Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Biology Bachelor Information
3. Year, 5. Semester
Concept Courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
701-2413-00LEvolutionary GeneticsW6 credits4VT. Städler, A. Widmer, P. C. Brunner, M. Fischer
AbstractThe concept course 'Evolutionary Genetics' consists of two lectures that jointly provide an introduction to the fields of population and quantitative genetics (emphasis on basic concepts) and ecological genetics (more emphasis on evolutionary and ecological processes of adaptation and speciation).
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to provide students with a solid introduction to the fields of population genetics, quantitative genetics, and ecological genetics. The concepts and research methods developed in these fields have undergone profound transformations; they are of fundamental importance in our understanding of evolutionary processes, both past and present. Students should gain an appreciation for the concepts, methods and explanatory power of evolutionary genetics.
ContentPopulation genetics - Types and sources of genetic variation; randomly mating populations and the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium; effects of inbreeding; natural selection; random genetic drift and effective population size; gene flow and hierarchical population structure; molecular population genetics: neutral theory of molecular evolution and basics of coalescent theory.
Quantitative genetics - Continuous variation; measurement of quant. characters; genes, environments and their interactions; measuring their influence; response to selection; inbreeding and crossbreeding, effects on fitness; Fisher's fundamental theorem.
Ecological Genetics - Concepts and methods for the study of genetic variation and its role in adaptation, reproductive isolation, hybridization and speciation
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureHamilton, M.B. 2009. Population Genetics. Wiley-Blackwell, Chichester, U.K.
Prerequisites / NoticeThere will be 5 optional extra sessions for the population genetics part (following lectures 2-6) for computer simulations, designed to help understand the course material.
551-0307-00LMolecular and Structural Biology I: Protein Structure and Function Information
D-BIOL students are obliged to take part I and part II (next semester) as a two-semester course
W3 credits2VR. Glockshuber, K. Locher, E. Weber-Ban
AbstractBiophysics of protein folding, membrane proteins and biophysics of membranes, enzymatic catalysis, catalytic RNA and RNAi, current topics in protein biophysics and structural biology.
ObjectiveUnderstanding of structure-function relationships in proteins and in protein folding, detailed understanding of biophysics and physical methods as well as modern methods for protein purification and microanalytics.
Lecture notesScripts on the individual topics can be found under http://www.mol.biol.ethz.ch/teaching.
LiteratureBasics:
- Creighton, T.E., Proteins, Freeman, (1993)
- Fersht, A., Enzyme, Structure and Mechanism in Protein Science (1999), Freeman.
- Berg, Tymoczko, Stryer: Biochemistry (5th edition), Freeman (2001).

Current topics: References will be given during the lectures.

.
551-0309-00LConcepts in Modern GeneticsW6 credits4VY. Barral, D. Bopp, A. Hajnal, M. Stoffel, O. Voinnet
AbstractConcepts of modern genetics and genomics, including principles of classical genetics; yeast genetics; gene mapping; forward and reverse genetics; structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes; molecular mechanisms and regulation of transcription, replication, DNA-repair and recombination; analysis of developmental processes; epigenetics and RNA interference.
ObjectiveThis course focuses on the concepts of classical and modern genetics and genomics.
ContentThe topics include principles of classical genetics; yeast genetics; gene mapping; forward and reverse genetics; structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes; molecular mechanisms and regulation of transcription, replication, DNA-repair and recombination; analysis of developmental processes; epigenetics and RNA interference.
Lecture notesScripts and additional material will be provided during the semester.
551-0311-00LMolecular Life of Plants Information W6 credits4VW. Gruissem, A. Rodriguez-Villalon, C. Sánchez-Rodríguez, O. Voinnet, S. C. Zeeman
AbstractThe advanced course introduces students to plants through a concept-based discussion of developmental processes that integrates physiology and biochemistry with genetics, molecular biology, and cell biology. The course follows the life of the plant, starting with the seed, progressing through germination to the seedling and mature plant, and ending with reproduction and senescence.
ObjectiveThe new course "Molecular Life of Plants" reflects the rapid advcances that are occurring in the field of experimental plant biology as well as the changing interests of students being trained in this discipline. Contemporary plant biology courses emphasize a traditional approach to experimental plant biology by discussing discrete topics that are removed from the context of the plant life cycle. The course will take an integrative approach that focuses on developmental concepts. Whereas traditional plant physiology courses were based on research carried out on intact plants or plant organs and were often based on phenomenological observations, current research in plant biology emphasizes work at the cellular, subcellular and molecular levels.

The goal of "Molecular Life of Plants" is to train students in integrative approaches to understand the function of plants in a developmental context. While the course focuses on plants, the training integrative approaches will also be useful for other organisms.
ContentThe course "Molecular Life of Plants" will cover the following topics in a developmental context:

Plant genome organization
Seed anatomy
Food reserves and mobilization
Seedling emergence
Heterotrophic to autotrophic growth
Chlorophyll biosynthesis, photoreceptors
Integration of metabolism
Hormones
Cell cycle
Cell differentiation and expansion
Environmental interactions—abiotic
Environmental interactions—biotic
Flower development and fertilization
Embryo and seed development
Fruit development
Senescence
551-0313-00LMicrobiology (Part I) Information W3 credits2VW.‑D. Hardt, L. Eberl, H.‑M. Fischer, J. Piel, M. Pilhofer
AbstractAdvanced lecture class providing a broad overview on bacterial cell structure, genetics, metabolism, symbiosis and pathogenesis.
ObjectiveThis concept class will be based on common concepts and introduce to the enormous diversity among bacteria and archaea. It will cover the current research on bacterial cell structure, genetics, metabolism, symbiosis and pathogenesis.
ContentAdvanced class covering the state of the research in bacterial cell structure, genetics, metabolism, symbiosis and pathogenesis.
Lecture notesUpdated handouts will be provided during the class.
LiteratureCurrent literature references will be provided during the lectures.
Prerequisites / NoticeEnglish
The lecture "Grundlagen der Biologie II: Mikrobiologie" is the basis for this advanced lecture.
551-0319-00LCellular Biochemistry (Part I) Information W3 credits2VU. Kutay, R. I. Enchev, B. Kornmann, M. Peter, I. Zemp, further lecturers
AbstractConcepts and molecular mechanisms underlying the biochemistry of the cell, providing advanced insights into structure, function and regulation of individual cell components. Particular emphasis will be put on the spatial and temporal integration of different molecules and signaling pathways into global cellular processes such as intracellular transport, cell division & growth, and cell migration.
ObjectiveThe full-year course (551-0319-00 & 551-0320-00) focuses on the molecular mechanisms and concepts underlying the biochemistry of cellular physiology, investigating how these processes are integrated to carry out highly coordinated cellular functions. The molecular characterisation of complex cellular functions requires a combination of approaches such as biochemistry, but also cell biology and genetics. This course is therefore the occasion to discuss these techniques and their integration in modern cellular biochemistry.
The students will be able to describe the structural and functional details of individual cell components, and the spatial and temporal regulation of their interactions. In particular, they will learn to explain the integration of different molecules and signaling pathways into complex and highly dynamic cellular processes such as intracellular transport, cytoskeletal rearrangements, cell motility, cell division and cell growth. In addition, they will be able to illustrate the relevance of particular signaling pathways for cellular pathologies such as cancer.
ContentStructural and functional details of individual cell components, regulation of their interactions, and various aspects of the regulation and compartmentalisation of biochemical processes.
Topics include: biophysical and electrical properties of membranes; viral membranes; structural and functional insights into intracellular transport and targeting; vesicular trafficking and phagocytosis; post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression.
Lecture notesScripts and additional material will be provided during the semester. Please contact Dr. Alicia Smith for assistance with the learning materials. (alicia.smith@bc.biol.ethz.ch)
LiteratureRecommended supplementary literature (review articles and selected primary literature) will be provided during the course.
Prerequisites / NoticeTo attend this course the students must have a solid basic knowledge in chemistry, biochemistry and general biology. The course will be taught in English.
529-0731-00LNucleic Acids and CarbohydratesW6 credits3GD. Hilvert, P. A. Kast, S. J. Sturla, H. Wennemers
AbstractStructure, function and chemistry of nucleic acids and carbohydrates. DNA/RNA structure and synthesis; recombinant DNA technology and PCR; DNA arrays and genomics; antisense approach and RNAi; polymerases and transcription factors; catalytic RNA; DNA damage and repair; carbohydrate structure and synthesis; carbohydrate arrays; cell surface engineering; carbohydrate vaccines
ObjectiveStructure, function and chemistry of nucleic acids and carbohydrates. DNA/RNA structure and synthesis; recombinant DNA technology and PCR; DNA arrays and genomics; antisense approach and RNAi; polymerases and transcription factors; catalytic RNA; DNA damage and repair; carbohydrate structure and synthesis; carbohydrate arrays; cell surface engineering; carbohydrate vaccines
ContentStructure, function and chemistry of nucleic acids and carbohydrates. DNA/RNA structure and synthesis; recombinant DNA technology and PCR; DNA arrays and genomics; antisense approach and RNAi; polymerases and transcription factors; catalytic RNA; DNA damage and repair; carbohydrate structure and synthesis; carbohydrate arrays; cell surface engineering; carbohydrate vaccines
Lecture notesNo script; illustrations from the original literature relevant to the individual lectures will be provided weekly (typically as handouts downloadable from the Moodle server).
LiteratureMainly based on original literature, a detailed list will be distributed during the lecture
551-0317-00LImmunology I Information W3 credits2VA. Oxenius, M. Kopf
AbstractIntroduction into structural and functional aspects of the immune system.
Basic knowledge of the mechanisms and the regulation of an immune response.
ObjectiveIntroduction into structural and functional aspects of the immune system.
Basic knowledge of the mechanisms and the regulation of an immune response.
Content- Introduction and historical background
- Innate and adaptive immunity, Cells and organs of the immune system
- B cells and antibodies
- Generation of diversity
- Antigen presentation and Major Histoincompatibility (MHC) antigens
- Thymus and T cell selection
- Autoimmunity
- Cytotoxic T cells and NK cells
- Th1 and Th2 cells, regulatory T cells
- Allergies
- Hypersensitivities
- Vaccines, immune-therapeutic interventions
Lecture notesElectronic access to the documentation will be provided. The link can be found at "Lernmaterialien"
Literature- Kuby, Immunology, 7th edition, Freemen + Co., New York, 2009
Prerequisites / NoticeImmunology I (WS) and Immunology II (SS) will be examined as one learning entity in a "Sessionsprüfung".
376-1305-10LNeurobiology Information W6 credits4VG. Schratt, E. Stoeckli, L. Filli, W. von der Behrens, further lecturers
AbstractDevelopment of the nervous system (NS); the adult NS, plasticity and regeneration, sensory systems, cognitive functions, learning and memory, molecular and cellular mechanisms, animal models, diseases of the NS.
ObjectiveOverview of normal development, plasticity and regeneration of the nervous system based on molecular, cellular and biochemical approaches.
ContentDevelopment: Early development of the nervous system, cellular level, nerve fiber growth, building of neuronal networks; biology of the adult nervous system; structural plasticity of the adult nervous system, regeneration and repair: networks and nerve fibers, regeneration, pathological loss of cells.
Lecture notesStructure, Plasticity and Repair of the Nervous System (376-1305-01L): Lecture notes will be provided on Moodle https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=694
Password will be provided at the beginning of the lecture.

Development of the Nervous System (376-1305-00L): Lecture notes will be provided on OLAT https://www.olat.uzh.ch/olat/dmz/
LiteratureThe lecture requires reading of book chapters, handouts and original scientific papers. Further information will be given in the individual lectures.
Block Courses
Registration for Block courses is mandatory. Please register under https://www.uzh.ch/zoolmed/ssl-dir/Blockkurse_UNIETH.php . Registration period: from 24.7.2017 to 6.8.2017.
Block Courses in 1st Quarter of the Semester
From 19.9.2017 13:00 hr to 11.10.2017 17:00 hr
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-0333-00LBiodiversity and Ecological Significance of Fungi Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 8.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7PA. Leuchtmann, R. Berndt, B. Senn-Irlet
AbstractIntroduction to the biology, systematics and ecology of the important fungal groups. The participants will study primarily fungal materials that they collect during field excursions or that they isolate in the laboratory.
ObjectiveKnowledge of characteristics, life style and ecological significance of major fungal and fungal-like groups. Become acquainted with methods for collecting, microscopic examination and identificaton of fungi.
ContentDie Studierenden lernen die Merkmale und Besonderheiten der Pilze und pilzartigen Organismen kennen und erhalten einen Überblick über die Systematik der Ascomycota und Basidiomycota, und eventuell weiterer ausgewählter Gruppen. Die Ökologie der Pilze wird anhand von ausgewählten Pilzgemeinschaften (z.B. Holz- und Streueabbauer, Dungbewohner, Endophyten) vorgestellt. Im Rahmen eines kleinen Projekts befassen sich die Teilnehmer/innen mit pflanzenparasitischen Pilzen (vor allem Rost- und Mehltaupilzen) und lernen, wie man diese Pilze findet, mikroskopiert und bestimmt.

Auf mehreren Exkursionenen werden wir die Vielfalt und Ökologie der Pilze am natürlichen Standort studieren. Die Exkursionen dienen auch dem Sammeln von Material, an dem wir im Kurs die Mikroskopie und Präparation der Pilze üben werden.
Lecture notesÜbersichten und Skriptunterlagen zum Kursstoff werden abgegeben.
LiteratureWebster, J., and Weber, R. W. S. 2007. Introduction to Fungi. Cambridge University Press, Oxford, 3rd edition, 841 S.

Alexopoulos, C. J., Mims, C. W., and Blackwell, M. 1996. Introductory Mycology. John Wiley & Sons, 4th ed., 868 S.

Dix, N. J., Webster, J. 1995. Fungal Ecology. Chapman & Hall, London, 549 S.
551-0347-00LMolecular Mechanisms of Cell Growth and Polarity Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 12.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GR. Kroschewski, Y. Barral, S. Jessberger, M. Peter
AbstractIntroduction to the principles and molecular mechanisms of cell polarity, using animal cells and fungi as model systems.
ObjectiveThe students learn to describe the principles and molecular mechanisms of cell polarity, using different model systems as examples:
- Animal cells during epithelial and neuronal differentiation
- Fungi during morphogenesis and aging.
Based on lectures, literature reading, discussions, presentations and practical lab work the students will be able to compare experimental strategies in different model systems, and to develop open questions in the field of cell polarity. Students will also know about the mechanisms and consequences of asymmetric cell division such as those performed by stem cells and asymmetric protein functions during morphogenesis and aging.
ContentDuring this Block-Course, the students will learn to
(1) describe and compare the principles and molecular mechanisms of cell polarity in fungi and animal cells,
(2) apply, evaluate and compare experimental strategies in the different model systems, and
(3) select the best model system to answer a particular question.

Students - in groups of 2 or max 3- will be integrated into a research project connected to the subject of the course, within one of the participating research groups.

Lectures and technical notes will be given and informal discussions held to provide you with the theoretical background.
Lecture notesThere will be optional papers to be read before the course start. They serve as framework orientation for the practical parts of this block course and will be made accessible to you shortly before the course starts on the relevant Moodle site.
LiteratureDocumentation and recommended literature (review articles) will be provided during the course.
551-1129-00LUnderstanding and Engineering Microbial Metabolism Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 6.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7PJ. Vorholt-Zambelli
AbstractThis laboratory course has a focus on current research topics in our laboratory related to metabolic engineering, the general understanding of metabolism, and is focused particularly on C1-metabolism. Projects will be conducted in small groups.
ObjectiveThe course aims at introducing key principles of metabolic engineering and techniques applied in metabolism related research. The main focus of this block course is on practical work and will familiarize participants with complementary approaches, in particular genetic, biochemical and analytical techniques. Results will be presented by students in scientific presentations.
ContentThe course and will include topics such as pathway elucidation & engineering and related ongoing research projects in the lab. Experimental work applied during the course will comprise methods such as cloning work & transformation, growth determination, enzyme activity assays, liquid-chromatography mass-spectrometry and dynamic labeling experiments.
Lecture notesNone
LiteratureWill be provided at the beginning of the course.
551-1711-00LTranslational Medicine and Bio-Entrepreneurship Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 30
The block course will only take place with a minimum of 10 participants.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GU. K. Genick, E. Hafen, M. Jenni
AbstractThe course gives students a look at the entire drug development process from bench to bedside. ETH and UZH alumni from the pharma, biotech, medtech, digital health and venture capital industry will discuss how intellectual property, regulatory and financial aspects shape this process. Student teams will develop their own business idea and pitch it to a group of entrepreneurs and investors.
ObjectiveStudents know the basis of the drug development process, the basis of patenting and what is required to the start a life science company. The can develop a business idea and a rough financial plan and they can it to a panel of experts.
551-1119-00LMicrobial Community Genomics and Transcriptomics Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 5.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GS. Sunagawa
AbstractIntroduction to current research methods in the analysis of microbial communities using Next Generation Sequencing approaches - metagenomics and metatranscriptomics. Practical experience of work in a computational laboratory and an introduction to scientific programming.
ObjectiveGain skills in data analysis and presentation for oral and written reports. Lectures introducing state-of-the-art in respective research areas and community microbiology, which is the target of ongoing research. Start to assess current literature.
Block Courses in 2nd Quarter of the Semester
From 12.10.2017 08:00 Uhr to 3.11.2017 17:00 hr
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
551-0345-00LMechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 9.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7PW.‑D. Hardt, M. Diard, B. Nguyen
AbstractResearch laboratory class in small groups. Research projects on current topics in cellular microbiology and bacterial pathogenesis are assigned to each student.
ObjectiveIntroduction to a current topic in cellular microbiology and/or molecular genetics of a bacterial pathogen. Experimental work in the research lab and introduction to the current lab techniques. Work with the current research literature in bacterial pathogenesis. Writing of a research protocol.
Requirement for obtaining the credit points: oral presentation of the research project and evaluation of the research protocol.
ContentResearch projects on the model pathogen Salmonella.
Lecture notesnone.
LiteratureLiterature will be selected with reference to the assigned research project.
551-0421-00LBiology and Ecology of Fungi in Forests Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 10.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GI. L. Brunner, S. H. Egli, D. H. Rigling
AbstractIntroduction of the biological and ecological basics of fungi in forests. Focusing on mycorrhizal, saprobic, and pathogenic fungi and their functional relevance in the forest ecosystems. To get to know current methodological research approaches on the basis of selected examples with practical works in forest and lab as well as excursions and lectures.
ObjectiveKnowledge of the fungi of forest and its ecological significance. Knowing of current methodological research approaches. Self-reliant and deepened activities of selected topics of fungi from forests.
ContentIntroduction of the biological and ecological basics of fungi in forests. Focusing on mycorrhizal, saprobic, and pathogenic fungi and their functional relevance in the forest ecosystems. To get to know current methodological research approaches on the basis of selected examples with practical works in forest and lab as well as excursions and lectures.
Lecture notesUnterlagen zum Kurs werden abgegeben.
LiteratureBreitenbach J, Kränzlin F. 1980-2005. Pilze der Schweiz, Bände 1-6.
Flammer R, Horak E. 2003. Giftpilze-Pilzgifte. Schwabe, Basel.
Flück M. 2006. Pilzführer Schweiz. Haupt, Bern.
Smith S.E, Read D.J. 1997. Mycorrhizal Symbiosis. Academic Press, 2nd ed.
Prerequisites / NoticeDer Blockkurs findet an der Eidg. Forschungsanstalt WSL in Birmensdorf statt. Der Wald vor der Haustüre des Institutes macht diesen Kurs besonders praxisnah.

Erreichbarkeit mit Tram 14 bis Triemli, danach PTT-Bus 220 oder 350 bis Birmensdorf Sternen/WSL, oder mit S9 bis Birmensdorf SBB und mit PTT-Bus eine Station in Richtung Zürich bis Birmensdorf Sternen/WSL.
551-0359-00LPlant Biochemistry Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 15.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GS. C. Zeeman, B. Pfister
AbstractIn this block course, students actively participate in ongoing research projects on plant metabolism and are tutored individually by doctoral students and postdocs. In a lecture series, the theoretical background of the projects and their interrelationship is provided. Finally, students discuss their projects and results during a poster session.
ObjectiveIn this block course, students actively participate in ongoing research projects on plant metabolism and are tutored individually by doctoral students and postdocs.
ContentParticipation in the following research projects will be possible: Photosynthetic metabolism; how is photo-assimilated carbon allocated to sustain plant growth? Chloroplast biology; how is chloroplast function integrated with that to the whole cell? Starch biosynthesis and degradation; how are complex, semi-crystalline starch granules made from simple sugars, and once made, how are they degraded again to release the stored carbohydrate? Regulation of metabolism through protein-protein interaction; how and why do proteins involved in starch metabolism interact with each other to form multi-subunit enzymes and multi-enzyme complexes? Sugar sensing; How does a plant know how much sugar it has, and how does this influence development.
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureDescriptions of the possible projects including individual reading assignments will be handed out beforehand.
551-1513-00LCancer Cell Signaling: Mechanisms, Targets and Therapeutic Approaches Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 10.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GW. Krek, W. Kovacs
AbstractThis course will consider the pathogenetic landscape of cancer, explore how abnormalities of cellular informationmanagement cause cancer and demonstrate how the integrated application of modern omics technologies, mouse cancer models and human pathology provides a foundation for developing individualized cancer therapeutics. The course combines practical work with discussions and presentations.
ObjectiveInsights into and overview about the genetic alterations that underlie different cancer types, the complex cancer cell circuitries governing tumor development, modern approaches used in contemporary basic and translational cancer research and sophisticated strategies to control individual cancers and combat drug resistance.
551-1147-00LBioactive Natural Products from Bacteria Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 8.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GJ. Piel
AbstractLab course. In small groups projects of relevance to current research questions in the field of bacterial natural product biosynthesis are addressed.
ObjectiveIntroduction to relevant subjects of the secondary metabolism of bacteria. Training in practical work in a research laboratory. Scientific writing in form of a research report.
ContentResearch project on bacteria that produce bioactive natural products (e.g., Streptomycetes, Cyanobacteria, uncultivated bacteria). The techniques used will depend on the project, e.g. PCR, cloning, natural product analysis, precursor feeding studies, enzyme expression and analysis.
Lecture notesnone.
LiteratureWill be provided for each of the projects at the beginning of the course.
551-0351-00LMembrane Biology Information Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 21.

The enrolment is done by the D-BIOL study administration.
W6 credits7GV. Korkhov, Y. Barral, B. Kornmann, U. Kutay, A. Rodriguez-Villalon, G. Schertler
AbstractThe course will introduce the students to the key concepts in membrane biology and will allow them to be involved in laboratory projects related to that broad field. The course will consist of lectures, literature discussions, and practical laboratory work in small groups. Results of the practical projects will be presented during the poster session at the end of the course.
ObjectiveThe aim of the course is to expose the students to a wide range of modern research areas encompassed by the field of membrane biology.
ContentStudents will be engaged in research projects aimed at understanding the biological membranes at the molecular, organellar and cellular levels. Students will design and perform experiments, evaluate experimental results, analyze the current scientific literature and understand the relevance of their work in the context of the current state of the membrane biology field.
Lecture notesNo script
LiteratureThe recommended literature, including reviews and primary research articles, will be provided during the course
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course will be taught in English. All general lectures will be held at ETH Hoenggerberg; special lectures will be organized by individual participating groups. Students will be divided into small groups to carry out experiments at ETH or at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Travel to the Paul Scherrer Insitute will be organized by car rental or public transportation.
  •  Page  1  of  2 Next page Last page     All