Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2020

Health Sciences and Technology Master Information
Major in Human Movement Science and Sport
Compulsory Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-0300-00LTranslational Science for Health and Medicine Restricted registration - show details O3 credits2GJ. Goldhahn, C. Wolfrum
AbstractTranslational science is a cross disciplinary scientific research that is motivated by the need for practical applications that help people. The course should help to clarify basics of translational science, illustrate successful applications and should enable students to integrate key features into their future projects.
ObjectiveAfter completing this course, students will be able to understand:
Principles of translational science (including project planning, ethics application, basics of resource management and interdisciplinary communication)
ContentWhat is translational science and what is it not?
How to identify need?
- Disease concepts and consequences for research
- Basics about incidence, prevalence etc., and orphan indications
How to choose the appropriate research type and methodology
- Ethical considerations including ethics application
- Pros and cons of different types of research
- Coordination of complex approaches incl. timing and resources
How to measure success?
- Outcome variables
- Improving the translational process
Challenges of communication?
How independent is translational science?
- Academic boundary conditions vs. industrial influences
Positive and negative examples will be illustrated by distinguished guest speakers.
376-0302-01LGCP Basic Course (Modules 1 and 2) Restricted registration - show details
Only for Health Sciences and Technology MSc.
O1 credit1GG. Senti
AbstractThe basic course in "Good Clinical Practice" (GCP) contains of two full-time training days (Module 1 and Module 2) and addresses elementary aspects for the appropriate conduct of clinical trials and non-clinical research projects involving human beings. Successful participation will be confirmed by a certificate that is recognized by the Swiss authorities.
ObjectiveStudents will get familiar with:
- Key Ethics documents
- (Inter)national Guidelines and Laws (e.g. ICH-GCP, DIN EN ISO 14155, TPA, HRA)
- Sequence of research projects and project-involved parties
- Planning of research projects (statistics, resources, study design, set-up of the study protocol)
- Approval of research projects by Authorities (SwissEthics, Swissmedic, FOPH)
- Roles and responsibilities of project-involved parties

Students will learn how to:
- Classify research projects according the risk-based approach of the HRA
- Write a study protocol
- Inform participating patients/study subjects
- Obtain consent by participating patients/study subjects
- Classify, document and report Adverse Events
- Handle projects with biological material from humans and/or health- related personal data
ContentModule 1:
Research and Research Ethics, Guidelines, (inter)national Legislation, Development of therapeutic products, Methodology (Study Design), Study documents (Study protocol, Investigator's Brochure, Patient Information Leaflet, Informed Consent Form)

Module 2:
Roles and Responsibilities, Approval procedures, Notification and Reporting, Study documentation, Research with biological material and health-related data, data protection, data retention
Electives
Electives Courses I
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
376-0221-00LMethods and Concepts in Human Systems Neuroscience and Motor Control Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12
No option for online-participation.
W4 credits3PN. Wenderoth
AbstractThis course provides hands-on experience with measurement and analysis methods relevant for Humans Systems Neuroscience and Motor control (nerve/brain stimulation, EMG, EEG, psycho-physical paradigms etc). Students read scientific material, set up experiments, perform measurements in the lab, analyse data, apply statistics and write short reports or essays.
ObjectiveThis course will prepare students for experimental work as it is typically done during the master thesis. The goal is to gain hands-on experience with measurement and analysis methods relevant for Humans Systems Neuroscience and Motor control (ifor example peripheral nerve stimulation, electrical and magnetic brain stimulation, EMG, EEG, psycho-physical paradigms etc). Students will learn how to perform small scientific projects in this area. Students will work individually or in small groups and solve scientific problems which require them to perform measurements in human participants, extract relevant readouts from the data, apply appropriate statistics and interpret the results. They will also be required to write small essays and reports and they will get feedback on their writing throughout the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeStudents are required to have successfully completed the course "Neural control of movement and motor learning" and to have basic knowledge of applied statistics.
376-0223-00LAdvanced Topics in Exercise Physiology Restricted registration - show details
Maximal 18 Teilnehmer
W4 credits2SC. Spengler, F. Gabe Beltrami, T. Gorski
AbstractIn this course, students read, present and discuss seminal publications in the area of exercise physiology. The focus lies on critical analysis of scientific content, conceptual as well as ethical aspects of publications. Students are trained in the most common scientific presentation techniques such as oral and poster presentations.
ObjectiveStudents gain further knowledge and a deeper understanding of concepts in exercise physiology. Emphasis is put on critical analysis and discussion of scientific publications as well as on improving scientific presentation skills.
ContentAbout two third of the semester will be spent discussing structure and content of 2-3 scientific papers per double-lecture. This includes a student presenting the paper orally first, followed by the group discussion. Each student will also prepare and present a poster on a self-selected, scientific publication, participate in a poster discussion session and lead another discussion session as a facilitator. Student groups will prepare a scientific study design to a given, applied exercise physiology question. Furthermore, students will compare an article published in the lay press to the scientific publication the article is based on.
LiteratureMaterial will be provided in moodle.
Prerequisites / NoticeSuccessful completion of the Exercise Physiology Course.
376-0225-00LPhysical Activities and HealthW3 credits2VR. Knols, E. de Bruin, further speakers
AbstractThis course introduces/explores the complex relationship between physical activity, sedentary behavior and health. It will discuss the evolution of current physical activity recommendations. It will examine the current evidence base that has informed physical activity recommendations and that identified physical activity as a key modifiable lifestyle behavior contributing to disease and mortality.
ObjectiveOn completion of this course students will be able to demonstrate:
1. knowledge of and critical awareness of the role of physical activity and sedentary behavior in the maintenance of health and the aetiology, prevention and treatment of disease.
2. thorough knowledge and critical awareness of current recommendations for physical activity, and current prevalence and trends of physical activity and associated diseases
3. awareness of current national and international physical activity policies and how these impact on global challenges
ContentIntroduction to Physical Activity for Health, including sedentary behavior
Physical activity epidemiology; concepts principles and approaches
Physical activity and all cause morbidity and mortality
Physical activity and chronic disease; Coronary heart disease, diabetes, bone health, cancer and obesity
Physical activity and brain health
Physical activity and sedentary behavior recommendations
Population prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior
Physical activity policies
Physical activity assessment
LiteratureCore texts for this course are:
Hardman, A. and Stensel, D. Physical activity and health : the evidence explained. 2nd edition. (2009) UK, Routledge.

Bouchard, C., Blair, S. N., & Haskell, W. L. (Eds.). (2012). Physical activity and health. Champaign, IL: Human Kinetics.

Selective journal articles from relevant journals such as Journal of Physical Activity and Health and Journal of Aging and Physical Activity
Prerequisites / NoticeFrom the BSc-course the following book is recommended: 'Essentials of strength training and conditioning' T. Baechle, R. Earle (3rd Edition)
376-1651-00LClinical and Movement Biomechanics Information Restricted registration - show details W4 credits3GN. Singh, R. List, P. Schütz
AbstractMeasurement and modeling of the human movement during daily activities and in a clinical environment.
ObjectiveThe students are able to analyse the human movement from a technical point of view, to process the data and perform modeling with a focus towards clinical application.
ContentThis course includes study design, measurement techniques, clinical testing, accessing movement data and anysis as well as modeling with regards to human movement.
752-6101-00LDietary Etiologies of Chronic DiseaseW3 credits2VM. B. Zimmermann
AbstractTo have the student gain understanding of the links between the diet and the etiology and progression of chronic diseases, including diabetes, gastrointestinal diseases, kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, arthritis and food allergies.
ObjectiveTo examine and understand the protective effect of foods and food ingredients in the maintenance of health and the prevention of chronic disease, as well as the progression of complications of the chronic diseases.
ContentThe course evaluates food and food ingredients in relation to primary and secondary prevention of chronic diseases including diabetes, gastrointestinal diseases, kidney disease, cardiovascular disease, arthritis and food allergies.
Lecture notesThere is no script. Powerpoint presentations will be made available on-line to students.
LiteratureTo be provided by the individual lecturers, at their discretion.
Prerequisites / NoticeNo compulsory prerequisites, but prior completion of the courses "Introduction to Nutritional Science" and "Advanced Topics in Nutritional Science" is strongly advised.
Elective Courses II
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
227-0385-10LBiomedical ImagingW6 credits5GS. Kozerke, K. P. Prüssmann
AbstractIntroduction and analysis of medical imaging technology including X-ray procedures, computed tomography, nuclear imaging techniques using single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging techniques.
ObjectiveTo understand the physical and technical principles underlying X-ray imaging, computed tomography, single photon and positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and Doppler imaging techniques. The mathematical framework is developed to describe image encoding/decoding, point-spread function/modular transfer function, signal-to-noise ratio, contrast behavior for each of the methods. Matlab exercises are used to implement and study basic concepts.
Content- X-ray imaging
- Computed tomography
- Single photon emission tomography
- Positron emission tomography
- Magnetic resonance imaging
- Ultrasound/Doppler imaging
Lecture notesLecture notes and handouts
LiteratureWebb A, Smith N.B. Introduction to Medical Imaging: Physics, Engineering and Clinical Applications; Cambridge University Press 2011
Prerequisites / NoticeAnalysis, Linear Algebra, Physics, Basics of Signal Theory, Basic skills in Matlab programming
227-0386-00LBiomedical Engineering Information W4 credits3GJ. Vörös, S. J. Ferguson, S. Kozerke, M. P. Wolf, M. Zenobi-Wong
AbstractIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The focus is on learning the concepts that govern common medical instruments and the most important organs from an engineering point of view. In addition, the most recent achievements and trends of the field of biomedical engineering are also outlined.
ObjectiveIntroduction into selected topics of biomedical engineering as well as their relationship with physics and physiology. The course provides an overview of the various topics of the different tracks of the biomedical engineering master course and helps orienting the students in selecting their specialized classes and project locations.
ContentIntroduction into neuro- and electrophysiology. Functional analysis of peripheral nerves, muscles, sensory organs and the central nervous system. Electrograms, evoked potentials. Audiometry, optometry. Functional electrostimulation: Cardiac pacemakers. Function of the heart and the circulatory system, transport and exchange of substances in the human body, pharmacokinetics. Endoscopy, medical television technology. Lithotripsy. Electrical Safety. Orthopaedic biomechanics. Lung function. Bioinformatics and Bioelectronics. Biomaterials. Biosensors. Microcirculation.Metabolism.
Practical and theoretical exercises in small groups in the laboratory.
Lecture notesIntroduction to Biomedical Engineering
by Enderle, Banchard, and Bronzino

AND

https://lbb.ethz.ch/education/biomedical-engineering.html
227-0447-00LImage Analysis and Computer Vision Information W6 credits3V + 1UL. Van Gool, E. Konukoglu, F. Yu
AbstractLight and perception. Digital image formation. Image enhancement and feature extraction. Unitary transformations. Color and texture. Image segmentation. Motion extraction and tracking. 3D data extraction. Invariant features. Specific object recognition and object class recognition. Deep learning and Convolutional Neural Networks.
ObjectiveOverview of the most important concepts of image formation, perception and analysis, and Computer Vision. Gaining own experience through practical computer and programming exercises.
ContentThis course aims at offering a self-contained account of computer vision and its underlying concepts, including the recent use of deep learning.
The first part starts with an overview of existing and emerging applications that need computer vision. It shows that the realm of image processing is no longer restricted to the factory floor, but is entering several fields of our daily life. First the interaction of light with matter is considered. The most important hardware components such as cameras and illumination sources are also discussed. The course then turns to image discretization, necessary to process images by computer.
The next part describes necessary pre-processing steps, that enhance image quality and/or detect specific features. Linear and non-linear filters are introduced for that purpose. The course will continue by analyzing procedures allowing to extract additional types of basic information from multiple images, with motion and 3D shape as two important examples. Finally, approaches for the recognition of specific objects as well as object classes will be discussed and analyzed. A major part at the end is devoted to deep learning and AI-based approaches to image analysis. Its main focus is on object recognition, but also other examples of image processing using deep neural nets are given.
Lecture notesCourse material Script, computer demonstrations, exercises and problem solutions
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites:
Basic concepts of mathematical analysis and linear algebra. The computer exercises are based on Python and Linux.
The course language is English.
327-2125-00LMicroscopy Training SEM I - Introduction to SEM Restricted registration - show details
The number of participants is limited. In case of overbooking, the course will be repeated once. All registrations will be recorded on the waiting list.

For PhD students, postdocs and others, a fee will be charged (http://www.scopem.ethz.ch/education/MTP.html).

All applicants must additionally register on this form: Link
The selected applicants will be contacted and asked for confirmation a few weeks before the course date.
W2 credits3PP. Zeng, A. G. Bittermann, S. Gerstl, L. Grafulha Morales, K. Kunze, J. Reuteler
AbstractThis introductory course on Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) emphasizes hands-on learning. Using ScopeM SEMs, students have the opportunity to study their own samples (or samples provided) and solve practical problems by applying knowledge acquired during the lectures. At the end of the course, students will be able to apply SEM for their (future) research projects.
Objective- Set-up, align and operate a SEM successfully and safely.
- Understand important operational parameters of SEM and optimize microscope performance.
- Explain different signals in SEM and obtain secondary electron (SE) and backscatter electron (BSE) images.
- Operate the SEM in low-vacuum mode.
- Make use of EDX for semi-quantitative elemental analysis.
- Prepare samples with different techniques and equipment for imaging and analysis by SEM.
ContentDuring the course, students learn through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on sessions how to setup and operate SEM instruments, including low-vacuum and low-voltage applications.
This course gives basic skills for students new to SEM. At the end of the course, students are able to align an SEM, to obtain secondary electron (SE) and backscatter electron (BSE) images and to perform energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) semi-quantitative analysis. Emphasis is put on procedures to optimize SEM parameters in order to best solve practical problems and deal with a wide range of materials.

Lectures:
- Introduction on Electron Microscopy and instrumentation
- electron sources, electron lenses and probe formation
- beam/specimen interaction, image formation, image contrast and imaging modes.
- sample preparation techniques for EM
- X-ray micro-analysis (theory and detection), qualitative and semi-quantitative EDX and point analysis, linescan and spectral mapping

Practicals:
- Brief description and demonstration of the SEM microscope
- Practice on image formation, image contrast (and image processing)
- Student participation on sample preparation techniques
- Scanning Electron Microscopy lab exercises: setup and operate the instrument under various imaging modalities
- Practice on real-world samples and report results
Lecture notesLecture notes will be distributed.
Literature- Peter Goodhew, John Humphreys, Richard Beanland: Electron Microscopy and Analysis, 3rd ed., CRC Press, 2000
- Joseph Goldstein, et al, Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Microanalysis, 4th ed, Srpinger US, 2018
- Egerton: Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy: an introduction to TEM, SEM and AEM, Springer Verlag, 2007
Prerequisites / NoticeNo mandatory prerequisites.
327-2126-00LMicroscopy Training TEM I - Introduction to TEM Restricted registration - show details
The number of participants is limited. In case of overbooking, the course will be repeated once. All registrations will be recorded on the waiting list.

For PhD students, postdocs and others, a fee will be charged (http://www.scopem.ethz.ch/education/MTP.html).

All applicants must additionally register on this form: Link
The selected applicants will be contacted and asked for confirmation a few weeks before the course date.
W2 credits3PP. Zeng, E. J. Barthazy Meier, A. G. Bittermann, F. Gramm, A. Sologubenko, M. Willinger
AbstractThe introductory course on Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) provides theoretical and hands-on learning for beginners who are interested in using TEM for their Master or PhD thesis. TEM sample preparation techniques are also discussed. During hands-on sessions at different TEM instruments, students will have the opportunity to examine their own samples if time allows.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of
1. the set-up and individual components of a TEM
2. the basics of electron optics and image formation
3. the basics of electron beam – sample interactions
4. the contrast mechanism
5. various sample preparation techniques
Learning how to
1. align and operate a TEM
2. acquire data using different operation modes of a TEM instrument, i.e. Bright-field and Dark-field imaging
3. record electron diffraction patterns and index diffraction patterns
4. interpret TEM data
ContentLectures:
- basics of electron optics and the TEM instrument set-up
- TEM imaging modes and image contrast
- STEM operation mode
- Sample preparation techniques for hard and soft materials

Practicals:
- Demo, practical demonstration of a TEM: instrument components, alignment, etc.
- Hands-on training for students: sample loading, instrument alignment and data acquisition.
- Sample preparation for different types of materials
- Practical work with TEMs
- Demonstration of advanced Transmission Electron Microscopy techniques
Lecture notesLecture notes will be distributed.
Literature- Williams, Carter: Transmission Electron Microscopy, Plenum Press, 1996
- Hawkes, Valdre: Biophysical Electron Microscopy, Academic Press, 1990
- Egerton: Physical Principles of Electron Microscopy: an introduction to TEM, SEM and AEM, Springer Verlag, 2007
Prerequisites / NoticeNo mandatory prerequisites. Please consider the prior attendance to EM Basic lectures (551-1618-00V; 227-0390-00L; 327-0703-00L) as suggested prerequisite.
363-0301-00LWork Design and Organizational Change Information W3 credits2GG. Grote
AbstractGood work design is crucial for individual and company effectiveness and a core element to be considered in organizational change. Meaning of work, organization-technology interaction, and uncertainty management are discussed with respect to work design and sustainable organizational change. As course project, students learn and apply a method for analyzing and designing work in business settings.
ObjectiveThe purpose of this lecture is to introduce the high relevance of work design for employee well-being and satisfaction as well as for individual and company performance and to present and discuss different approaches to bringing about the necessary changes in organizations.

Specific learning objectives are the following:
- Know effects of work design on competence, motivation, and well-being
- Understand links between design of individual jobs and work processes
- Know basic processes involved in systematic organizational change
- Understand the interaction between organization and technology and its impact on organizational change
- Understand relevance of work design for company performance and strategy
- Know and apply methods for analyzing and designing work

In the first part of the lecture, criteria for good work design and the empirical evidence for their impact on individuals and organizations are presented and discussed.

In the second part of the lecture, organizational change is discussed, both based on research as well as many company examples. In this part, several guest lecturers from consulting companies present their approaches to helping organizations manage change. Moreover, the role of technology as a source and catalyst of change, such as in the current digital transformation, is examined.

In addition to the lectures, students will work on a project in small groups in which they will analyze a work system in a company according to a set pf criteria for good work design and develop a proposal for organizational change to improve work design.
ContentThe course is organized in a highly interactive fashion, where discussion in class is as important as the input by the lecturer. Understanding the dynamics in organizations is helped enormously by concrete examples, which will be provided by the lecturer, by talks by guest lecturers, and also the students themselves based on their prior expreience from working in cvarious roles (as employees, volunteers, student assistants etc.). Through class discussion we aim to deepen the understanding of the
themes covered in the course. The current changes in organizaions brought about by Covid-19 will also be an important example which allows to illustrate and discuss many of the key concepts of the course.

Specifically, the course will cover the following topics:
- Work design: From Adam Smith to job crafting
- Effects of work design on performance and well-being
- Approaches to analyzing and designing work
- Modes of organizational change and change methods
- Balancing stability and flexibility in organizations as design criterium
- The organization-technology interaction and its impact on work design and organizational change
- Example Flexible working arrangements (e.g. home office)
- Strategic choices for work design

All through the course, students will be guided to work on their projects also, with about 25% of class time devoted to the projects. In the final session, students will present the main results of their projects and discuss main insights also across projects.
Lecture notesSlides for the lecture and a set of readings that cover the different parts of the lecture will be provided.
LiteratureA list of readings will be provided at the beginning of the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course includes the completion of a course project to be conducted in groups of four students. The project entails applying a particular method for analyzing and designing work processes and is carried out by means of interviews and observations in companies chosen by the students.
376-0121-00LMultiscale Bone Biomechanics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30
W6 credits4SR. Müller, X.‑H. Qin
AbstractThe seminar provides state-of-the-art insight to the biomechanical function of bone from molecules, to cells, tissue and up to the organ. Multiscale imaging and simulation allows linking different levels of hierarchy, where systems biology helps understanding the mechanobiological response of bone to loading and injury in scenarios relevant for personalized health and translational medicine.
ObjectiveThe learning objectives include 1. advanced knowledge of the state-of-the-are in multiscale bone biomechanics; 2. basic understanding of the biological principles governing bone in health, disease and treatment from molecules, to cells, tissue and up to the organ; 3. good understanding of the prevalent biomechanical testing and imaging techniques on the various levels of bone hierarchy; 4. practical implementation of state-of-the-art multiscale simulation techniques; 5. improved programing skills through the use of python; 6. hands on experience in designing solutions for clinical and industrial problems; 7. encouragement of critical thinking and creating an environment for independent and self-directed studying.
ContentBone is one of the most investigated biological materials due to its primary function of providing skeletal stability. Bone is susceptible to different local stimuli including mechanical forces and has great capabilities in adapting its mechanical properties to the changes in its environment. Nevertheless, aging or hormonal changes can make bone lose its ability to remodel appropriately, with loss of strength and increased fracture risk as a result, leading to devastating diseases such as osteoporosis. To better understand the biomechanical function of bone, one has to understand the hierarchical organization of this fascinating material down from the molecules, to the cells, tissue and up to the organ. Multiscale imaging and simulation allows to link these different levels of hierarchy. Incorporating systems biology approaches, not only biomechanical strength of the material can be assessed but also the mechanobiological response of the bone triggered by loading and injury in scenarios relevant for personalized health and translational medicine. Watching cells working together to build and repair bone in a coordinated fashion is a spectacle, which will need dynamic image content and deep discussions in the lecture room to probe the imagination of the individual student interested in the topic. For the seminar, concepts of video lectures will be used in a flipped class room setup, where students can study the basic biology, engineering and mathematical concepts in video tutorials online (TORQUES). All videos and animations will be incorporated in Moodle and PolyBook allowing studying and interactive course participation online. It is anticipated that the students need to prepare 2x45 minutes for the study of the actual lecture material. On the Friday afternoon, the first time slot (12-13) will be used for students, who want to schedule one-to-one meetings with the lecturer/tutors to discuss course content. In the later time slots (13-16), short clips with video/animation content will be used to introduce problems and discuss specific scientific findings using multiscale imaging and simulation technology in a flipped classroom. The students will have to form small groups to try to solve such problems and to present their solutions for advanced multiscale investigation of bone ranging from basic science to personalized health and onto translational medicine. Towards the end of the semester, students will have to present self-selected publications associated with the different topics of the lecture identified through PubMed or the Web of Science.
Lecture notesMaterial will be provided in Moodle and PolyBook.
Prerequisites / NoticePrior experience with the programming language python is beneficial but not mandatory. ETH offers courses for practical programming with python.
363-0790-00LTechnology Entrepreneurship Information W2 credits2VF. Hacklin
AbstractThis course aims to equip future leaders with strategies, frameworks and tools for understanding, analyzing and building technology ventures. In so doing, this course lays particular emphasis on providing an overview of various technology-related dimensions of the entrepreneurial journey, including founding, financing and growing a venture.
Objective- Understand both the tension and link between entrepreneurship and technology
- Evaluate cases of success and failure in technology ventures
- Discuss a variety of approaches and frameworks for building and growing technology ventures
- Interact with entrepreneurial leaders and gain insight into their entrepreneurial journey
- Experiment with building blocks and tools for analyzing, structuring and prototyping technology ventures
ContentMany industries are approaching, or find themselves in the midst of, dramatic structural changes. In many cases, such transformations are rooted in underlying technological shifts, such as digitization, nanoscale engineering, or 3D printing. Well known cases in point of affected sectors are in consumer electronics, media or manufacturing industries who are currently undergoing significant technology-driven disruptions. But also emerging shifts in the automotive sector or financial services give rise to severe questions of where and how the future value will be created and captured.
In a world characterized by disruption and change, technology ventures have taken a paramount role in significantly altering the global economic picture. As a consequence, there is a rising demand for complementing technological skills by entrepreneurial understanding.
Against this background, this course aims to equip future leaders with strategies, frameworks and tools for understanding, analyzing and building technology ventures. In so doing, this course lays particular emphasis on providing an overview of various technology-related dimensions of the entrepreneurial journey, including founding, financing and growing a venture.

See course website: Link
Lecture notes- Lecture slides, cases and additional learning material provided during the course
376-0130-00LLaboratory Course in Exercise Physiology Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 32.

HST: Possible from the 5th semester on,
W3 credits4PC. Spengler
AbstractConduct physical performance tests and measurements that are typically used to assess performance of athletes and/or patients and that deepen the understanding of physiological processes in response to physical exertion.
ObjectiveGain hands-on experience in exercise physiology and consolidate knowledge on physiological adaptations to different types and degrees of physical activity and climatic influences. Learn fundamental assessment techniques of the muscular system, the cardio-respiratory system and of whole-body performance, learn scientifically correct data analysis and interpretation of results. Insight into today's Sports Medicine.
ContentLaboratory course:
Various exercise tests assessing human performance and assessments of physiological responses to activity (examples are VO2max-test, Conconi-Tests, Determination of anaerobic threshold, Cooper-Test, 1-repetition maximum test, lactate minimum test), dynamometry, mechanography, body composition etc.). Insight into measurements in Sports Medicine.
Lecture notesTutorial on Laboratory Experiments in Exercise Physiology
(Editor: Exercise Physiology Lab)
LiteratureSchmidt/Lang/Heckmann: Physiologie des Menschen, Springer-Verlag, Heidelberg

Kenney/Wilmore/Costill: Physiology of Sport and Exercise, Human Kinetics
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisite:
Anatomy and physiology classes and lab course in physiology successfully completed (BWS students please contact C. M. Spengler)

Desirable:
Exercise Physiology Lecture (concomitantly or passed; is selection criterion in case of more applications than lab spaces)
376-0203-00LMovement and Sport Biomechanics Information W4 credits3GB. Taylor, R. List
AbstractLearning to view the human body as a (bio-) mechanical system. Making the connections between everyday movements and sports activity with injury, discomfort, prevention and rehabilitation.
ObjectiveStudents are able to describe the human body as a mechanical system.
They analyse and describe human movement according to the laws of mechanics.
ContentMovement- and sports biomechanics deals with the attributes of the human body and their link to mechanics. The course includes topics such as functional anatomy, biomechanics of daily activities (gait, running, etc.) and looks at movement in sport from a mechanical point of view. Furthermore, simple reflections on the loading analysis of joints in various situations are discussed. Additionally, questions covering the statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, and inverse dynamics, relevant to biomechanics are investigated.
Prerequisites / NoticeLanguage of teaching in this course is German/English depending on the teacher
376-0207-00LExercise PhysiologyW4 credits3GC. Spengler, R. M. Rossi
AbstractThis course provides an overview over molecular and systemic aspects of neuromuscular, cardiovascular and respiratory adaptations to acute and chronic exercise as well as the interactions of the different systems influencing factors, e.g. genetics, gender, age, altitude/depth, heat/cold, with respect to performance and health.
ObjectiveThe aim of this course is to understand molecular and systemic aspects of neuromuscular, cardiovascular and respiratory adaptations to acute and chronic exercise as well as the interaction of the different systems regarding health-relevant aspects and performance in healthy people and persons with selected diseases. Furthermore, students will understand the influence of genetics, gender, age, altitude/depth, heat and cold on the named factors.
ContentHistory of Exercise Physiology, research methods, fibertype heterogeneity and its functional significance, neural control of muscle force, molecular nad cellular mechanisms of muscle adaptation to resistance, endurance and stretching exercise, interindividual variability in the response to training, cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses to acute and chronic exercise, sexi differences relevant to exercise performance, exercise in hot and cold environment, children and adolescents in sport and exercise, exercise at altitude and depth, aging and exercise performance, exercise for health, exercise in the context of disease.
Lecture notesOnline material is provided during the course.
LiteratureWird in der Vorlesung bekannt gegeben.
Prerequisites / NoticeAnatomy and Physiology I + II
376-1033-00LHistory of SportsW2 credits2VM. Gisler
AbstractComprehension for development and changes of sports from the ancient world to the presence. Description of sports in services of national idea, from education and health promotion from the middle of the 18th century till this day.
ObjectiveUnderstanding for the development and adaptation of sports from the ancient world to present times.
ContentKurzüberblick über Antike bis frühe Neuzeit. Darstellung des Sports im Dienst nationaler Ideen, von Bildung und Erziehung, der Gesundheitsförderung von der Mitte des 18. Jahrhunderts bis heute.Überblick über die Geschichte der Olympischen Spiele in der Antike und Gegenwart.
Lecture notesEin Skript für die aktuelle Veranstaltung wird abgegeben.
LiteratureLiteraturangaben für eine Vertiefung der Inhalte werden im Skript gemacht. Die Anschaffung von Spezialliteratur ist allerdings nicht notwendig.
376-1107-00LSport PedagogyW2 credits2VC. Herrmann
AbstractThe teacher-student interaction presents a complex psychosocial event, demonstrating the need for a psychological extension of the classical social science / sports pedagogical perspective. Therefore, this lecture will be focused on "pedagogical-psychological aspects of competence development in the context of a multi-perspective physical education".
ObjectiveDevelopment of pedagogical-psychological competences for the optimisation of future teaching activities.
Content- Subject area of educational psychology
- Motivating students in physical education
- Building self-efficacy and strengthen the self-concept
- Promoting positive emotions and a positive attitude to anxiety
- Encouraging self-directed learning
- Leading classes and promoting cooperation
- Communicating with students efficiently
- Reflecting your own expectations critically
- Handling gender issues sensitively
- Promoting inclusion / Strengthening social and moral development
- Dealing with difficult students
- Evaluating achievements of students
Lecture notesTeaching materials for the individual lectures are provided to the students via moodle.
LiteraturePrimärliteratur:
Gerber, M. (2014). Pädagogische Psychologie im Sportunterricht. Ein Lehrbuch in 14 Lektionen. Aachen: Meyer & Meyer Verlag.
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