Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2020

Computer Science Master Information
Focus Courses
Focus Courses General Studies
Elective Focus Courses General Studies
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
263-4507-00LAdvances in Distributed Graph Algorithms
Does not take place this semester.
W6 credits3V + 1U + 1AM. Ghaffari
AbstractHow can a network of computers solve the graph problems needed for running that network?
ObjectiveThis course will familiarize the students with the algorithmic tools and techniques in local distributed graph algorithms, and overview the recent highlights in the field. This will also prepare the students for independent research at the frontier of this area.

This is a special‐topics course in algorithm design. It should be accessible to any student with sufficient theoretical/algorithmic background. In particular, it assumes no familiarity with distributed computing. We only expect that the students are comfortable with the basics of algorithm design and analysis, as well as probability theory. It is possible to take this course simultaneously with the course “Principles of Distributed Computing”. If you are not sure whether you are ready for this class or not, please consult the instructor.
ContentHow can a network of computers solve the graph problems needed for running that network?

Answering this and similar questions is the underlying motivation of the area of Distributed Graph Algorithms. The area focuses on the foundational algorithmic aspects in these questions and provides methods for various distributed systems --- e.g., the Internet, a wireless network, a multi-processor computer, etc --- to solve computational problems that can be abstracted as graph problems. For instance, think about shortest path computation in routing, or about coloring and independent set computation in contention resolution.

Over the past decade, we have witnessed a renaissance in the area of Distributed Graph Algorithms, with tremendous progress in many directions and solutions for a number of decades-old central problems. This course overviews the highlights of these results. The course will mainly focus on one half of the field, which revolves around locality and local problems. The other half, which relates to the issue of congestion and dealing with limited bandwidth in global problems, will not be addressed in this offering of the course.

The course will cover a sampling of the recent developments (and open questions) at the frontier of research of distributed graph algorithms. The material will be based on a compilation of recent papers in this area, which will be provided throughout the semester. The tentative list of topics includes:
- The shattering technique for local graph problems and its necessity
- Lovasz Local Lemma algorithms, their distributed variants, and distributed applications
- Distributed Derandomization
- Distributed Lower bounds
- Graph Coloring
- Complexity Hierarchy and Gaps
- Primal-Dual Techniques
Prerequisites / NoticeThe class assumes no knowledge in distributed algorithms/computing. Our only prerequisite is the undergraduate class Algorithms, Probability, and Computing (APC) or any other course that can be seen as the equivalent. In particular, much of what we will discuss uses randomized algorithms and therefore, we will assume that the students are familiar with the tools and techniques in randomized algorithms and analysis (to the extent covered in the APC class).
263-4600-00LFormal Methods for Information Security Information W5 credits2V + 1U + 1AR. Sasse, C. Sprenger
AbstractThe course focuses on formal methods for the modelling and analysis of security protocols for critical systems, ranging from authentication protocols for network security to electronic voting protocols and online banking.
ObjectiveThe students will learn the key ideas and theoretical foundations of formal modelling and analysis of security protocols. The students will complement their theoretical knowledge by solving practical exercises, completing a small project, and using state-of-the-art tools.
ContentThe course treats formal methods mainly for the modelling and analysis of security protocols. Cryptographic protocols (such as SSL/TLS, SSH, Kerberos, SAML single-sign on, and IPSec) form the basis for secure communication and business processes. Numerous attacks on published protocols show that the design of cryptographic protocols is extremely error-prone. A rigorous analysis of these protocols is therefore indispensable, and manual analysis is insufficient. The lectures cover the theoretical basis for the (tool-supported) formal modeling and analysis of such protocols. Specifically, we discuss their operational semantics, the formalization of security properties, and techniques and algorithms for their verification.

In addition to the classical security properties for confidentiality and authentication, we will study strong secrecy and privacy properties. We will discuss electronic voting protocols, and RFID protocols (a staple of the Internet of Things), where these properties are central. The accompanying tutorials provide an opportunity to apply the theory and tools to concrete protocols. Moreover, we will discuss methods to abstract and refine security protocols and the link between symbolic protocol models and cryptographic models.

Furthermore, we will also present a security notion for general systems based on non-interference as well as language-based information flow security where non-interference is enforced via a type system.
263-4400-00LAdvanced Graph Algorithms and Optimization Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W5 credits3G + 1AR. Kyng
AbstractThis course will cover a number of advanced topics in optimization and graph algorithms.
ObjectiveThe course will take students on a deep dive into modern approaches to
graph algorithms using convex optimization techniques.

By studying convex optimization through the lens of graph algorithms,
students should develop a deeper understanding of fundamental
phenomena in optimization.

The course will cover some traditional discrete approaches to various graph
problems, especially flow problems, and then contrast these approaches
with modern, asymptotically faster methods based on combining convex
optimization with spectral and combinatorial graph theory.
ContentStudents should leave the course understanding key
concepts in optimization such as first and second-order optimization,
convex duality, multiplicative weights and dual-based methods,
acceleration, preconditioning, and non-Euclidean optimization.

Students will also be familiarized with central techniques in the
development of graph algorithms in the past 15 years, including graph
decomposition techniques, sparsification, oblivious routing, and
spectral and combinatorial preconditioning.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is targeted toward masters and doctoral students with an
interest in theoretical computer science.

Students should be comfortable with design and analysis of algorithms, probability, and linear algebra.

Having passed the course Algorithms, Probability, and Computing (APC) is highly recommended, but not formally required. If you are not
sure whether you're ready for this class or not, please consult the
instructor.
263-4656-00LDigital Signatures Information W4 credits2V + 1AD. Hofheinz
AbstractDigital signatures as one central cryptographic building block. Different security goals and security definitions for digital signatures, followed by a variety of popular and fundamental signature schemes with their security analyses.
ObjectiveThe student knows a variety of techniques to construct and analyze the security of digital signature schemes. This includes modularity as a central tool of constructing secure schemes, and reductions as a central tool to proving the security of schemes.
ContentWe will start with several definitions of security for signature schemes, and investigate the relations among them. We will proceed to generic (but inefficient) constructions of secure signatures, and then move on to a number of efficient schemes based on concrete computational hardness assumptions. On the way, we will get to know paradigms such as hash-then-sign, one-time signatures, and chameleon hashing as central tools to construct secure signatures.
LiteratureJonathan Katz, "Digital Signatures."
Prerequisites / NoticeIdeally, students will have taken the D-INFK Bachelors course "Information Security" or an equivalent course at Bachelors level.
263-5300-00LGuarantees for Machine Learning Information Restricted registration - show details W5 credits2V + 2AF. Yang
AbstractThis course teaches classical and recent methods in statistics and optimization commonly used to prove theoretical guarantees for machine learning algorithms. The knowledge is then applied in project work that focuses on understanding phenomena in modern machine learning.
ObjectiveThis course is aimed at advanced master and doctorate students who want to understand and/or conduct independent research on theory for modern machine learning. For this purpose, students will learn common mathematical techniques from statistical learning theory. In independent project work, they then apply their knowledge and go through the process of critically questioning recently published work, finding relevant research questions and learning how to effectively present research ideas to a professional audience.
ContentThis course teaches some classical and recent methods in statistical learning theory aimed at proving theoretical guarantees for machine learning algorithms, including topics in

- concentration bounds, uniform convergence
- high-dimensional statistics (e.g. Lasso)
- prediction error bounds for non-parametric statistics (e.g. in kernel spaces)
- minimax lower bounds
- regularization via optimization

The project work focuses on active theoretical ML research that aims to understand modern phenomena in machine learning, including but not limited to

- how overparameterization could help generalization ( interpolating models, linearized NN )
- how overparameterization could help optimization ( non-convex optimization, loss landscape )
- complexity measures and approximation theoretic properties of randomly initialized and
trained NN
- generalization of robust learning ( adversarial robustness, standard and robust error tradeoff )
- prediction with calibrated confidence ( conformal prediction, calibration )
Prerequisites / NoticeIt’s absolutely necessary for students to have a strong mathematical background (basic real analysis, probability theory, linear algebra) and good knowledge of core concepts in machine learning taught in courses such as “Introduction to Machine Learning”, “Regression”/ “Statistical Modelling”. It's also helpful to have heard an optimization course or approximation theoretic course. In addition to these prerequisites, this class requires a certain degree of mathematical maturity—including abstract thinking and the ability to understand and write proofs.
263-5806-00LComputational Models of Motion for Character Animation and Robotics Information W6 credits2V + 2U + 1AS. Coros, M. Bächer, B. Thomaszewski
AbstractThis course covers fundamentals of physics-based modelling and numerical optimization from the perspective of character animation and robotics applications. The methods discussed in class derive their theoretical underpinnings from applied mathematics, control theory and computational mechanics, and they will be richly illustrated using examples ranging from locomotion controllers and crowd simula
ObjectiveStudents will learn how to represent, model and algorithmically control the behavior of animated characters and real-life robots. The lectures are accompanied by programming assignments (written in C++) and a capstone project.
ContentOptimal control and trajectory optimization; multibody systems; kinematics; forward and inverse dynamics; constrained and unconstrained numerical optimization; mass-spring models for crowd simulation; FEM; compliant systems; sim-to-real; robotic manipulation of elastically-deforming objects.
Prerequisites / NoticeExperience with C++ programming, numerical linear algebra and multivariate calculus. Some background in physics-based modeling, kinematics and dynamics is helpful, but not necessary.
272-0300-00LAlgorithmics for Hard Problems Information
Does not take place this semester.
This course d o e s n o t include the Mentored Work Specialised Courses with an Educational Focus in Computer Science A.
W5 credits2V + 1U + 1A
AbstractThis course unit looks into algorithmic approaches to the solving of hard problems, particularly with moderately exponential-time algorithms and parameterized algorithms.

The seminar is accompanied by a comprehensive reflection upon the significance of the approaches presented for computer science tuition at high schools.
ObjectiveTo systematically acquire an overview of the methods for solving hard problems. To get deeper knowledge of exact and parameterized algorithms.
ContentFirst, the concept of hardness of computation is introduced (repeated for the computer science students). Then some methods for solving hard problems are treated in a systematic way. For each algorithm design method, it is discussed what guarantees it can give and how we pay for the improved efficiency. A special focus lies on moderately exponential-time algorithms and parameterized algorithms.
Lecture notesUnterlagen und Folien werden zur Verfügung gestellt.
LiteratureJ. Hromkovic: Algorithmics for Hard Problems, Springer 2004.

R. Niedermeier: Invitation to Fixed-Parameter Algorithms, 2006.

M. Cygan et al.: Parameterized Algorithms, 2015.

F. Fomin, D. Kratsch: Exact Exponential Algorithms, 2010.
272-0302-00LApproximation and Online Algorithms Information W5 credits2V + 1U + 1AH.‑J. Böckenhauer, D. Komm
AbstractThis lecture deals with approximative algorithms for hard optimization problems and algorithmic approaches for solving online problems as well as the limits of these approaches.
ObjectiveGet a systematic overview of different methods for designing approximative algorithms for hard optimization problems and online problems. Get to know methods for showing the limitations of these approaches.
ContentApproximation algorithms are one of the most succesful techniques to attack hard optimization problems. Here, we study the so-called approximation ratio, i.e., the ratio of the cost of the computed approximating solution and an optimal one (which is not computable efficiently).
For an online problem, the whole instance is not known in advance, but it arrives pieceweise and for every such piece a corresponding part of the definite output must be given. The quality of an algorithm for such an online problem is measured by the competitive ratio, i.e., the ratio of the cost of the computed solution and the cost of an optimal solution that could be given if the whole input was known in advance.

The contents of this lecture are
- the classification of optimization problems by the reachable approximation ratio,
- systematic methods to design approximation algorithms (e.g., greedy strategies, dynamic programming, linear programming relaxation),
- methods to show non-approximability,
- classic online problem like paging or scheduling problems and corresponding algorithms,
- randomized online algorithms,
- the design and analysis principles for online algorithms, and
- limits of the competitive ratio and the advice complexity as a way to do a deeper analysis of the complexity of online problems.
LiteratureThe lecture is based on the following books:

J. Hromkovic: Algorithmics for Hard Problems, Springer, 2004

D. Komm: An Introduction to Online Computation: Determinism, Randomization, Advice, Springer, 2016

Additional literature:

A. Borodin, R. El-Yaniv: Online Computation and Competitive Analysis, Cambridge University Press, 1998
401-3052-05LGraph Theory Information W5 credits2V + 1UB. Sudakov
AbstractBasic notions, trees, spanning trees, Caley's formula, vertex and edge connectivity, 2-connectivity, Mader's theorem, Menger's theorem, Eulerian graphs, Hamilton cycles, Dirac's theorem, matchings, theorems of Hall, König and Tutte, planar graphs, Euler's formula, basic non-planar graphs, graph colorings, greedy colorings, Brooks' theorem, 5-colorings of planar graphs
ObjectiveThe students will get an overview over the most fundamental questions concerning graph theory. We expect them to understand the proof techniques and to use them autonomously on related problems.
Lecture notesLecture will be only at the blackboard.
LiteratureWest, D.: "Introduction to Graph Theory"
Diestel, R.: "Graph Theory"

Further literature links will be provided in the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are expected to have a mathematical background and should be able to write rigorous proofs.


NOTICE: This course unit was previously offered as 252-1408-00L Graphs and Algorithms.
401-3903-11LGeometric Integer ProgrammingW6 credits2V + 1UJ. Paat
AbstractInteger programming is the task of minimizing a linear function over all the integer points in a polyhedron. This lecture introduces the key concepts of an algorithmic theory for solving such problems.
ObjectiveThe purpose of the lecture is to provide a geometric treatment of the theory of integer optimization.
ContentKey topics are:

- Lattice theory and the polynomial time solvability of integer optimization problems in fixed dimension.

- Structural properties of integer sets that reveal other parameters affecting the complexity of integer problems

- Duality theory for integer optimization problems from the vantage point of lattice free sets.
Lecture notesnot available, blackboard presentation
LiteratureLecture notes will be provided.

Other helpful materials include

Bertsimas, Weismantel: Optimization over Integers, 2005

and

Schrijver: Theory of linear and integer programming, 1986.
Prerequisites / Notice"Mathematical Optimization" (401-3901-00L)
227-0560-00LDeep Learning for Autonomous Driving Information Restricted registration - show details
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to 80 students.
Preference is given to EEIT, INF and RSC students.
W6 credits3V + 2PD. Dai, A. Liniger
AbstractAutonomous driving has moved from the realm of science fiction to a very real possibility during the past twenty years, largely due to rapid developments of deep learning approaches, automotive sensors, and microprocessor capacity. This course covers the core techniques required for building a self-driving car, especially the practical use of deep learning through this theme.
ObjectiveStudents will learn about the fundamental aspects of a self-driving car. They will also learn to use modern automotive sensors and HD navigational maps, and to implement, train and debug their own deep neural networks in order to gain a deep understanding of cutting-edge research in autonomous driving tasks, including perception, localization and control.

After attending this course, students will:
1) understand the core technologies of building a self-driving car;
2) have a good overview over the current state of the art in self-driving cars;
3) be able to critically analyze and evaluate current research in this area;
4) be able to implement basic systems for multiple autonomous driving tasks.
ContentWe will focus on teaching the following topics centered on autonomous driving: deep learning, automotive sensors, multimodal driving datasets, road scene perception, ego-vehicle localization, path planning, and control.

The course covers the following main areas:

I) Foundation
a) Fundamentals of a self-driving car
b) Fundamentals of deep-learning


II) Perception
a) Semantic segmentation and lane detection
b) Depth estimation with images and sparse LiDAR data
c) 3D object detection with images and LiDAR data
d) Object tracking and motion prediction

III) Localization
a) GPS-based and Vision-based Localization
b) Visual Odometry and Lidar Odometry

IV) Path Planning and Control
a) Path planning for autonomous driving
b) Motion planning and vehicle control
c) Imitation learning and reinforcement learning for self driving cars

The exercise projects will involve training complex neural networks and applying them on real-world, multimodal driving datasets. In particular, students should be able to develop systems that deal with the following problems:
- Sensor calibration and synchronization to obtain multimodal driving data;
- Semantic segmentation and depth estimation with deep neural networks ;
- Learning to drive with images and map data directly (a.k.a. end-to-end driving)
Lecture notesThe lecture slides will be provided as a PDF.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis is an advanced grad-level course. Students must have taken courses on machine learning and computer vision or have acquired equivalent knowledge. Students are expected to have a solid mathematical foundation, in particular in linear algebra, multivariate calculus, and probability. All practical exercises will require basic knowledge of Python and will use libraries such as PyTorch, scikit-learn and scikit-image.
227-1034-00LComputational Vision (University of Zurich)
No enrolment to this course at ETH Zurich. Book the corresponding module directly at UZH.
UZH Module Code: INI402

Mind the enrolment deadlines at UZH:
https://www.uzh.ch/cmsssl/en/studies/application/mobilitaet.html
W6 credits2V + 1UD. Kiper
AbstractThis course focuses on neural computations that underlie visual perception. We study how visual signals are processed in the retina, LGN and visual cortex. We study the morpholgy and functional architecture of cortical circuits responsible for pattern, motion, color, and three-dimensional vision.
ObjectiveThis course considers the operation of circuits in the process of neural computations. The evolution of neural systems will be considered to demonstrate how neural structures and mechanisms are optimised for energy capture, transduction, transmission and representation of information. Canonical brain circuits will be described as models for the analysis of sensory information. The concept of receptive fields will be introduced and their role in coding spatial and temporal information will be considered. The constraints of the bandwidth of neural channels and the mechanisms of normalization by neural circuits will be discussed.
The visual system will form the basis of case studies in the computation of form, depth, and motion. The role of multiple channels and collective computations for object recognition will
be considered. Coordinate transformations of space and time by cortical and subcortical mechanisms will be analysed. The means by which sensory and motor systems are integrated to allow for adaptive behaviour will be considered.
ContentThis course considers the operation of circuits in the process of neural computations. The evolution of neural systems will be considered to demonstrate how neural structures and mechanisms are optimised for energy capture, transduction, transmission and representation of information. Canonical brain circuits will be described as models for the analysis of sensory information. The concept of receptive fields will be introduced and their role in coding spatial and temporal information will be considered. The constraints of the bandwidth of neural channels and the mechanisms of normalization by neural circuits will be discussed.
The visual system will form the basis of case studies in the computation of form, depth, and motion. The role of multiple channels and collective computations for object recognition will
be considered. Coordinate transformations of space and time by cortical and subcortical mechanisms will be analysed. The means by which sensory and motor systems are integrated to allow for adaptive behaviour will be considered.
LiteratureBooks: (recommended references, not required)
1. An Introduction to Natural Computation, D. Ballard (Bradford Books, MIT Press) 1997.
2. The Handbook of Brain Theorie and Neural Networks, M. Arbib (editor), (MIT Press) 1995.
Seminar in General Studies
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
252-3002-00LAlgorithms for Database Systems Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
W2 credits2SP. Penna
AbstractQuery processing, optimization, stream-based systems, distributed and parallel databases, non-standard databases.
ObjectiveDevelop an understanding of selected problems of current interest in the area of algorithms for database systems.
252-4102-00LSeminar on Randomized Algorithms and Probabilistic Methods Restricted registration - show details
The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.

Number of participants limited to 24.
W2 credits2SA. Steger
AbstractThe aim of the seminar is to study papers which bring the students to the forefront of today's research topics. This semester we will study selected papers of the conference Symposium on Discrete Algorithms (SODA18).
ObjectiveRead papers from the forefront of today's research; learn how to give a scientific talk.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe seminar is open for both students from mathematics and students from computer science. As prerequisite we require that you passed the course Randomized Algorithms and Probabilistic Methods (or equivalent, if you come from abroad).
252-5704-00LAdvanced Methods in Computer Graphics Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 24.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
W2 credits2SO. Sorkine Hornung
AbstractThis seminar covers advanced topics in computer graphics with a focus on the latest research results. Topics include modeling, rendering, visualization,
animation, physical simulation, computational photography, and others.
ObjectiveThe goal is to obtain an in-depth understanding of actual problems and
research topics in the field of computer graphics as well as improve
presentation and critical analysis skills.
261-5113-00LComputational Challenges in Medical Genomics Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20.
W2 credits2SA. Kahles, G. Rätsch
AbstractThis seminar discusses recent relevant contributions to the fields of computational genomics, algorithmic bioinformatics, statistical genetics and related areas. Each participant will hold a presentation and lead the subsequent discussion.
ObjectivePreparing and holding a scientific presentation in front of peers is a central part of working in the scientific domain. In this seminar, the participants will learn how to efficiently summarize the relevant parts of a scientific publication, critically reflect its contents, and summarize it for presentation to an audience. The necessary skills to succesfully present the key points of existing research work are the same as needed to communicate own research ideas.
In addition to holding a presentation, each student will both contribute to as well as lead a discussion section on the topics presented in the class.
ContentThe topics covered in the seminar are related to recent computational challenges that arise from the fields of genomics and biomedicine, including but not limited to genomic variant interpretation, genomic sequence analysis, compressive genomics tasks, single-cell approaches, privacy considerations, statistical frameworks, etc.
Both recently published works contributing novel ideas to the areas mentioned above as well as seminal contributions from the past are amongst the list of selected papers.
Prerequisites / NoticeKnowledge of algorithms and data structures and interest in applications in genomics and computational biomedicine.
263-3712-00LSeminar on Computational Interaction Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 14.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
W2 credits2SO. Hilliges
AbstractComputational Interaction focuses on the use of algorithms to enhance the interaction with a computing system. Papers from scientific venues such as CHI, UIST & SIGGRAPH will be examined in-depth. Student present and discuss the papers to extract techniques and insights that can be applied to software & hardware projects. Topics include user modeling, computational design, and input & output.
ObjectiveThe goal of the seminar is to familiarize students with exciting new research topics in this important area, but also to teach basic scientific writing and oral presentation skills.
ContentThe seminar will have a different structure from regular seminars to encourage more discussion and a deeper learning experience. We will use a case-study format where all students read the same paper each week but fulfill different roles and hence prepare with different viewpoints in mind (e.g. "presenter", "historian", "student", etc).

The seminar will cover multiple topics of computational interaction, including:
1) User- and context modeling for UI adaptation
Intent modeling, activity and emotion recognition, and user perception.

2) Computational design
Design mining, design exploration, UI optimization.

3) Computer supported input
Text entry, pointing, gestural input, physiological sensing, eye tracking, and sketching.

4) Computer supported output
Information retrieval, fabrication, mixed reality interfaces, haptics, and gaze contingency

For each topic, a paper will be chosen that represents the state of the art of research or seminal work that inspired and fostered future work. Student will learn how to incorporate computational methods into system that involve software, hardware, and, very importantly, users.

Seminar website: https://ait.ethz.ch/teaching/courses/2020-SS-Seminar-Computational-Interaction/
263-4203-00LGeometry: Combinatorics and Algorithms Information
The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
W2 credits2SB. Gärtner, M. Hoffmann, E. Welzl, M. Wettstein
AbstractThis seminar complements the course Geometry: Combinatorics & Algorithms. Students of the seminar will present original research papers, some classic and some of them very recent.
ObjectiveEach student is expected to read, understand, and elaborate on a selected research paper. To this end, (s)he should give a 45-min. presentation about the paper. The process includes

* getting an overview of the related literature;
* understanding and working out the background/motivation:
why and where are the questions addressed relevant?
* understanding the contents of the paper in all details;
* selecting parts suitable for the presentation;
* presenting the selected parts in such a way that an audience
with some basic background in geometry and graph theory can easily understand and appreciate it.
ContentThis seminar is held once a year and complements the course Geometry: Combinatorics & Algorithms. Students of the seminar will present original research papers, some classic and some of them very recent. The seminar is a good preparation for a master, diploma, or semester thesis in the area.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite: Successful participation in the course "Geometry: Combinatorics & Algorithms" (takes place every HS) is required.
263-2100-00LResearch Topics in Software Engineering Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 22.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
W2 credits2SZ. Su, P. He, M. Rigger, T. Su
AbstractThis seminar is an opportunity to become familiar with current research in software engineering and more generally with the methods and challenges of scientific research.
ObjectiveEach student will be asked to study some papers from the recent software engineering literature and review them. This is an exercise in critical review and analysis. Active participation is required (a presentation of a paper as well as participation in discussions).
ContentThe aim of this seminar is to introduce students to recent research results in the area of programming languages and software engineering. To accomplish that, students will study and present research papers in the area as well as participate in paper discussions. The papers will span topics in both theory and practice, including papers on program verification, program analysis, testing, programming language design, and development tools.
LiteratureThe publications to be presented will be announced on the seminar home page at least one week before the first session.
Prerequisites / NoticePapers will be distributed during the first lecture.
263-2211-00LSeminar in Computer Architecture Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 22.

The deadline for deregistering expires at the end of the second week of the semester. Students who are still registered after that date, but do not attend the seminar, will officially fail the seminar.
W2 credits2SO. Mutlu, M. H. K. Alser, J. Gómez Luna
AbstractThis seminar course covers fundamental and cutting-edge research papers in computer architecture. It has multiple components that are aimed at improving students' (1) technical skills in computer architecture, (2) critical thinking and analysis abilities on computer architecture concepts, as well as (3) technical presentation of concepts and papers in both spoken and written forms.
ObjectiveThe main objective is to learn how to rigorously analyze and present papers and ideas on computer architecture. We will have rigorous presentation and discussion of selected papers during lectures and a written report delivered by each student at the end of the semester.

This course is for those interested in computer architecture. Registered students are expected to attend every meeting, participate in the discussion, and create a synthesis report at the end of the course.
ContentTopics will center around computer architecture. We will, for example, discuss papers on hardware security; accelerators for key applications like machine learning, graph processing and bioinformatics; memory systems; interconnects; processing in memory; various fundamental and emerging paradigms in computer architecture; hardware/software co-design and cooperation; fault tolerance; energy efficiency; heterogeneous and parallel systems; new execution models; predictable computing, etc.
Lecture notesAll materials will be posted on the course website: https://safari.ethz.ch/architecture_seminar/
Past course materials, including the synthesis report assignment, can be found in the Fall 2019 website for the course: https://safari.ethz.ch/architecture_seminar/fall2019/doku.php
LiteratureKey papers and articles, on both fundamentals and cutting-edge topics in computer architecture will be provided and discussed. These will be posted on the course website.
Prerequisites / NoticeDesign of Digital Circuits.
Students should (1) have done very well in Design of Digital Circuits and (2) show a genuine interest in Computer Architecture.
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