Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Mechanical Engineering Master Information
Core Courses
Energy, Flows and Processes
The courses listed in this category “Core Courses” are recommended. Alternative courses can be chosen in agreement with the tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-0060-00LThermodynamics and Transport Phenomena in NanotechnologyW4 credits2V + 2UT. Schutzius, D. Taylor
AbstractThe lecture deals with thermodynamics and transport phenomena in nano- and microscale systems. Typical areas of applications are microelectronics manufacturing and cooling, manufacturing of novel materials and coatings, surface technologies, wetting phenomena and related technologies, and micro- and nanosystems and devices.
ObjectiveThe student will acquire fundamental knowledge of interfacial and micro-nanoscale thermofluidics including electric field and light interaction with surfaces. Furthermore, the student will be exposed to a host of applications ranging from superhydrophobic surfaces and microelectronics cooling to solar energy, all of which will be discussed in the context of the course. The student will also judge state-of-the-art scientific research in these areas.
ContentThermodynamic aspects of intermolecular forces; Interfacial phenomena; Surface tension; Wettability and contact angle; Wettability of Micro/Nanoscale textured surfaces: superhydrophobicity and superhydrophilicity.

Physics of micro- and nanofluidics as well as heat and mass transport phenomena at the nanoscale.

Scientific communication and exposure to state-of-the-art scientific research in the areas of Nanotechnology and the Water-Energy Nexus.
Lecture notesyes
151-0106-00LOrbital DynamicsW4 credits3GA. A. Kubik
AbstractPrinciples of the motion of natural and artificial satellites, rocket dynamics, orbital maneuvers and interplanetary missions.
ObjectiveKnowledge of the basic theory of satellite dynamics. Ability to apply the acquired theory to simple examples.
ContentThe two-body problem, rocket dynamics, orbital maneuvers, interplanetary missions, the restricted three-body problem, perturbation equations, satellite attitude dynamics.
151-0110-00LCompressible FlowsW4 credits2V + 1UT. Rösgen
AbstractTopics: unsteady one-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows, acoustics, sound propagation, supersonic flows with shocks and Prandtl-Meyer expansions, flow around slender bodies, shock tubes, reaction fronts (deflagration and detonation).
Mathematical tools: method of characteristics and selected numerical methods.
ObjectiveIllustration of compressible flow phenomena and introduction to the corresponding mathematical description methods.
ContentThe interaction of compressibility and inertia is responsible for wave generation in a fluid. The compressibility plays an important role for example in unsteady phenomena, such as oscillations in gas pipelines or exhaust pipes. Compressibility effects are also important in steady subsonic flows with high Mach numbers (M>0.3) and in supersonic flows (e.g. aeronautics, turbomachinery).
The first part of the lecture deals with wave propagation phenomena in one-dimensional subsonic and supersonic flows. The discussion includes waves with small amplitudes in an acoustic approximation and waves with large amplitudes with possible shock formation.
The second part deals with plane, steady supersonic flows. Slender bodies in a parallel flow are considered as small perturbations of the flow and can be treated by means of acoustic methods. The description of the two-dimensional supersonic flow around bodies with arbitrary shapes includes oblique shocks and Prandtl-Meyer expansions etc.. Various boundary conditions, which are imposed for example by walls or free-jet boundaries, and interactions, reflections etc. are taken into account.
Lecture notesnot available
Literaturea list of recommended textbooks is handed out at the beginning of the lecture.
Prerequisites / Noticeprerequisites: Fluiddynamics I and II
151-0116-10LHigh Performance Computing for Science and Engineering (HPCSE) for Engineers II Information W4 credits4GP. Koumoutsakos, S. M. Martin
AbstractThis course focuses on programming methods and tools for parallel computing on multi and many-core architectures. Emphasis will be placed on practical and computational aspects of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation including the implementation of relevant algorithms on HPC architectures.
ObjectiveThe course will teach
- programming models and tools for multi and many-core architectures
- fundamental concepts of Uncertainty Quantification and Propagation (UQ+P) for computational models of systems in Engineering and Life Sciences
ContentHigh Performance Computing:
- Advanced topics in shared-memory programming
- Advanced topics in MPI
- GPU architectures and CUDA programming

Uncertainty Quantification:
- Uncertainty quantification under parametric and non-parametric modeling uncertainty
- Bayesian inference with model class assessment
- Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation
Lecture noteshttps://www.cse-lab.ethz.ch/teaching/hpcse-ii_fs21/
Class notes, handouts
Literature- Class notes
- Introduction to High Performance Computing for Scientists and Engineers, G. Hager and G. Wellein
- CUDA by example, J. Sanders and E. Kandrot
- Data Analysis: A Bayesian Tutorial, D. Sivia and J. Skilling
- An introduction to Bayesian Analysis - Theory and Methods, J. Gosh, N. Delampady and S. Tapas
- Bayesian Data Analysis, A. Gelman, J. Carlin, H. Stern, D. Dunson, A. Vehtari and D. Rubin
- Machine Learning: A Bayesian and Optimization Perspective, S. Theodorides
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents must be familiar with the content of High Performance Computing for Science and Engineering I (151-0107-20L)
151-0156-00LSafety of Nuclear Power Plants Information W4 credits2V + 1UH.‑M. Prasser, V. Dang, L. Podofillini
AbstractKnowledge about safety concepts and requirements of nuclear power plants and their implementation in deterministic safety concepts and safety systems. Knowledge about behavior under accident conditions and about the methods of probabilistic risk analysis and how to handle results. Introduction into key elements of the enhanced safety of nuclear systems for the future.
ObjectiveDeep understanding of safety requirements, concepts and system of nuclear power plants, knowledge of deterministic and probabilistic methods for safety analysis, aspects of nuclear safety research, licensing of nuclear power plant operation. Overview on key elements of the enhanced safety of nuclear systems for the future.
Content(1) Introduction into the specific safety issues of nuclear power plants, main facts of health effects of ionizing radiation, defense in depth approach. (2) Reactor protection and reactivity control, reactivity induced accidents (RIA). (3) Loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA), emergency core cooling systems. (4) Short introduction into severe accidents (Beyond Design Base Accidents, BDBA). (5) Probabilistic risk analysis (PRA level 1,2,3). (6) Passive safety systems. (7) Safety of innovative reactor concepts.
Lecture notesScript:
Hand-outs of lecture slides will be distributed
Audio recording of lectures will be provided
Script "Short introduction into basics of nuclear power"
LiteratureS. Glasston & A. Sesonke: Nuclear Reactor Engineering, Reactor System Engineering, Ed. 4, Vol. 2., Chapman & Hall, NY, 1994
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Recommended in advance (not binding): 151-0163-00L Nuclear Energy Conversion
151-0160-00LNuclear Energy SystemsW4 credits2V + 1UH.‑M. Prasser, P. Burgherr, I. Günther-Leopold, W. Hummel, T. Kämpfer, T. Kober, X. Zhang
AbstractNuclear energy and sustainability, uranium production, uranium enrichment, nuclear fuel production, reprocessing of spent fuel, nuclear waste disposal, Life Cycle Analysis, energy and materials balance of Nuclear Power Plants.
ObjectiveStudents get an overview on the physical and chemical fundamentals, the technological processes and the environmental impact of the full energy conversion chain of nuclear power generation. The are enabled to assess to potentials and risks arising from embedding nuclear power in a complex energy system.
Content(1) survey on the cosmic and geological origin of uranium, methods of uranium mining, separation of uranium from the ore, (2) enrichment of uranium (diffusion cells, ultra-centrifuges, alternative methods), chemical conversion uranium oxid - fluorid - oxid, fuel rod fabrication processes, (3) fuel reprocessing (hydrochemical, pyrochemical) including modern developments of deep partitioning as well as methods to treat and minimize the amount and radiotoxicity of nuclear waste. (4) nuclear waste disposal, waste categories and origin, geological and engineered barriers in deep geological repositories, the project of a deep geological disposal for radioactive waste in Switzerland, (5) methods to measure the sustainability of energy systems, comparison of nuclear energy with other energy sources, environmental impact of the nuclear energy system as a whole, including the question of CO2 emissions, CO2 reduction costs, radioactive releases from the power plant, the fuel chain and the final disposal. The material balance of different fuel cycles with thermal and fast reactors isdiscussed.
Lecture notesLecture slides will be distributed as handouts and in digital form
151-0166-00LPhysics of Nuclear Reactor IIW4 credits3GK. Mikityuk, A. Pautz, S. Pelloni
AbstractReactor physics calculations for assessing the performance and safety of nuclear power plants are, in practice, carried out using large computer codes simulating different key phenomena. This course provides a basis for understanding state-of-the-art calculational methodologies in the above context.
ObjectiveStudents are introduced to advanced methods of reactor physics analysis for nuclear power plants.
ContentCross-sections preparation. Slowing down theory. Differential form of the neutron transport equation and method of discrete ordinates (Sn). Integral form of the neutron transport equation and method of characteristics. Method of Monte-Carlo. Modeling of fuel depletion. Lattice calculations and cross-section parametrization. Modeling of full core neutronics using nodal methods. Modeling of feedbacks from fuel behavior and thermal hydraulics. Point and spatial reactor kinetics. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis.
Lecture notesHand-outs will be provided on the website.
LiteratureChapters from various text books on Reactor Theory, etc.
151-0170-00LComputational Multiphase Thermal Fluid DynamicsW4 credits2V + 1UF. Coletti, A. Dehbi, Y. Sato
AbstractThe course deals with fundamentals of the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics to gas-liquid flows as well as particle laden gas flows including aerosols. The course will present the current state of art in the field. Challenging examples, mainly from the fluid-machinery and plant, are discussed in detail.
ObjectiveFundamentals of 3D multiphase flows (Definitions, Averages, Flow regimes), mathematical models (two-fluid model, Euler-Euler and Euler-Lagrange techniques), modeling of dispersed bubble flows (inter-phase forces, population balance and multi-bubble size class models), turbulence modeling, stratified and free-surface flows (interface tracking techniques such as VOF, level-sets and variants, modeling of surface tension), particulate and aerosol flows, particle tracking, one and two way coupling, random walk techniques to couple particle tracking with turbulence models, numerical methods and tools, industrial applications.
151-0212-00LAdvanced CFD MethodsW4 credits2V + 1UP. Jenny
AbstractFundamental and advanced numerical methods used in commercial and open-source CFD codes will be explained. The main focus is on numerical methods for conservation laws with discontinuities, which is relevant for trans- and hypersonic gas dynamics problems, but also CFD of incompressible flows, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo and the Lattice Boltzmann method are explained.
ObjectiveKnowing what's behind a state-of-the-art CFD code is not only important for developers, but also for users in order to choose the right methods and to achieve meaningful and accurate numerical results. Acquiring this knowledge is the main goal of this course.

Established numerical methods to solve the incompressible and compressible Navier-Stokes equations are explained, whereas the focus lies on finite volume methods for compressible flow simulations. In that context, first the main theory and then numerical schemes related to hyperbolic conservation laws are explained, whereas not only examples from fluid mechanics, but also simpler, yet illustrative ones are considered (e.g. Burgers and traffic flow equations). In addition, two less commonly used yet powerful approaches, i.e., the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) and Lattice Boltzmann methods, are introduced.

For most exercises a C++ code will have to be modified and applied.
Content- Finite-difference vs. finite-element vs. finite-volume methods
- Basic approach to simulate incompressible flows
- Brief introduction to turbulence modeling
- Theory and numerical methods for compressible flow simulations
- Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC)
- Lattice Boltzmann method
Lecture notesPart of the course is based on the referenced books. In addition, the participants receive a manuscript and the slides.
Literature"Computational Fluid Dynamics" by H. K. Versteeg and W. Malalasekera.
"Finite Volume Methods for Hyperbolic Problems" by R. J. Leveque.
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic knowledge in
- fluid dynamics
- numerical mathematics
- programming (programming language is not important, but C++ is of advantage)
151-0224-00LFuel Synthesis EngineeringW4 credits3VB. Bulfin, A. Lidor
AbstractThis course will include a revision of chemical engineering fundamentals and the basics of processes modelling for fuel synthesis technologies. Using this as a background we will then study a range of fuel production technologies, including established fossil fuel processing and emerging renewable fuel production processes.
Objective1) Develop an understanding of the fundamentals of chemical process engineering, including chemical thermodynamics, molecular theory and kinetics.
2) Learn to perform basic process modelling using some computational methods in order to analyse fuel production processes.
3) Using the fundamentals as a background, we will study a number of different fuel production processes, both conventional and emerging technologies.
ContentTheory: Chemical equilibrium thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, and chemical reaction engineering.

Processes modelling: An introduction to using cantera to model chemical processes. This part of the course includes an optional project, where the student will perform a basic analysis of a natural gas to methanol conversion process.

Fuel synthesis topics: Conventional fuel production including oil refinery, upgrading of coal and natural gas, and biofuel. Emerging renewable fuel technologies including the conversion of renewable electricity to fuels via electrolysis, the conversion of heat to fuels via thermochemical cycles, and some other speculative fuel production processes.
Lecture notesWill be available electronically.
LiteratureA) Physical Chemistry, 3rd edition, A. Alberty and J. Silbey, 2001
B) Chemical Reaction Engineering, 3rd Edition, Octave Levenspiel, 1999
C) Fundamentals of industrial catalytic processes, C. H. Bartholomew, R. J. Farrauto, 2011;
Prerequisites / NoticeSome previous studies in chemistry and chemical engineering are recommended, but not absolutely necessary. Experience with either Python or Matlab is also recommended.
151-0232-00LEngineering Acoustics IIW4 credits3GN. Noiray, S. M. Schoenwald, B. Van Damme
AbstractThis course presents the application of fundamental elements in engineering acoustics. It consists of three parts: elastic wave propagation in fluids and solids (including nonlinear, anisotropic and complex materials), sound radiation and transmission in structures, and aero- and thermo-acoustic sources and instabilities.
ObjectiveApplication of the basic concepts of engineering acoustics: acoustic absorption, solid wave propagation, acoustic transmission and sound radiation by reacting and non-reacting flows in complex engineering systems that are relevant to noise control practice. We cover the broad field of modelling, analysis, design and testing of flows, materials and structures with the aim of developing systems which exhibit the targeted acoustical behavior.
ContentWave Attenuation, Vibration Damping, Acoustic Absorption, Sound Transmission, Radiation, Broadband and Tonal Aeroacoustic Noise, Active and Passive Control of Thermoacoustic Instabilities.
Lecture notesDownload during semester.
LiteratureLiterature is given in course material.
Prerequisites / NoticeRequired: Fundamentals of Mechanics and Dynamics / Recommended: Engineering Acoustics I.
151-0252-00LGasturbines: Cycles and Combustion SystemsW4 credits2V + 1UP. Jansohn
AbstractGasturbines are used in various applications such as power generation, mechanical drives, jet engines and ship propulsion because they offer high efficiency and low emissions. For all operating conditions the chosen combustion concepts (mainly lean premix combustion) have to maintain stable heat release (combustion reactions) and low pollutant (NOx, CO) formation.
ObjectiveGet familiar with the basics of combustion systems in various gas turbine types; acquire knowledge about gas turbine applications and gas turbine based thermodynamic cycles; process efficiency at various operating conditions;
learn about gas turbine combustor geometries and design rules;
understand combustion characteristics for specific conditions relevant to gas turbines; emission characteristics (NOx, CO, soot) of gas turbine combustors; flame stability and thermoacoustics; combustion properties of a range of gas turbine fuels (liquid/gas; fossil/renewable)
Contentgasturbine types and applications
- aero engines, stationary gas turbines, mechanical drives, industrial gas turbines mobile applications
gasturbine cycles (thermodynamics)
- cycle characteristics, efficiency, specific power, process parameters (temp., pressure).
energy balance & mass flows
- compression work, expansion work, heat release, secondary air system, exhaust gas losses.
gasturbine components (introduction, basics)
- compressor, combustor, turbine, heat exchanger, ... .
burner/combustor systems
- fuel/air mixing, fuels, combustor geometries, burner configurations, flame stabilization, heat exchange/cooling schemes, emission characteristics.
flame stabilization and thermoacoustics.
combustion technologies
- lean premix combustion, staged combustion, piloting, swirl flames, operating concepts.
new technologies/current research topics
- catalytic combustion, flameless combustion, wet combustion, Zero Emission Concepts (incl. CO2 separation), combustion of hydrogen/H2
Lecture notesbooklet of slides (printing cost will be charged) and online (Ilias)
Literaturesuggestions/recommendations for additional literature studies given in the script (for each individual chapter/topic)
Prerequisites / Noticebasics in thermodynamics / thermodynamic cycles of heat engines;
basics in combustion technologies
151-0254-00LEnvironmental Aspects of Future Mobility
Note: previous course title in FS20 "Environmental Aspects of IC-Engines"
W4 credits2V + 1UY. Wright, P. Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler
AbstractThe course describes and assesses the environmental performance of current and future Mobility/Transportation and Transformation paths to sustainability. It focuses in particular on the future role of renewable synthetic chemical energy carriers from a technology point of view.
ObjectiveThe students should understand the systemic nature of the Mobility/Transportation System and be able to elaborate solutions for the defossilization of the sector. At the end of the course they should be capable to assess alternative technologies for the different subsectors for transport of people and freight including the “upstream” energy supply processes.
ContentMobility system structure, future demand trends for the various sectors (road, marine, aviation, people, freight) and appropriate energy carriers per application. Brief overview over conversion technologies. Combustion fundamentals and pollutant minimization methods for conventional and renewable fuels. Exhaust gas of aftertreatment for combustion engines and atmospheric immissions. Methods for producing renewable synthetic fuels (electrolysis, methanation/synthesis of higher hydrocarbons etc.) and related infrastructure requirements. Sector coupling and estimates of requested electricity for direct and indirect (via chemical energy carriers) electrification of mobility and appropriate supply sources.
151-0280-00LAdvanced Techniques for the Risk Analysis of Technical SystemsW4 credits2V + 1UG. Sansavini
AbstractThe course provides advanced tools for the risk/vulnerability analysis and engineering of complex technical systems and critical infrastructures. It covers application of modeling techniques and design management concepts for strengthening the performance and robustness of such systems, with reference to energy, communication and transportation systems.
ObjectiveStudents will be able to model complex technical systems and critical infrastructures including their dependencies and interdependencies. They will learn how to select and apply appropriate numerical techniques to quantify the technical risk and vulnerability in different contexts (Monte Carlo simulation, Markov chains, complex network theory). Students will be able to evaluate which method for quantification and propagation of the uncertainty of the vulnerability is more appropriate for various complex technical systems. At the end of the course, they will be able to propose design improvements and protection/mitigation strategies to reduce risks and vulnerabilities of these systems.
ContentModern technical systems and critical infrastructures are complex, highly integrated and interdependent. Examples of these are highly integrated energy supply, energy supply with high penetrations of renewable energy sources, communication, transport, and other physically networked critical infrastructures that provide vital social services. As a result, standard risk-assessment tools are insufficient in evaluating the levels of vulnerability, reliability, and risk.
This course offers suitable analytical models and computational methods to tackle this issue with scientific accuracy. Students will develop competencies which are typically requested for the formation of experts in reliability design, safety and protection of complex technical systems and critical infrastructures.
Specific topics include:
- Introduction to complex technical systems and critical infrastructures
- Basics of the Markov approach to system modeling for reliability and availability analysis
- Monte Carlo simulation for reliability and availability analysis
- Markov Chain Monte Carlo for applications to reliability and availability analysis
- Dependent, common cause and cascading failures
- Complex network theory for the vulnerability analysis of complex technical systems and critical infrastructures
- Basic concepts of uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in support to the analysis of the reliability and risk of complex systems under incomplete knowledge of their behavior
Practical exercitations and computational problems will be carried out and solved both during classroom tutorials and as homework.
Lecture notesSlides and other materials will be available online
LiteratureThe class will be largely based on the books:
- "Computational Methods For Reliability And Risk Analysis" by E. Zio, World Scientific Publishing Company
- "Vulnerable Systems" by W. Kröger and E. Zio, Springer
- additional recommendations for text books will be covered in the class
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of Probability
151-0530-00LNonlinear Dynamics and Chaos IIW4 credits4GG. Haller
AbstractThe internal structure of chaos; Hamiltonian dynamical systems; Normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds; Geometric singular perturbation theory; Finite-time dynamical systems
ObjectiveThe course introduces the student to advanced, comtemporary concepts of nonlinear dynamical systems analysis.
ContentI. The internal structure of chaos: symbolic dynamics, Bernoulli shift map, sub-shifts of finite type; chaos is numerical iterations.

II.Hamiltonian dynamical systems: conservation and recurrence, stability of fixed points, integrable systems, invariant tori, Liouville-Arnold-Jost Theorem, KAM theory.

III. Normally hyperbolic invariant manifolds: Crash course on differentiable manifolds, existence, persistence, and smoothness, applications.
IV. Geometric singular perturbation theory: slow manifolds and their stability, physical examples. V. Finite-time dynamical system; detecting Invariant manifolds and coherent structures in finite-time flows
Lecture notesStudents have to prepare their own lecture notes
LiteratureBooks will be recommended in class
Prerequisites / NoticeNonlinear Dynamics I (151-0532-00) or equivalent
151-0928-00LCO2 Capture and Storage and the Industry of Carbon-Based ResourcesW4 credits3GM. Mazzotti, A. Bardow, P. Eckle, N. Gruber, M. Repmann, T. Schmidt, D. Sutter
AbstractCarbon-based resources (coal, oil, gas): origin, production, processing, resource economics. Climate change: science, policies. CCS systems: CO2 capture in power/industrial plants, CO2 transport and storage. Besides technical details, economical, legal and societal aspects are considered (e.g. electricity markets, barriers to deployment).
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is to introduce carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) systems, the technical solutions developed so far and the current research questions. This is done in the context of the origin, production, processing and economics of carbon-based resources, and of climate change issues. After this course, students are familiar with important technical and non-technical issues related to use of carbon resources, climate change, and CCS as a transitional mitigation measure.

The class will be structured in 2 hours of lecture and one hour of exercises/discussion. At the end of the semester a group project is planned.
ContentBoth the Swiss and the European energy system face a number of significant challenges over the coming decades. The major concerns are the security and economy of energy supply and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Fossil fuels will continue to satisfy the largest part of the energy demand in the medium term for Europe, and they could become part of the Swiss energy portfolio due to the planned phase out of nuclear power. Carbon capture and storage is considered an important option for the decarbonization of the power sector and it is the only way to reduce emissions in CO2 intensive industrial plants (e.g. cement- and steel production).
Building on the previously offered class "Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS)", we have added two specific topics: 1) the industry of carbon-based resources, i.e. what is upstream of the CCS value chain, and 2) the science of climate change, i.e. why and how CO2 emissions are a problem.
The course is devided into four parts:
I) The first part will be dedicated to the origin, production, and processing of conventional as well as of unconventional carbon-based resources.
II) The second part will comprise two lectures from experts in the field of climate change sciences and resource economics.
III) The third part will explain the technical details of CO2 capture (current and future options) as well as of CO2 storage and utilization options, taking again also economical, legal, and sociatel aspects into consideration.
IV) The fourth part will comprise two lectures from industry experts, one with focus on electricity markets, the other on the experiences made with CCS technologies in the industry.
Throughout the class, time will be allocated to work on a number of tasks related to the theory, individually, in groups, or in plenum. Moreover, the students will apply the theoretical knowledge acquired during the course in a case study covering all the topics.
Lecture notesPower Point slides and distributed handouts
LiteratureIPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, 2018.
http://www.ipcc.ch/report/sr15/

IPCC AR5 Climate Change 2014: Synthesis Report, 2014. www.ipcc.ch/report/ar5/syr/

IPCC Special Report on Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage, 2005. www.ipcc.ch/activity/srccs/index.htm

The Global Status of CCS: 2014. Published by the Global CCS Institute, Nov 2014.
http://www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/global-status-ccs-2014
Prerequisites / NoticeExternal lecturers from the industry and other institutes will contribute with specialized lectures according to the schedule distributed at the beginning of the semester.
151-0944-00LCase Studies on Earth's Natural Resources
Does not take place this semester.
W3 credits3SM. Mazzotti
AbstractBy working on case studies, built around everyday consumer products, and by applying engineering principles (e.g. material and energy balances), students will gain insight into natural resources, their usage in today's society, the challenges and the opportunities ensuing from the need to make their use long-term sustainable.
ObjectiveThe students are supposed to gain insight about our natural resources, and how their usage and supply relate to our society and to us as individuals. The students will analyse how the natural resources form and change, how they are extracted and used, and how we can utilize them in a sustainable way.
ContentThe students will analyze processes and products in terms of their use of natural resources. The study will use everyday consumer products as examples, will use engineering principles together with physics and chemistry fro the analysis, and will be based on documentation collected by the students withe the help of lecturer and assistants. Through these examples, the students will be made familiar with issues about the circular economy and recycling.
Lecture notesHandouts during the class.
LiteratureWalther, John V., "Earth's natural resources", (2014) Jones & Bartlett Learning // Oberle, B., Bringezu, S., Hatfield-Dodds, S., Hellweg, S., Schandl, H., Clement, J., "Global Resources Outlook 2019: Natural resources for the future we want - A Report of the International Resource Panel", (2019) United Nations Environment Programme.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents must be enrolled in a MSc or doctoral program at ETH Zurich.
151-0946-00LMacromolecular Engineering: Networks and GelsW4 credits4GM. Tibbitt
AbstractThis course will provide an introduction to the design and physics of soft matter with a focus on polymer networks and hydrogels. The course will integrate fundamental aspects of polymer physics, engineering of soft materials, mechanics of viscoelastic materials, applications of networks and gels in biomedical applications including tissue engineering, 3D printing, and drug delivery.
ObjectiveThe main learning objectives of this course are: 1. Identify the key characteristics of soft matter and the properties of ideal and non-ideal macromolecules. 2. Calculate the physical properties of polymers in solution. 3. Predict macroscale properties of polymer networks and gels based on constituent chemical structure and topology. 4. Design networks and gels for industrial and biomedical applications. 5. Read and evaluate research papers on recent research on networks and gels and communicate the content orally to a multidisciplinary audience.
Lecture notesClass notes and handouts.
LiteraturePolymer Physics by M. Rubinstein and R.H. Colby; samplings from other texts.
Prerequisites / NoticePhysics I+II, Thermodynamics I+II
151-0980-00LBiofluiddynamicsW4 credits2V + 1UD. Obrist, P. Jenny
AbstractIntroduction to the fluid dynamics of the human body and the modeling of physiological flow processes (biomedical fluid dynamics).
ObjectiveA basic understanding of fluid dynamical processes in the human body. Knowledge of the basic concepts of fluid dynamics and the ability to apply these concepts appropriately.
ContentThis lecture is an introduction to the fluid dynamics of the human body (biomedical fluid dynamics). For selected topics of human physiology, we introduce fundamental concepts of fluid dynamics (e.g., creeping flow, incompressible flow, flow in porous media, flow with particles, fluid-structure interaction) and use them to model physiological flow processes. The list of studied topics includes the cardiovascular system and related diseases, blood rheology, microcirculation, respiratory fluid dynamics and fluid dynamics of the inner ear.
Lecture notesLecture notes are provided electronically.
LiteratureA list of books on selected topics of biofluiddynamics can be found on the course web page.
151-1115-00LAircraft Aerodynamics and Flight MechanicsW4 credits3GJ. Wildi
AbstractEquations of motion. Aircraft flight perfomance, flight envelope. Aircraft static stability and control, longituadinal and lateral stbility. Dynamic longitudinal and lateral stability.
Flight test. Wind tunnel test.
Objective- Knowledge of methods to solve flight mechanic problems
- To be able to apply basic methods for flight performence calculation and stability investigations
- Basic knowledge of flight and wind tunnel tests and test evaluation methods
ContentEquations of motion. Aircraft flight perfomance, flight envelope. Aircraft static stability and control, longituadinal and lateral stbility. Dynamic longitudinal and lateral stability.
Flight testing. Wind tunnel testing.
Lecture notesAusgewählte Kapitel der Flugtechnik (J. Wildi)
LiteratureMc Cormick, B.W.: Aerodynamics, Aeronautics and Flight Mechanics (John Wiley and Sons), 1979 / 1995

Anderson, J: Fundamentals of Aerodynamics (McGraw-Hill Comp Inc), 2010
Prerequisites / NoticeRecommended: Lecture 'Basics of Aircraft und Vehicle Aerodynamics' (FS)
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