Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2020

MAS in Medical Physics Information
Specialisation in General Medical Physics
Major in Bioelectronics
Electives
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-1033-00LNeuromorphic Engineering I Information Restricted registration - show details
Registration in this class requires the permission of the instructors. Class size will be limited to available lab spots.
Preference is given to students that require this class as part of their major.

Information for UZH students:
Enrolment to this course unit only possible at ETH. No enrolment to module INI404 at UZH.
Please mind the ETH enrolment deadlines for UZH students: Link
W6 credits2V + 3UT. Delbrück, G. Indiveri, S.‑C. Liu
AbstractThis course covers analog circuits with emphasis on neuromorphic engineering: MOS transistors in CMOS technology, static circuits, dynamic circuits, systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina, silicon cochlea) with an introduction to multi-chip systems. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of the characteristics of neuromorphic circuit elements.
ContentNeuromorphic circuits are inspired by the organizing principles of biological neural circuits. Their computational primitives are based on physics of semiconductor devices. Neuromorphic architectures often rely on collective computation in parallel networks. Adaptation, learning and memory are implemented locally within the individual computational elements. Transistors are often operated in weak inversion (below threshold), where they exhibit exponential I-V characteristics and low currents. These properties lead to the feasibility of high-density, low-power implementations of functions that are computationally intensive in other paradigms. Application domains of neuromorphic circuits include silicon retinas and cochleas for machine vision and audition, real-time emulations of networks of biological neurons, and the development of autonomous robotic systems. This course covers devices in CMOS technology (MOS transistor below and above threshold, floating-gate MOS transistor, phototransducers), static circuits (differential pair, current mirror, transconductance amplifiers, etc.), dynamic circuits (linear and nonlinear filters, adaptive circuits), systems (silicon neuron, silicon retina and cochlea) and an introduction to multi-chip systems that communicate events analogous to spikes. The lectures are accompanied by weekly laboratory sessions on the characterization of neuromorphic circuits, from elementary devices to systems.
LiteratureS.-C. Liu et al.: Analog VLSI Circuits and Principles; various publications.
Prerequisites / NoticeParticular: The course is highly recommended for those who intend to take the spring semester course 'Neuromorphic Engineering II', that teaches the conception, simulation, and physical layout of such circuits with chip design tools.

Prerequisites: Background in basics of semiconductor physics helpful, but not required.
227-2037-00LPhysical Modelling and SimulationW6 credits4GJ. Smajic
AbstractThis module consists of (a) an introduction to fundamental equations of electromagnetics, mechanics and heat transfer, (b) a detailed overview of numerical methods for field simulations, and (c) practical examples solved in form of small projects.
ObjectiveBasic knowledge of the fundamental equations and effects of electromagnetics, mechanics, and heat transfer. Knowledge of the main concepts of numerical methods for physical modelling and simulation. Ability (a) to develop own simple field simulation programs, (b) to select an appropriate field solver for a given problem, (c) to perform field simulations, (d) to evaluate the obtained results, and (e) to interactively improve the models until sufficiently accurate results are obtained.
ContentThe module begins with an introduction to the fundamental equations and effects of electromagnetics, mechanics, and heat transfer. After the introduction follows a detailed overview of the available numerical methods for solving electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical boundary value problems. This part of the course contains a general introduction into numerical methods, differential and integral forms, linear equation systems, Finite Difference Method (FDM), Boundary Element Method (BEM), Method of Moments (MoM), Multiple Multipole Program (MMP) and Finite Element Method (FEM). The theoretical part of the course finishes with a presentation of multiphysics simulations through several practical examples of HF-engineering such as coupled electromagnetic-mechanical and electromagnetic-thermal analysis of MEMS.
In the second part of the course the students will work in small groups on practical simulation problems. For solving practical problems the students can develop and use own simulation programs or chose an appropriate commercial field solver for their specific problem. This practical simulation work of the students is supervised by the lecturers.
376-1103-00LFrontiers in NanotechnologyW4 credits4VV. Vogel, further lecturers
AbstractMany disciplines are meeting at the nanoscale, from physics, chemistry to engineering, from the life sciences to medicine. The course will prepare students to communicate more effectively across disciplinary boundaries, and will provide them with deep insights into the various frontiers.
ObjectiveBuilding upon advanced technologies to create, visualize, analyze and manipulate nano-structures, as well as to probe their nano-chemistry, nano-mechanics and other properties within manmade and living systems, many exciting discoveries are currently made. They change the way we do science and result in so many new technologies.

The goal of the course is to give Master and Graduate students from all interested departments an overview of what nanotechnology is all about, from analytical techniques to nanosystems, from physics to biology. Students will start to appreciate the extent to which scientific communities are meeting at the nanoscale. They will learn about the specific challenges and what is currently “sizzling” in the respective fields, and learn the vocabulary that is necessary to communicate effectively across departmental boundaries.

Each lecturer will first give an overview of the state-of-the art in his/her field, and then describe the research highlights in his/her own research group. While preparing their Final Projects and discussing them in front of the class, the students will deepen their understanding of how to apply a range of new technologies to solve specific scientific problems and technical challenges. Exposure to the different frontiers will also improve their ability to conduct effective nanoscale research, recognize the broader significance of their work and to start collaborations.
ContentStarting with the fabrication and analysis of nanoparticles and nanostructured materials that enable a variety of scientific and technical applications, we will transition to discussing biological nanosystems, how they work and what bioinspired engineering principles can be derived, to finally discussing biomedical applications and potential health risk issues. Scientific aspects as well as the many of the emerging technologies will be covered that start impacting so many aspects of our lives. This includes new phenomena in physics, advanced materials, novel technologies and new methods to address major medical challenges.
Lecture notesAll the enrolled students will get access to a password protected website where they can find pdf files of the lecture notes, and typically 1-2 journal articles per lecture that cover selected topics.
402-0674-00LPhysics in Medical Research: From Atoms to Cells Information W6 credits2V + 1UB. K. R. Müller
AbstractScanning probe and diffraction techniques allow studying activated atomic processes during early stages of epitaxial growth. For quantitative description, rate equation analysis, mean-field nucleation and scaling theories are applied on systems ranging from simple metallic to complex organic materials. The knowledge is expanded to optical and electronic properties as well as to proteins and cells.
ObjectiveThe lecture series is motivated by an overview covering the skin of the crystals, roughness analysis, contact angle measurements, protein absorption/activity and monocyte behaviour.

As the first step, real structures on clean surfaces including surface reconstructions and surface relaxations, defects in crystals are presented, before the preparation of clean metallic, semiconducting, oxidic and organic surfaces are introduced.

The atomic processes on surfaces are activated by the increase of the substrate temperature. They can be studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The combination with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) allows determining the sizes of the critical nuclei and the other activated processes in a hierarchical fashion. The evolution of the surface morphology is characterized by the density and size distribution of the nanostructures that could be quantified by means of the rate equation analysis, the mean-field nucleation theory, as well as the scaling theory. The surface morphology is further characterized by defects and nanostructure's shapes, which are based on the strain relieving mechanisms and kinetic growth processes.

High-resolution electron diffraction is complementary to scanning probe techniques and provides exact mean values. Some phenomena are quantitatively described by the kinematic theory and perfectly understood by means of the Ewald construction. Other phenomena need to be described by the more complex dynamical theory. Electron diffraction is not only associated with elastic scattering but also inelastic excitation mechanisms that reflect the electronic structure of the surfaces studied. Low-energy electrons lead to phonon and high-energy electrons to plasmon excitations. Both effects are perfectly described by dipole and impact scattering.

Thin-films of rather complex organic materials are often quantitatively characterized by photons with a broad range of wavelengths from ultra-violet to infra-red light. Asymmetries and preferential orientations of the (anisotropic) molecules are verified using the optical dichroism and second harmonic generation measurements. Recently, ellipsometry has been introduced to on-line monitor film thickness, and roughness with sub-nanometer precision. These characterisation techniques are vital for optimising the preparation of medical implants.

Cell-surface interactions are related to the cell adhesion and the contractile cellular forces. Physical means have been developed to quantify these interactions. Other physical techniques are introduced in cell biology, namely to count and sort cells, to study cell proliferation and metabolism and to determine the relation between cell morphology and function.

X rays are more and more often used to characterise the human tissues down to the nanometer level. The combination of highly intense beams only some micrometers in diameter with scanning enables spatially resolved measurements and the determination of tissue's anisotropies of biopsies.
529-0837-01LBiomicrofluidic Engineering Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 25.
W6 credits3GA. de Mello
AbstractMicrofluidics describes the behaviour, control and manipulation of fluids that are geometrically constrained within sub-microliter environments. The use of microfluidic devices offers an opportunity to control physical and chemical processes with unrivalled precision, and in turn provides a route to performing chemistry and biology in an ultra-fast and high-efficiency manner.
ObjectiveIn the course students will investigate the theoretical concepts behind microfluidic device operation, the methods of microfluidic device manufacture and the application of microfluidic architectures to important problems faced in modern day chemical and biological analysis. A design workshop will allow students to develop new microscale flow processes by appreciating the dominant physics at the microscale. The application of these basic ideas will primarily focus on biological problems and will include a treatment of diagnostic devices for use at the point-of-care, advanced functional material synthesis, DNA analysis, proteomics and cell-based assays. Lectures, assignments and the design workshop will acquaint students with the state-of-the-art in applied microfluidics.
ContentSpecific topics in the course include, but not limited to:

1. Theoretical Concepts
Features of mass and thermal transport on the microscale
Key scaling laws
2. Microfluidic Device Manufacture
Conventional lithographic processing of rigid materials
Soft lithographic processing of plastics and polymers
Mass fabrication of polymeric devices
3. Unit operations and functional components
Analytical separations (electrophoresis and chromatography)
Chemical and biological synthesis
Sample pre-treatment (filtration, SPE, pre-concentration)
Molecular detection
4. Design Workshop
Design of microfluidic architectures for PCR, distillation & mixing
5. Contemporary Applications in Biological Analysis
Microarrays
Cellular analyses (single cells, enzymatic assays, cell sorting)
Proteomics
6. System integration
Applications in radiochemistry, diagnostics and high-throughput experimentation
Lecture notesLecture handouts, background literature, problem sheets and notes will be provided electronically.
Prerequisites / NoticeSafety concept: https://chab.ethz.ch/studium/bachelor1.html
636-0108-00LBiological Engineering and Biotechnology
Attention: This course was offered in previous semesters with the number: 636-0003-00L "Biological Engineering and Biotechnology". Students that already passed course 636-0003-00L cannot receive credits for course 636-0108-00L.
W4 credits3VM. Fussenegger
AbstractBiological Engineering and Biotechnology will cover the latest biotechnological advances as well as their industrial implementation to engineer mammalian cells for use in human therapy. This lecture will provide forefront insights into key scientific aspects and the main points in industrial decision-making to bring a therapeutic from target to market.
ObjectiveBiological Engineering and Biotechnology will cover the latest biotechnological advances as well as their industrial implementation to engineer mammalian cells for use in human therapy. This lecture will provide forefront insights into key scientific aspects and the main points in industrial decision-making to bring a therapeutic from target to market.
Content1. Insight Into The Mammalian Cell Cycle. Cycling, The Balance Between Proliferation and Cancer - Implications For Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing. 2. The Licence To Kill. Apoptosis Regulatory Networks - Engineering of Survival Pathways To Increase Robustness of Production Cell Lines. 3. Everything Under Control I. Regulated Transgene Expression in Mammalian Cells - Facts and Future. 4. Secretion Engineering. The Traffic Jam getting out of the Cell. 5. From Target To Market. An Antibody's Journey From Cell Culture to The Clinics. 6. Biology and Malign Applications. Do Life Sciences Enable the Development of Biological Weapons? 7. Functional Food. Enjoy your Meal! 8. Industrial Genomics. Getting a Systems View on Nutrition and Health - An Industrial Perspective. 9. IP Management - Food Technology. Protecting Your Knowledge For Business. 10. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing I. Introduction to Process Development. 11. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing II. Up- stream Development. 12. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing III. Downstream Development. 13. Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing IV. Pharma Development.
Lecture notesHandout during the course.
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