertainty and sampling jitter.
- Delta-sigma A/D-converters: linearity and resolution; from delta-modulation to delta-sigma modulation; first-oder delta-sigma modulation, circuit level implementation; clock-jitter & SNR in delta-sigma modulators; second-order delta-sigma modulation, higher-order modulation, design procedure for a single-loop modulator.
- Digital-to-analog converters: introduction; current scaling D/A converter, current steering DAC, calibration for improved performance.
SkriptHandouts of the slides will be distributed.
Literatur- B. Razavi, Principles of Data Conversion System Design, IEEE Press, 1994
- M. Gustavsson et. al., CMOS Data Converters for Communications, Springer, 2010
- R.J. van de Plassche, CMOS Integrated Analog-to-Digital and Digital-to-Analog Converters, Springer, 2010
Voraussetzungen / BesonderesIt is highly recommended to attend the course "Analog Integrated Circuits" of Prof. Huang as a preparation for this course.