Search result: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2017

Energy Science and Technology Master Information
Core Subjects
Compulsory core courses
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
151-1633-00LEnergy Conversion
This course is intended for students outside of D-MAVT.
O4 credits3GH. G. Park
AbstractFundamentals of Thermal Sciences in association with Energy Conversion
ObjectiveTo become acquainted and familiarized with basic principles of fundamental thermal sciences (Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, etc.) as well as their linkage to energy conversion technologies.
ContentThermodynamics (first and second laws), Heat Transfer (conduction/convection/radiation), Technical Applications
Lecture notesSlides will be distributed by e-mail every week.
Literature1. Introduction to Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer, 2nd ed. by Cengel, Y. A., McGraw Hill;
2. Fundamentals of Engineering Thermodynamics, 6th ed. by Moran & Shapiro, Wiley
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is intended for students outside of D-MAVT.
227-1631-00LEnergy System Analysis Information W4 credits3GG. Hug, S. Hellweg, F. Noembrini, A. Schlüter
AbstractThe course provides an introduction to the methods and tools for analysis of energy consumption, energy production and energy flows. Environmental aspects are included as well as economical considerations. Different sectors of the society are discussed, such as electric power, buildings, and transportation. Models for energy system analysis planning are introduced.
ObjectiveThe purpose of the course is to give the participants an overview of the methods and tools used for energy systems analysis and how to use these in simple practical examples.
ContentThe course gives an introduction to methods and tools for analysis of energy consumption, energy production and energy flows. Both larger systems, e.g. countries, and smaller systems, e.g. industries, homes, vehicles, are studied. The tools and methods are applied to various problems during the exercises. Different conventions of energy statistics used are introduced.

The course provides also an introduction to energy systems models for developing scenarios of future energy consumption and production. Bottom-up and Top-Down approaches are addressed and their features and applications discussed.

The course contains the following parts:
Part I: Energy flows and energy statistics
Part II: Environmental impacts
Part III: Electric power systems
Part IV: Energy in buildings
Part V: Energy in transportation
Part VI: Energy systems models
Lecture notesHandouts
LiteratureExcerpts from various books, e.g. K. Blok: Introduction to Energy Analysis, Techne Press, Amsterdam 2006, ISBN 90-8594-016-8
227-0122-00LIntroduction to Electric Power Transmission: System & TechnologyO6 credits4GC. Franck, G. Hug
AbstractIntroduction to theory and technology of electric power transmission systems.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, the student will be able to: describe the structure of electric power systems, name the most important components and describe what they are needed for, apply models for transformers and lines, explain the technology of overhead power lines, calculate stationary power flows, current and voltage transients and other basic parameters in simple power systems.
ContentStructure of electric power systems, transformer and power line models, analysis of and power flow calculation in basic systems, symmetrical and unsymmetrical three-phase systems, transient current and voltage processes, technology and principle of electric power systems.
Lecture notesLecture script in English, exercises and sample solutions, translation of important vocabulary: english-german.
Elective Core Courses
These courses are particularly recommended, other ETH-courses from the field of Energy Science and Technology at large may be chosen in accordance with your tutor.
NumberTitleTypeECTSHoursLecturers
101-0577-00LAn Introduction to Sustainable Development in the Built EnvironmentW3 credits2GG. Habert
AbstractIn 2015, the UN Conference in Paris shaped future world objectives to tackle climate change.
in 2016, other political bodies made these changes more difficult to predict.
What does it mean for the built environment?
This course provides an introduction to the notion of sustainable development when applied to our built environment
ObjectiveAt the end of the semester, the students have an understanding of the term of sustainable development, its history, the current political and scientific discourses and its relevance for our built environment.

In order to address current challenges of climate change mitigation and resource depletion, students will learn a holistic approach of sustainable development. Ecological, economical and social constraints will be presented and students will learn about methods for argumentation and tools for assessment (i.e. life cycle assessment).

For this purpose an overview of sustainable development is presented with an introduction to the history of sustainability and its today definition as well as the role of cities, urbanisation and material resources (i.e. energy, construction material) in social economic and environmetal aspects.

The course aims to promote an integral view and understanding of sustainability and describing different spheres (social/cultural, ecological, economical, and institutional) that influence our built environment.

Students will acquire critical knowledge and understand the role of involved stakeholders, their motivations and constraints, learn how to evaluate challenges, identify deficits and define strategies to promote a more sustainable construction.

After the course students should be able to define the relevance of specific local, regional or territorial aspects to achieve coherent and applicable solutions toward sustainable development.

The course offers an environmental, socio-economic and socio-technical perspective focussing on buildings, cities and their transition to resilience with sustainable development. Students will learn on theory and application of current scientific pathways towards sustainable development.
ContentThe following topics give an overview of the themes that are to be worked on during the lecture.

- Overview on the history and emergence of sustainable development
- Overview on the current understanding and definition of sustainable development

Methods
- Method 1: Life cycle assessment (planning, construction, operation/use, deconstruction)
- Method 2: Life Cycle Costing
- Method 3: Labels and certification

Main issues:
- Operation energy at building, urban and national scale
- Mobility and density questions
- Embodied energy for developing and developed world

- Synthesis: Transition to sustainable development
Lecture notesAll relevant information will be online available before the lectures. For each lecture slides of the lecture will be provided.
LiteratureA list of the basic literature will be offered on a specific online platform, that could be used by all students attending the lectures.
151-0123-00LExperimental Methods for EngineersW4 credits2V + 2UT. Rösgen, K. Boulouchos, D. J. Norris, H.‑M. Prasser
AbstractThe course presents an overview of measurement tasks in engineering environments. Different concepts for the acquisition and processing of typical measurement quantities are introduced. Following an initial in-class introduction, laboratory exercises from different application areas (especially in thermofluidics and process engineering) are attended by students in small groups.
ObjectiveIntroduction to various aspects of measurement techniques, with particular emphasis on thermo-fluidic applications.
Understanding of various sensing technologies and analysis procedures.
Exposure to typical experiments, diagnostics hardware, data acquisition and processing.
Study of applications in the laboratory.
Fundamentals of scientific documentation & reporting.
ContentIn-class introduction to representative measurement techniques in the
research areas of the participating institutes (fluid dynamics, energy technology, process engineering)
Student participation in 8-10 laboratory experiments (study groups of 3-5 students, dependent on the number of course participants and available experiments)
Lab reports for all attended experiments have to be submitted by the study groups.
A final exam evaluates the acquired knowledge individually.
Lecture notesPresentations, handouts and instructions are provided for each experiment.
LiteratureHolman, J.P. "Experimental Methods for Engineers", McGraw-Hill 2001, ISBN 0-07-366055-8
Morris, A.S. & Langari, R. "Measurement and Instrumentation", Elsevier 2011, ISBN 0-12-381960-4
Eckelmann, H. "Einführung in die Strömungsmesstechnik", Teubner 1997, ISBN 3-519-02379-2
Prerequisites / NoticeBasic understanding in the following areas:
- fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer
- electrical engineering / electronics
- numerical data analysis and processing (e.g. using MATLAB)
151-0163-00LNuclear Energy ConversionW4 credits2V + 1UH.‑M. Prasser
AbstractPhyiscal fundamentals of the fission reaction and the sustainable chain reaction, thermal design, construction, function and operation of nuclear reactors and power plants, light water reactors and other reactor types, converion and breeding
ObjectiveStudents get an overview on energy conversion in nuclear power plants, on construction and function of the most important types of nuclear reactors with special emphasis to light water reactors. They obtain the mathematical/physical basis for quantitative assessments concerning most relevant aspects of design, dynamic behaviour as well as material and energy flows.
ContentNuclear physics of fission and chain reaction. Themodynamics of nuclear reactors. Design of the rector core. Introduction into the dynamic behaviour of nuclear reactors. Overview on types of nuclear reactors, difference between thermal reactors and fast breaders. Construction and operation of nuclear power plants with pressurized and boiling water reactors, role and function of the most important safety systems, special features of the energy conversion. Development tendencies of rector technology.
Lecture notesHand-outs will be distributed. Additional literature and information on the website of the lab: Link
LiteratureS. Glasston & A. Sesonke: Nuclear Reactor Engineering, Reactor System Engineering, Ed. 4, Vol. 2., Springer-Science+Business Media, B.V.

R. L. Murray: Nuclear Energy (Sixth Edition), An Introduction to the Concepts, Systems, and Applications of Nuclear Processes, Elsevier
151-0185-00LRadiation Heat Transfer Information W4 credits2V + 1UP. Pozivil
AbstractAdvanced course in radiation heat transfer
ObjectiveFundamentals of radiative heat transfer and its applications. Examples are combustion and solar thermal/thermochemical processes, and other applications in the field of energy conversion and material processing.
Content1. Introduction to thermal radiation. Definitions. Spectral and directional properties. Electromagnetic spectrum. Blackbody and gray surfaces. Absorptivity, emissivity, reflectivity. Planck's Law, Wien's Displacement Law, Kirchhoff's Law.

2. Surface radiation exchange. Diffuse and specular surfaces. Gray and selective surfaces. Configuration factors. Radiation exchange. Enclosure theory, radiosity method. Monte Carlo.

3.Absorbing, emitting and scattering media. Extinction, absorption, and scattering coefficients. Scattering phase function. Optical thickness. Equation of radiative transfer. Solution methods: discrete ordinate, zone, Monte-Carlo.

4. Applications. Cavities. Selective surfaces and media. Semi-transparent windows. Combined radiation-conduction-convection heat transfer.
Lecture notesCopy of the slides presented.
LiteratureR. Siegel, J.R. Howell, Thermal Radiation Heat Transfer, 3rd. ed., Taylor & Francis, New York, 2002.

M. Modest, Radiative Heat Transfer, Academic Press, San Diego, 2003.
151-0203-00LTurbomachinery Design Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 20.
W4 credits2V + 1UR. S. Abhari, N. Chokani, B. Ribi
AbstractIntroduction to the understanding of a broad range of turbomachinery devices.
Learn the steps of turbomachinery design.
ObjectiveUnderstand the principles, and learn the design procedures and the behaviour of turbomachines.
ContentDiese Vorlesung beschreibt die Grundlagen des Designs von Turbomaschinen (Turbinen und Verdichtern). Dazu werden zunächst die theoretischen Grundlagen vertieft erarbeitet. Ausgehend von den thermodynamischen Grundlagen werden Verlustkorrelationen und -Mechanismen behandelt. Diese Grundlagen führen zu einem Verständnis des 3D Design der Turbomaschinen.
Im zweiten Teil der Vorlesung wird das Verhalten der Turbomaschinen bei veränderten Betriebsbedingungen dargestellt. Ebenfalls behandelt werden mechanische Fragestellungen des Turbomaschinenbaus wie z.B. Vibrationen, Lagerbelastungen und auftretende Spannungen in den Bauteilen.
Lecture notesLecture notes
151-0207-00LTheory and Modeling of Reactive FlowsW4 credits3GC. E. Frouzakis, I. Mantzaras
AbstractThe course first reviews the governing equations and combustion chemistry, setting the ground for the analysis of homogeneous gas-phase mixtures, laminar diffusion and premixed flames. Catalytic combustion and its coupling with homogeneous combustion are dealt in detail, and turbulent combustion modeling approaches are presented. Available numerical codes will be used for modeling.
ObjectiveTheory of combustion with numerical applications
ContentThe analysis of realistic reactive flow systems necessitates the use of detailed computer models that can be constructed starting from first principles i.e. thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, chemical kinetics, and heat
and mass transport. In this course, the focus will be on combustion theory and modeling. The reacting flow governing equations and the combustion chemistry are firstly reviewed, setting the ground for the analysis of
homogeneous gas-phase mixtures, laminar diffusion and premixed flames. Heterogeneous (catalytic) combustion, an area of increased importance in the last years, will be dealt in detail along with its coupling with homogeneous
combustion. Finally, approaches for the modeling of turbulent combustion will be presented. Available numerical codes will be used to compute the above described phenomena. Familiarity with numerical methods for the solution of partial differential equations is expected.
Lecture notesHandouts
Prerequisites / NoticeNEW course
151-0216-00LWind EnergyW4 credits2V + 1UN. Chokani
AbstractThe objective of this course is to introduce the students to the fundamentals, technologies, modern day application, and economics of wind energy. These subjects are introduced through a discussion of the basic principles of wind energy generation and conversion, and a detailed description of the broad range of relevant technical, economic and environmental topics.
ObjectiveThe objective of this course is to introduce the students to the fundamentals, technologies, modern day application, and economics of wind energy.
ContentThis mechanical engineering course focuses on the technical aspects of wind turbines; non-technical issues are not within the scope of this technically oriented course. On completion of this course, the student shall be able to conduct the preliminary aerodynamic and structural design of the wind turbine blades. The student shall also be more aware of the broad context of drivetrains, dynamics and control, electrical systems, and meteorology, relevant to all types of wind turbines.
151-0251-00LIC-Engines and Propulsion Systems I Restricted registration - show details
Number of participants limited to 60.
W4 credits2V + 1UK. Boulouchos, G. Georges, P. Kyrtatos
AbstractIntroduction to basic concepts, operating maps and work processes of internal combustion engines. Thermodynamic analysis and design, scavenging methods, heat transfer mechanisms, turbulent flow field in combustion chambers, turbocharging. Energy systemic role of IC engines: conventional and electrified vehicle propulsion systems and decentralized power generation.
ObjectiveThe students learn the basic concepts of an internal combustion engine by means of the topics mentioned in the abstract. This knowledge is applied in several calculation exercises and two lab exercises at the engine test bench. The students get an insight in alternative power train systems.
Lecture notesin English
LiteratureJ. Heywood, Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals, McGraw-Hill
151-0293-00LCombustion and Reactive Processes in Energy and Materials TechnologyW4 credits2V + 1U + 2AK. Boulouchos, F.  Ernst, N. Noiray, Y. Wright
AbstractThe students should become familiar with the fundamentals and with application examples of chemically reactive processes in energy conversion (combustion engines in particular) as well as the synthesis of new materials.
ObjectiveThe students should become familiar with the fundamentals and with application examples of chemically reactive processes in energy conversion (combustion engines in particular) as well as the synthesis of new materials. The lecture is part of the focus "Energy, Flows & Processes" on the Bachelor level and is recommended as a basis for a future Master in the area of energy. It is also a facultative lecture on Master level in Energy Science and Technology and Process Engineering.
ContentReaction kinetics, fuel oxidation mechanisms, premixed and diffusion laminar flames, two-phase-flows, turbulence and turbulent combustion, pollutant formation, applications in combustion engines. Synthesis of materials in flame processes: particles, pigments and nanoparticles. Fundamentals of design and optimization of flame reactors, effect of reactant mixing on product characteristics. Tailoring of products made in flame spray pyrolysis.
Lecture notesHANDOUTS are EXCLUSIVELY IN GERMAN ONLY, however
recommendations for English text books will be provided.

TEACHING LANGUAGE IN CLASS is German OR English (ON DEMAND).
LiteratureI. Glassman, Combustion, 3rd edition, Academic Press, 1996.

J. Warnatz, U. Maas, R.W. Dibble, Verbrennung, Springer-Verlag, 1997.
151-0567-00LEngine Systems Information W4 credits3GC. Onder
AbstractIntroduction to current and future engine systems and their control systems
ObjectiveIntroduction to methods of control and optimization of dynamic systems. Application to real engines. Understand the structure and behavior of drive train systems and their quantitative descriptions.
ContentPhysical description and mathematical models of components and subsystems (mixture formation, load control, supercharging, emissions, drive train components, etc.).
Case studies of model-based optimal design and control of engine systems with the goal of minimizing fuel consumption and emissions.
Lecture notesIntroduction to Modeling and Control of Internal Combustion Engine Systems
Guzzella Lino, Onder Christopher H.
2010, Second Edition, 354 p., hardbound
ISBN: 978-3-642-10774-0
Prerequisites / NoticeCombined homework and testbench exercise (air-to-fuel-ratio control or idle-speed control) in groups
151-0569-00LVehicle Propulsion Systems Information W4 credits3GC. Onder, P. Elbert
AbstractIntroduction to current and future propulsion systems and the electronic control of their longitudinal behavior
ObjectiveIntroduction to methods of system optimization and controller design for vehicles. Understanding the structure and working principles of conventional and new propulsion systems. Quantitative descriptions of propulsion systems
ContentUnderstanding of physical phenomena and mathematical models of components and subsystems (manual, automatic and continuously variable transmissions, energy storage systems, electric drive trains, batteries, hybrid systems, fuel cells, road/wheel interaction, automatic braking systems, etc.).

Presentation of mathematical methods, CAE tools and case studies for the model-based design and control of propulsion systems with the goal of minimizing fuel consumption and emissions.
Lecture notesVehicle Propulsion Systems --
Introduction to Modeling and Optimization
Guzzella Lino, Sciarretta Antonio
2013, X, 409 p. 202 illus., Geb.
ISBN: 978-3-642-35912-5
Prerequisites / NoticeLectures of Prof. Dr. Ch. Onder and Dr. Ph. Elbert are also possible to be held in German.
227-0247-00LPower Electronic Systems I Information W6 credits4GJ. W. Kolar
AbstractBasics of the switching behavior, gate drive and snubber circuits of power semiconductors are discussed. Soft-switching and resonant DC/DC converters are analyzed in detail and high frequency loss mechanisms of magnetic components are explained. Space vector modulation of three-phase inverters is introduced and the main power components are designed for typical industry applications.
ObjectiveDetailed understanding of the principle of operation and modulation of advanced power electronics converter systems, especially of zero voltage switching and zero current switching non-isolated and isolated DC/DC converter systems and three-phase voltage DC link inverter systems. Furthermore, the course should convey knowledge on the switching frequency related losses of power semiconductors and inductive power components and introduce the concept of space vector calculus which provides a basis for the comprehensive discussion of three-phase PWM converters systems in the lecture Power Electronic Systems II.
ContentBasics of the switching behavior and gate drive circuits of power semiconductor devices and auxiliary circuits for minimizing the switching losses are explained. Furthermore, zero voltage switching, zero current switching, and resonant DC/DC converters are discussed in detail; the operating behavior of isolated full-bridge DC/DC converters is detailed for different secondary side rectifier topologies; high frequency loss mechanisms of magnetic components of converter circuits are explained and approximate calculation methods are presented; the concept of space vector calculus for analyzing three-phase systems is introduced; finally, phase-oriented and space vector modulation of three-phase inverter systems are discussed related to voltage DC link inverter systems and the design of the main power components based on analytical calculations is explained.
Lecture notesLecture notes and associated exercises including correct answers, simulation program for interactive self-learning including visualization/animation features.
Prerequisites / NoticePrerequisites: Introductory course on power electronics.
227-0523-00LRailway Systems IW6 credits4GM. Meyer
AbstractBasic characteristis of railway vehicles and their interfaces with the railway infrastructure:
- Transportation tasks and vehicle types
- Running dynamics
- Mechanical part of rail vehicles
- Brakes
- Traction chain and auxiliary supply
- Railway power supply
- Signalling systems
- Traffic control and maintenance
Objective- Overview of the technical characteristics of railway systems
- Know-how about the design and construction principles of rail vehicles
- Interrelationship between different fields of engineering sciences (mechanics, electro and information technology, transport systems)
- Understanding tasks and opportunities of engineers working in an environment which has strong economical and political boundaries
- Insight into the activities of the railway vehicle industry and railway operators in Switzerland
- Motivation of young engineers to start a career in the railway industry or with railway operators
ContentEST I (Frühjahrsemester) - Begriffen, Grundlagen, Merkmale

1 Einführung:
1.1 Geschichte und Struktur des Bahnsystems
1.2 Fahrdynamik

2 Vollbahnfahrzeuge:
2.3 Mechanik: Kasten, Drehgestelle, Lauftechnik, Adhäsion
2.2 Bremsen
2.3 Traktionsantriebssysteme
2.4 Hilfsbetriebe und Komfortanlagen
2.5 Steuerung und Regelung

3 Infrastruktur:
3.1 Fahrweg
3.2 Bahnstromversorgung
3.3 Sicherungsanlagen

4 Betrieb:
4.1 Interoperabilität, Normen und Zulassung
4.2 RAMS, LCC
4.3 Anwendungsbeispiele

Voraussichtlich ein oder zwei Gastreferate

Geplante Exkursionen:
Betriebszentrale SBB, Zürich Flughafen
Reparatur und Unterhalt, SBB Zürich Altstetten
Fahrzeugfertigung, Stadler Bussnang
Lecture notesAbgabe der Unterlagen (gegen eine Schutzgebühr) zu Beginn des Semesters. Rechtzeitig eingschriebene Teilnehmer können die Unterlagen auf Wunsch und gegen eine Zusatzgebühr auch in Farbe beziehen.
Prerequisites / NoticeDozent:
Dr. Markus Meyer, Emkamatik GmbH

Voraussichtlich ein oder zwei Gastvorträge von anderen Referenten.

EST I (Herbstsemester) kann als in sich geschlossene einsemestrige Vorlesung besucht werden. EST II (Frühjahrssemester) dient der weiteren Vertiefung der Fahrzeugtechnik und der Integration in die Bahninfrastruktur.
227-0526-00LPower System Analysis Information W6 credits4GG. Hug
AbstractThe goal of this course is understanding the stationary and dynamic problems in electrical power systems. The course includes the development of stationary models of the electrical network, their mathematical representation and special characteristics and solution methods of large linear and non-linear systems of equations related to electrical power networks.
ObjectiveThe goal of this course is understanding the stationary and dynamic problems in electrical power systems and the application of analysis tools in steady and dynamic states.
ContentThe course includes the development of stationary models of the electrical network, their mathematical representation and special characteristics and solution methods of large linear and non-linear systems of equations related to electrical power grids. Approaches such as the Newton-Raphson algorithm applied to power flow equations, superposition technique for short-circuit analysis, equal area criterion and nose curve analysis are discussed as well as power flow computation techniques for distribution grids.
Lecture notesLecture notes.
227-0731-00LPower Market I - Portfolio and Risk Management Information W6 credits4GD. Reichelt, G. A. Koeppel
AbstractPortfolio and risk management in the electrical power business, Pan-European power market and trading, futures and forward contracts, hedging, options and derivatives, performance indicators for the risk management, modelling of physical assets, cross-border trading, ancillary services, balancing power market, Swiss market model
ObjectiveKnowlege on the worldwide liberalisation of electricity markets, pan-european power trading and the role of power exchanges. Understand financial products (derivatives) based on power. Management of a portfolio containing physical production, contracts and derivatives. Evaluate trading and hedging strategies. Apply methods and tools of risk management.
Content1. Pan-European power market and trading
1.1. Power trading
1.2. Development of the European power markets
1.3. Energy economics
1.4. Spot and OTC trading
1.5. European energy exchange EEX

2. Market model
2.1. Market place and organisation
2.2. Balance groups / balancing energy
2.3. Ancillary services
2.4. Market for ancillary services
2.5. Cross-border trading
2.6. Capacity auctions

3. Portfolio and Risk management
3.1. Portfolio management 1 (introduction)
3.2. Forward and futures contracts
3.3. Risk management 1 (m2m, VaR, hpfc, volatility, cVaR)
3.4. Risk management 2 (PaR)
3.5. Contract valuation (HPFC)
3.6. Portfolio management 2
2.8. Risk Management 3 (enterprise wide)

4. Energy & Finance I
4.1. Options 1 – basics
4.2. Options 2 – hedging with options
4.3. Introduction to derivatives (swaps, cap, floor, collar)
4.4. Financial modelling of physical assets
4.5. Trading and hydro power
4.6. Incentive regulation
Lecture notesHandouts of the lecture
Prerequisites / Notice1 excursion per semester, 2 case studies, guest speakers for specific topics.
Course Moodle: https://moodle-app2.let.ethz.ch/course/view.php?id=3271
227-0759-00LInternational Business Management for Engineers Information W3 credits2VW. Hofbauer
AbstractGlobalization of markets increases global competition and requires enterprises to continuously improve their performance to sustainably survive. Engineers substantially contribute to the success of an enterprise provided they understand and follow fundamental international market forces, economic basics and operational business management.
ObjectiveThe goal of the lecture is to get a basic understanding of international market mechanisms and their consequences for a successful enterprise. Students will learn by practical examples how to analyze international markets, competition as well as customer needs and how they convert into a successful portfolio an enterprise offers to the global market. They will understand the basics of international business management, why efficient organizations and effective business processes are crucial for the successful survival of an enterprise and how all this can be implemented.
ContentThe first part of the course provides an overview about the development of international markets, the expected challenges and the players in the market. The second part is focusing on the economic aspects of an enterprise, their importance for the long term success and how to effectively manage an international business. Based on these fundamentals the third part of the course explains how an innovative product portfolio of a company can be derived from considering the most important external factors and which consequences in respect of product innovation, competitive product pricing, organization and business processes emerge. Each part of the course includes practical examples to demonstrate the procedure.
Lecture notesA script is provided for this lecture.
Prerequisites / NoticeThe lecture will be held in three blocks each of them on a Saturday. Each block will focus on one of the three main topics of the course. Between the blocks the students will work on specific case studies to deepen the subject matter. About two weeks after the third block a written examination will be conducted.
529-0193-00LRenewable Energy Technologies I
Does not take place this semester.
The lectures Renewable Energy Technologies I (529-0193-00L) and Renewable Energy Technologies II (529-0191-01L) can be taken independently from one another.
W4 credits3GA. Wokaun, A. Steinfeld
AbstractScenarios for world energy demand and CO2 emissions, implications for climate. Methods for the assessment of energy chains. Potential and technology of renewable energies: Biomass (heat, electricity, biofuels), solar energy (low temp. heat, solar thermal and photovoltaic electricity, solar chemistry). Wind and ocean energy, heat pumps, geothermal energy, energy from waste. CO2 sequestration.
ObjectiveScenarios for the development of world primary energy consumption are introduced. Students know the potential and limitations of renewable energies for reducing CO2 emissions, and their contribution towards a future sustainable energy system that respects climate protection goals.
ContentScenarios for the development of world energy consumption, energy intensity and economic development. Energy conversion chains, primary energy sources and availability of raw materials. Methods for the assessment of energy systems, ecological balances and life cycle analysis of complete energy chains. Biomass: carbon reservoirs and the carbon cycle, energetic utilisation of biomass, agricultural production of energy carriers, biofuels. Solar energy: solar collectors, solar-thermal power stations, solar chemistry, photovoltaics, photochemistry. Wind energy, wind power stations. Ocean energy (tides, waves). Geothermal energy: heat pumps, hot steam and hot water resources, hot dry rock (HDR) technique. Energy recovery from waste. Greenhouse gas mitigation, CO2 sequestration, chemical bonding of CO2. Consequences of human energy use for ecological systems, atmosphere and climate.
Lecture notesLecture notes will be distributed electronically during the course.
Literature- Kaltschmitt, M., Wiese, A., Streicher, W.: Erneuerbare Energien (Springer, 2003)

- Tester, J.W., Drake, E.M., Golay, M.W., Driscoll, M.J., Peters, W.A.: Sustainable Energy - Choosing Among Options (MIT Press, 2005)

- G. Boyle, Renewable Energy: Power for a sustainable futureOxford University Press, 3rd ed., 2012, ISBN: 978-0-19-954533-9

-V. Quaschning, Renewable Energy and Climate ChangeWiley- IEEE, 2010, ISBN: 978-0-470-74707-0, 9781119994381 (online)
Prerequisites / NoticeFundamentals of chemistry, physics and thermodynamics are a prerequisite for this course.

Topics are available to carry out a Project Work (Semesterarbeit) on the contents of this course.
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