Search result: Catalogue data in Spring Semester 2021

Environmental Sciences Master Information
Major in Atmosphere and Climate
Prerequisites
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-0412-00LClimate SystemsW3 credits2GS. I. Seneviratne, L. Gudmundsson
AbstractThis course introduces the most important physical components of the climate system and their interactions. The mechanisms of anthropogenic climate change are analysed against the background of climate history and variability. Those completing the course will be in a position to identify and explain simple problems in the area of climate systems.
ObjectiveStudents are able
- to describe the most important physical components of the global climate system and sketch their interactions
- to explain the mechanisms of anthropogenic climate change
- to identify and explain simple problems in the area of climate systems
Lecture notesCopies of the slides are provided in electronic form.
LiteratureA comprehensive list of references is provided in the class. Two books are
particularly recommended:
- Hartmann, D., 2016: Global Physical Climatology. Academic Press, London, 485 pp.
- Peixoto, J.P. and A.H. Oort, 1992: Physics of Climate. American Institute of Physics, New York, 520 pp.
Prerequisites / NoticeTeaching: Sonia I. Seneviratne & Lukas Gudmundsson, several keynotes to special topics by other professors
Course taught in german/english, slides in english
Mandatory Courses
Colloquia
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
651-4095-01LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 1 Information Restricted registration - show details O1 credit1KH. Wernli, D. N. Bresch, D. Domeisen, N. Gruber, H. Joos, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, T. Peter, C. Schär, S. Schemm, S. I. Seneviratne, M. Wild
AbstractThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
Objective-get insight into ongoing research in different fields related to atmospheric and climate science
ContentThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please confirm your attendance of 8 colloquia per semester by using the form which is provided at the course webpage.
651-4095-02LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 2 Information Restricted registration - show details O1 credit1KH. Wernli, D. N. Bresch, D. Domeisen, N. Gruber, H. Joos, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, T. Peter, C. Schär, S. Schemm, S. I. Seneviratne, M. Wild
AbstractThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
Objective-get insight into ongoing research in different fields related to atmospheric and climate sciences
Prerequisites / NoticeTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please confirm your attendance of 8 colloquia per semester by using the form which is provided at the course webpage.
651-4095-03LColloquium Atmosphere and Climate 3 Information Restricted registration - show details O1 credit1KH. Wernli, D. N. Bresch, D. Domeisen, N. Gruber, H. Joos, R. Knutti, U. Lohmann, T. Peter, C. Schär, S. Schemm, S. I. Seneviratne, M. Wild
AbstractThe colloquium is a series of scientific talks by prominent invited speakers assembling interested students and researchers from around Zürich. Students take part of the scientific discussions.
Objective-get insight into ongoing research in different fields related to atmospheric and climate sciences
Prerequisites / NoticeTo acquire credit points for this colloquium, please confirm your attendance of 8 colloquia per semester by using the form which is provided at the course webpage.
Seminars
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1211-01LMaster's Seminar: Atmosphere and Climate 1 Restricted registration - show details O3 credits2SH. Joos, R. Knutti, A. Merrifield Könz, M. A. Wüest
AbstractIn this seminar, the process of writing a scientific proposal is
introduced. The essential elements of a proposal, including the peer
review process, are outlined and class exercises train
scientific writing skills. Knowledge exchange between class
participants is promoted through the preparation of a master thesis
proposal and evaluation of each other's work.
ObjectiveScientific writing skills
How to effectively write a scientific proposal.
ContentIn this seminar, the process of writing a scientific proposal will be
introduced. The essential elements of a proposal, including the peer
review process, will be outlined and class exercises will train
scientific writing skills. Knowledge exchange between class
participants is promoted through the preparation of a master thesis
proposal and evaluation of each other's work.
Prerequisites / NoticePlease register for the seminar 1 in the semester BEFORE writing your MSc thesis.
Attendance is mandatory.
701-1211-02LMaster's Seminar: Atmosphere and Climate 2 Restricted registration - show details O3 credits2SH. Joos, R. Knutti, A. Merrifield Könz, M. A. Wüest
AbstractThis seminar brings the students working on their Master thesis together. Students present their Master thesis project including an overview of the outline and the first scientific results. In this seminar presentation skills and visualisation techniques are trained and methods of scientific project management are introduced and applied to the Master project.
Objective- training of presentation and visualisation skills
- gain basic knowledge in project management
- train how to lead a discussion, chair a presentation
ContentThis seminar brings the students working on their MSc thesis together. Students present their MSc thesis project including an overview of the outline and the first scientific results. In this seminar presentation skills and visualisation techniques are trained and methods of scientific project management are introduced and applied to the MSc project.
Prerequisites / NoticePlease register for this seminar 2 in the semester in which you work on your MSc thesis.
Attendance is mandatory
Laboratory and Field Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1260-00LClimatological and Hydrological Field Work Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30.
W2.5 credits5PD. Michel, M. Hirschi, S. I. Seneviratne
AbstractPractical work using selected measurement techniques in meteorology and hydrology. The course consists of field work with different measuring systems to determine turbulence, radiation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, discharge and the atmospheric state as well as of data analysis.
ObjectiveLearning of elementary concepts and practical experience with meteorological and hydrological measuring systems as well as data analysis.
ContentPractical work using selected measurement techniques in meteorology and hydrology. The course consists of field work with different measuring systems to determine turbulence, radiation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration, discharge and the atmospheric state as well as of data analysis.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course takes place in the hydrological research catchment Rietholzbach (field work) and at ETH (data analysis) as a block course.
701-1262-00LAtmospheric Chemistry Lab Work Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 9.
Enrollment for target group until 19.02.2021.
Waiting list until 05.03.2021.

Target groups are: MSc in Atmosphere and Climate Science ans MSc in Environmental Sciences.
W2.5 credits5PC. Marcolli, U. Krieger, T. Peter
AbstractExperiments are carried out to investigate the freezing of water droplets and ice cloud formation. Water-in-oil emulsions are prepared and cooled in a DSC (differential scanning calorimeter). The measured freezing temperatures are put in context with cloud formation in the atmosphere.
ObjectiveThis practical course offers the opportunity to get to know lab work on a topic of atmospheric importance.
ContentCirrus clouds play an important role in the radiative budget of the Earth. Due to scattering and absorption of the solar as well as terrestrial radiation the cirrus cloud cover may influence significantly the Earth climate. How the cirrus clouds exactly form, is still unknown. Ice particles in cirrus clouds may form by homogeneous ice nucleation from liquid aerosols or via heterogeneous ice nucleation on solid ice nuclei (IN). The dihydrate of oxalic acid (OAD) acts as a heterogeneous ice nucleus, with an increase in freezing temperature between 2 and 5K depending on solution composition. In several field campaigns, oxalic acid enriched particles have been detected in the upper troposphere with single particle aerosol mass spectrometry. Simulations with a microphysical box model indicate that the presence of OAD may reduce the ice particle number density in cirrus clouds by up to ~50% when compared to exclusively homogeneous cirrus formation without OAD.
The goal of this atmospheric chemistry lab work is to expand the knowledge about the influence of oxalic acid in different aqueous solution systems for the heterogeneous ice nucleation process. Experiments of emulsified aqueous solutions containing oxalic acid will be performed with a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC, TA Instruments Q10). Water-in-oil emulsions contain a high number of micrometer-sized water droplets. Each droplet freezes independently which allows the measurement of homogeneous freezing for droplets without heterogeneous IN and heterogeneous freezing in the presence of an IN. OAD is formed in-situ in a first freezing cycle and will act as an IN in a second freezing cycle. This experiment will be performed in the presence of different solutes. In general, the presence of a solute leads to a decrease of the freezing temperature. However, also more specific interactions with oxalic acid are possible so that e.g. the formation of OAD is inhibited.
In the atmospheric chemistry lab work experiments, emulsified aqueous oxalic acid solutions are prepared and investigated in the DSC during several freezing cycles. The onset of freezing is evaluated. Freezing onsets in the presence and absence of OAD are compared. This is done for pure oxalic acid solutions and oxalic acid solutions containing a second solute (e.g. another dicarboxylic acid). The quality of the emulsions is checked in an optical microscope.
Lecture notesHand-outs will be distributed during the course
LiteratureOxalic acid as a heterogeneous ice nucleus in the upper troposphere and its indirect aerosol effect,
B. Zobrist C. Marcolli, T. Koop, B. P. Luo, D. M. Murphy, U. Lohmann, A. A. Zardini, U. K. Krieger, T. Corti, D. J. Cziczo, S. Fueglistaler, P. K. Hudson, D. S. Thomson, and T. Peter
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 6, 3115–3129, 2006.
Prerequisites / NoticeThis module may be attended by 8 students at most. Practical work is carried out in groups of 2, max. 3.
701-1264-00LAtmospheric Physics Lab Work Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 18.

Target grous are: MSc Atmospheric and Climate Science, MSc Interdisciplinary Sciences, MSc Physics, MSc Environmental Sciences.
W2.5 credits5PZ. A. Kanji
AbstractExperiments covering atmospheric physics, meteorology, and aeerosol physics which will be performed in the lab and partly outdoors.
ObjectiveThis course delivers inisghts into various aspects of atmospheric physics. These will be acquired within individual experiments which cover the following topics: Wind and movement of air parcels, evaporation and cooling depending on wind velocity (wind chill), the analysis of particulate matter (aerosol particles), and their influence on the solar radiation that reaches the earth.
ContentDetails about the course are available on the web page (cf. link).
Lecture notesExperiment instructions can be found on the Atmospheric physics lab work web page.
Prerequisites / NoticeThree out of four available experiments must be carried out. The experiments are conducted in groups of 2 (or 3).
There will be three introduction lectures of 2 hours each in the beginning of the semester to familiarise students with the topics covered and report writing process. The introduction lectures will take place on Mondays March 1, March 15 and March 29 from 10-12 hours in CHN L17.1
701-1266-00LWeather Discussion Restricted registration - show details
Limited number of participants.
Preference will be given to students on the masters level in Atmospheric and Climate Science and Environmental Sciences and doctoral students in Environmental Sciences.

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in meteorology is required for this class, students are advised to take courses 702-0473-00L and/or 701-1221-00L before attending this course.
W2.5 credits2PH. Wernli
AbstractThis three-parts course includes: (i) concise units to update the students knowledge about key aspects of mid-latitude weather systems and numerical weather prediction, (ii) a concrete application of this knowledge to predict and discuss the "weather of the week", and (iii) an in-depth case study analysis, performed in small groups, of a remarkable past weather event.
ObjectiveStudents will learn how to elaborate a weather prediction and to cope with uncertainties of weather (probabilistic) prediction models. They will also learn how to apply theoretical concepts from other lecture courses on atmospheric dynamics to perform a detailed case study of a specific weather event, using state-of-the-art observational and model-derived products and datasets.
Weather Systems and Atmospheric Dynamics
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1216-00LNumerical Modelling of Weather and Climate Information W4 credits3GC. Schär, J. Vergara Temprado, M. Wild
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to weather and climate models. It discusses how these models are built addressing both the dynamical core and the physical parameterizations, and it provides an overview of how these models are used in numerical weather prediction and climate research. As a tutorial, students conduct a term project and build a simple atmospheric model using the language PYTHON.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, students understand how weather and climate models are formulated from the governing physical principles, and how they are used for climate and weather prediction purposes.
ContentThe course provides an introduction into the following themes: numerical methods (finite differences and spectral methods); adiabatic formulation of atmospheric models (vertical coordinates, hydrostatic approximation); parameterization of physical processes (e.g. clouds, convection, boundary layer, radiation); atmospheric data assimilation and weather prediction; predictability (chaos-theory, ensemble methods); climate models (coupled atmospheric, oceanic and biogeochemical models); climate prediction. Hands-on experience with simple models will be acquired in the tutorials.
Lecture notesSlides and lecture notes will be made available at
Link
LiteratureList of literature will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: to follow this course, you need some basic background in atmospheric science, numerical methods (e.g., "Numerische Methoden in der Umweltphysik", 701-0461-00L) as well as experience in programming. Previous experience with PYTHON is useful but not required.
701-1224-00LMesoscale Atmospheric Systems - Observation and ModellingW2 credits2VH. Wernli, U. Germann, S. Schemm
AbstractMesoscale meteorology focusing on processes relevant for the evolution of precipitation systems. Discussion of empirical and mathematical-physical models for, e.g., fronts and convective storms. Consideration of oceanic evaporation, transport and the associated physics of stable water isotopes. Introduction to weather radar being the widespread instrument for observing mesoscale precipitation.
ObjectiveBasic concepts of observational and theoretical mesoscale meteorology, including precipitation measurements and radar. Knowledge about the interpretation of radar images. Understanding of processes leading to the formation of fronts and convective storms, and basic knowledge on ocean evaporation and the physics of stable water isotopes.
701-1226-00LInter-Annual Phenomena and Their Prediction Information W2 credits2GC. Appenzeller
AbstractThis course provides an overview of the current ability to understand and predict intra-seasonal and inter-annual climate variability in the tropical and extra-tropical region and provides insights on how operational weather and climate services are organized.
ObjectiveStudents will acquire an understanding of the key atmosphere and ocean processes involved, will gain experience in analyzing and predicting sub-seasonal to inter-annual variability and learn how operational weather and climate services are organised and how scientific developments can improve these services.
ContentThe course covers the following topics:

Part 1:
- Introduction, some basic concepts and examples of sub-seasonal and inter-annual variability
- Weather and climate data and the statistical concepts used for analysing inter-annual variability (e.g. correlation analysis, teleconnection maps, EOF analysis)

Part 2:
- Inter-annual variability in the tropical region (e.g. ENSO, MJO)
- Inter-annual variability in the extra-tropical region (e.g. Blocking, NAO, PNA, regimes)

Part 3:
- Prediction of inter-annual variability (statistical methods, ensemble prediction systems, monthly and seasonal forecasts, seamless forecasts)
- Verification and interpretation of probabilistic forecast systems
- Climate change and inter-annual variability

Part 4:
- Scientific challenges for operational weather and climate services
- A visit to the forecasting centre of MeteoSwiss
Lecture notesA pdf version of the slides will be available at
http://www.iac.ethz.ch/edu/courses/master/modules/interannual-phenomena.html
LiteratureReferences are given during the lecture.
Climate Processes and Feedbacks
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1216-00LNumerical Modelling of Weather and Climate Information W4 credits3GC. Schär, J. Vergara Temprado, M. Wild
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to weather and climate models. It discusses how these models are built addressing both the dynamical core and the physical parameterizations, and it provides an overview of how these models are used in numerical weather prediction and climate research. As a tutorial, students conduct a term project and build a simple atmospheric model using the language PYTHON.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, students understand how weather and climate models are formulated from the governing physical principles, and how they are used for climate and weather prediction purposes.
ContentThe course provides an introduction into the following themes: numerical methods (finite differences and spectral methods); adiabatic formulation of atmospheric models (vertical coordinates, hydrostatic approximation); parameterization of physical processes (e.g. clouds, convection, boundary layer, radiation); atmospheric data assimilation and weather prediction; predictability (chaos-theory, ensemble methods); climate models (coupled atmospheric, oceanic and biogeochemical models); climate prediction. Hands-on experience with simple models will be acquired in the tutorials.
Lecture notesSlides and lecture notes will be made available at
Link
LiteratureList of literature will be provided.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: to follow this course, you need some basic background in atmospheric science, numerical methods (e.g., "Numerische Methoden in der Umweltphysik", 701-0461-00L) as well as experience in programming. Previous experience with PYTHON is useful but not required.
701-1228-00LCloud Dynamics: Hurricanes Information W4 credits3GU. Lohmann
AbstractHurricanes are among the most destructive elements in the atmosphere. This lecture will discuss the physical requirements for their formation, life cycle, damage potential and their relationship to global warming. It also distinguishes hurricanes from thunderstorms and tornadoes.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course students will be able to distinguish the formation and life cycle mechanisms of tropical cyclones from those of extratropical thunderstorms/cyclones, project how tropical cyclones change in a warmer climate based on their physics and evaluate different tropical cyclone modification ideas.
Contentsee course outline at: https://iac.ethz.ch/edu/courses/master/modules/cloud-dynamics
Lecture notesSlides will be made available
LiteratureA literature list can be found here: https://www.iac.ethz.ch/edu/courses/master/modules/cloud_dynamics
Prerequisites / NoticeAt least one introductory lecture in Atmospheric Science or Instructor's consent. This lecture will build on some concepts of atmospheric dynamics and their governing equations. Thus, mathematical knowledge will be needed to use the equations to understand the material of the course.
701-1232-00LRadiation and Climate ChangeW3 credits2GM. Wild
AbstractThis lecture focuses on the prominent role of radiation in the energy balance of the Earth and in the context of past and future climate change.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to develop a thorough understanding of the fundamental role of radiation in the context of Earth's energy balance and climate change.
ContentThe course will cover the following topics:
Basic radiation laws; sun-earth relations; the sun as driver of climate change (faint sun paradox, Milankovic ice age theory, solar cycles); radiative forcings in the atmosphere: aerosol, water vapour, clouds; radiation balance of the Earth (satellite and surface observations, modeling approaches); anthropogenic perturbation of the Earth radiation balance: greenhouse gases and enhanced greenhouse effect, air pollution and global dimming; radiation-induced feedbacks in the climate system (water vapour feedback, snow albedo feedback); climate model scenarios under various radiative forcings.
Lecture notesSlides will be made available
LiteratureAs announced in the course
701-1252-00LClimate Change Uncertainty and Risk: From Probabilistic Forecasts to Economics of Climate Adaptation Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 50.

Waiting list until 05.03.2021.
W3 credits2V + 1UD. N. Bresch, R. Knutti
AbstractThe course introduces the concepts of predictability, probability, uncertainty and probabilistic risk modelling and their application to climate modeling and the economics of climate adaptation.
ObjectiveStudents will acquire knowledge in uncertainty and risk quantification (probabilistic modelling) and an understanding of the economics of climate adaptation. They will become able to construct their own uncertainty and risk assessment models (in Python), hence basic understanding of scientific programming forms a prerequisite of the course.
ContentThe first part of the course covers methods to quantify uncertainty in detecting and attributing human influence on climate change and to generate probabilistic climate change projections on global to regional scales. Model evaluation, calibration and structural error are discussed. In the second part, quantification of risks associated with local climate impacts and the economics of different baskets of climate adaptation options are assessed – leading to informed decisions to optimally allocate resources. Such pre-emptive risk management allows evaluating a mix of prevention, preparation, response, recovery, and (financial) risk transfer actions, resulting in an optimal balance of public and private contributions to risk management, aiming at a more resilient society.
The course provides an introduction to the following themes:
1) basics of probabilistic modelling and quantification of uncertainty from global climate change to local impacts of extreme events
2) methods to optimize and constrain model parameters using observations
3) risk management from identification (perception) and understanding (assessment, modelling) to actions (prevention, preparation, response, recovery, risk transfer)
4) basics of economic evaluation, economic decision making in the presence of climate risks and pre-emptive risk management to optimally allocate resources
Lecture notesPowerpoint slides will be made available.
LiteratureMany papers for in-depth study will be referred to during the lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeHands-on experience with probabilistic climate models and risk models will be acquired in the tutorials; hence good understanding of scientific programming forms a prerequisite of the course, in Python (teaching language, object oriented) or similar. Basic understanding of the climate system, e.g. as covered in the course 'Klimasysteme' is required, as well as beginner level in statistical and time series analysis.

Examination: graded tutorials during the semester (benotete Semesterleistung)
Atmospheric Composition and Cycles
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-1234-00LTropospheric Chemistry Information W3 credits2GD. W. Brunner, I. El Haddad
AbstractThe course gives an overview tropospheric chemistry, which is based on laboratory studies, measurements and numerical modelling. The topics include aerosol, photochemistry, emissions and depositions. The lecture covers urban-regional-to-global scale issues, as well as fundamentals of the atmospheric nitrogen, sulfur and methane cycles and their contributions to aerosol and oxidant formation.
ObjectiveBased on the presented material the students are expected to understand the most relevant processes responsible for the anthropogenic disturbances of tropospheric chemical composition. The competence of synthesis of knowledge will be improved by paper reading and student's presentations.
These presentations relate to a particular actual problem selected by the candidates.
ContentStarting from the knowledge acquired in lecture 701-0471, the course provides a more profound view on the the chemical and dynamical process governing the composition and impacts of air pollutants like aerosol and ozone, at the Earth's surface and the free troposphere.
Specific topics covered by the lecture are: laboratory and ambient measurements in polluted and pristine regions, the determination of emissions of a variety of components, numerical modelling across scales, regional air pollution - aerosol, and photooxidant in relation to precursor emissions,
impacts (health, vegetation, climate), the global cycles of tropospheric ozone, CH4, sulfur and nitrogen components.
Lecture notesLecture presentations are available for download.
LiteratureD. Jacob, Introduction to Atmospheric Chemistry http://acmg.seas.harvard.edu/publications/jacobbook

Mark Z. Jacobson: Fundamentals of Atmospheric Modelling, Cambridge University Press

John Seinfeld and Spyros Pandis, Atmosperic Chemistry and Physics, from air pollution to Climate Change, Wiley, 2006.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe basics in physical chemsitry are required and an overview equivalent to the bachelor course in atmospheric chemsitry (lecture 701-0471-01) is expected.
701-1238-00LAdvanced Field and Lab Studies in Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 4.
Enrollment for target group until 22.02.2021.
Waiting list until 05.03.2021.

Target groups are: MSc in Atmosphere and Climate Science ans MSc in Environmental Sciences.
W3 credits2PU. Krieger
AbstractEach year an individual assignment of a specific topic (related to field work) will be made for interested students who will acquire knowledge in experimental, instrumental, or numerical aspects of atmospheric chemistry. Partly self-organized project requiring independent work in a small group.
ObjectiveThe learning target is to acquire knowledge in experimental, instrumental, numerical or theoretical aspects of atmospheric chemistry through practical work on a specific topic.

The course will be held in connection with the course 701-0460-00 P, "Practical training in atmosphere and climate". There, we offer the opportunity to carry out atmospheric physical and chemical experiments. Here, an individual assignment of a specific topic will be made for a small group of interested students.

The course is particularly addressed to students who have not attended the practical course 701-0460-00 P during their Bachelor studies, but want to gain knowledge in field work connected to atmospheric chemistry. The specific topic to work on will be chosen based on individual interests and resources available.
Prerequisites / NoticeIt is mandatory for interested students to contact the instructor before the term starts, so that individual assignments can be made/planned for.

The maximum number of participants for this course will be limited depending on resources available.
701-1317-00LGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles and ClimateW3 credits3GN. Gruber, M. Vogt
AbstractThe human-induced emissions of carbon dioxide has led to atmospheric CO2 concentrations that Earth likely has no’t seen for the last 30 million years. This course aims to investigate and understand the impact of humans on Earth's biogeochemical cycles with a focus on the carbon cycle and its interaction with the physical climate system for the past, the present, and the future.
ObjectiveThis course aims to investigate the nature of the interaction between the carbon cycles on land and in the ocean with climate and how this interaction has evolved over time and will change in the future. Students are expected to participate actively in the course, which includes the critical reading of the pertinent literature.
ContentTopics discussed include: The anthropogenic perturbation of the global carbon cycle and climate. Response of land and oceanic ecosystems to past and future global changes; Interactions between biogeochemical cycles on land and in the ocean; Biogeochemical processes controlling carbon dioxide and oxygen in the ocean and atmosphere on time-scales from a few years to a few hundred thousand years.
Lecture notesSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press.
Additional handouts will be provided as needed. see website: http://www.up.ethz.ch/education/biogeochem_cycles
LiteratureSarmiento & Gruber (2006), Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, Princeton University Press, 526pp.

Original literature.
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