Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Environmental Engineering Bachelor Information
5. Semester
Elective Blocks
Elective Block: Energy
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
529-0193-00LRenewable Energy Technologies I
Does not take place this semester.
The lectures Renewable Energy Technologies I (529-0193-00L) and Renewable Energy Technologies II (529-0191-01L) can be taken independently from one another.
W4 credits3GA. Wokaun, A. Steinfeld
AbstractScenarios for world energy demand and CO2 emissions, implications for climate. Methods for the assessment of energy chains. Potential and technology of renewable energies: Biomass (heat, electricity, biofuels), solar energy (low temp. heat, solar thermal and photovoltaic electricity, solar chemistry). Wind and ocean energy, heat pumps, geothermal energy, energy from waste. CO2 sequestration.
ObjectiveScenarios for the development of world primary energy consumption are introduced. Students know the potential and limitations of renewable energies for reducing CO2 emissions, and their contribution towards a future sustainable energy system that respects climate protection goals.
ContentScenarios for the development of world energy consumption, energy intensity and economic development. Energy conversion chains, primary energy sources and availability of raw materials. Methods for the assessment of energy systems, ecological balances and life cycle analysis of complete energy chains. Biomass: carbon reservoirs and the carbon cycle, energetic utilisation of biomass, agricultural production of energy carriers, biofuels. Solar energy: solar collectors, solar-thermal power stations, solar chemistry, photovoltaics, photochemistry. Wind energy, wind power stations. Ocean energy (tides, waves). Geothermal energy: heat pumps, hot steam and hot water resources, hot dry rock (HDR) technique. Energy recovery from waste. Greenhouse gas mitigation, CO2 sequestration, chemical bonding of CO2. Consequences of human energy use for ecological systems, atmosphere and climate.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be distributed electronically during the course.
Literature- Kaltschmitt, M., Wiese, A., Streicher, W.: Erneuerbare Energien (Springer, 2003)

- Tester, J.W., Drake, E.M., Golay, M.W., Driscoll, M.J., Peters, W.A.: Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options (MIT Press, 2005)

- G. Boyle, Renewable Energy: Power for a sustainable futureOxford University Press, 3rd ed., 2012, ISBN: 978-0-19-954533-9

-V. Quaschning, Renewable Energy and Climate ChangeWiley- IEEE, 2010, ISBN: 978-0-470-74707-0, 9781119994381 (online)
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of chemistry, physics and thermodynamics are a prerequisite for this course.

Topics are available to carry out a Project Work (Semesterarbeit) on the contents of this course.
227-1631-00LEnergy System Analysis Information W4 credits3GG. Hug, S. Hellweg, F. Noembrini, A. Schlüter
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the methods and tools for analysis of energy consumption, energy production and energy flows. Environmental aspects are included as well as economical considerations. Different sectors of the society are discussed, such as electric power, buildings, and transportation. Models for energy system analysis planning are introduced.
ObjectiveThe purpose of the course is to give the participants an overview of the methods and tools used for energy systems analysis and how to use these in simple practical examples.
ContentThe course gives an introduction to methods and tools for analysis of energy consumption, energy production and energy flows. Both larger systems, e.g. countries, and smaller systems, e.g. industries, homes, vehicles, are studied. The tools and methods are applied to various problems during the exercises. Different conventions of energy statistics used are introduced.

The course provides also an introduction to energy systems models for developing scenarios of future energy consumption and production. Bottom-up and Top-Down approaches are addressed and their features and applications discussed.

The course contains the following parts:
Part I: Energy flows and energy statistics
Part II: Environmental impacts
Part III: Electric power systems
Part IV: Energy in buildings
Part V: Energy in transportation
Part VI: Energy systems models
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureExcerpts from various books, e.g. K. Blok: Introduction to Energy Analysis, Techne Press, Amsterdam 2006, ISBN 90-8594-016-8
  •  Page  1  of  1